The best Canon camera in 2024: Canon's top mirrorless, DSLRs and compacts

Best Canon cameras: Quick menu

Canon EOS R3

(Image credit: Lena Selkin Photography)

Top picks
1: Best overall Canon EOS R5
2: Best budget Canon EOS Rebel SL3 / 250D
3: Best wildlife Canon EOS R7
4: Best beginner Canon EOS R100
5: Best hybrid Canon EOS R6 II
6: Best professional Canon EOS R3
7. Best for creators Canon EOS R50
8. Best video Canon EOS R5C
9. Best vlogging Canon PowerShot V10
10. Best DSLR Canon EOS 90D
How we test cameras
FAQs

Choosing the best Canon camera is a tall order. We are, after all, talking about the biggest camera company in the world! Canon makes everything from budget beginner bodies all the way up to cameras used to shoot movies, so there's a lot to choose from. 

In my opinion, the best Canon camera overall is the mighty Canon EOS R5. It's a camera I personally bought because there is simply nothing it can't do, between its 45MP sensor (capable of shooting up to 400MP images!), 8K video, 20fps bursts and weather sealing. It was so far ahead of its time that it's still a technological marvel –  but because it was released back in 2020, there are some great deals on it. 

It's not all about horsepower, though! What you need is the right tool for the job. There are Canon cameras in every category, from wildlife to video, for newcomers to professionals. So here are my top picks…

Canon since the film days!
Photographer James Artaius holding a Canon EOS R camera
Canon since the film days!
James Artaius

My first camera was the Canon AE-1, and since then I've been using everything from PowerShot snappers to Cinema EOS monsters personally and professionally. I used to write for our print publication PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, so I'm well placed to help you work out which is the best Canon camera for you!

Best Canon camera: Top picks

The best Canon camera for 2024

Why you can trust Digital Camera World Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out how we test.

Best overall

(Image credit: James Artaius)
Best Canon camera overall

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full frame CMOS
Megapixels: 45MP
Monitor: 3.15-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 2,100k dots
Continuous shooting speed: 12fps mechanical shutter, 20fps electronic shutter
Viewfinder: 0.5-inch OLED EVF, 5,690k dots, 100% coverage
Max video resolution: 8K DCI or UHD at 30p
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible image quality
+
Exceptional 8K video

Reasons to avoid

-
Recording limits
-
4K video is average

I was so blown away by the Canon EOS R5 that I bought one on release day – it is that good. For my money (quite literally) it does anything and everything you could ask of a camera. Not only do you get high-resolution 45MP stills as standard, it can also shoot up to 400MP images in a special mode. It offers lightning-fast continuous shooting, too, delivering bursts of up to 20fps.

It's also a monster at video, with its headline RAW 8K 30p video being utterly gorgeous – and it can be oversampled for stunning 4K HQ (though the standard 4K mode is nothing to write home about). Yes there are well-publicized overheating limits, but in truth I've never had any problems in personal use – the only time I ran into issues was when I torture-tested the camera for my review. 

The R5's autofocus is so good that I called it a cheat code, and I stand by that: Dual Pixel CMOS AF II is the best system in the industry right now – better than that of the Sony A9 III and NIkon Z8 / Z9. Add in weather sealing, rock-solid in-body image stabilization (up to 8 stops) and support for superfast CFexpress B cards (as well as standard SD cards) and this is a camera that can take on any task. 

Read my full Canon EOS R5 review for more details

Best budget

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
Best budget Canon camera

Specifications

Type: DSLR
Sensor: APS-C
Lens mount: Canon EF-S
Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Max burst speed: 5fps
Max video resolution: 4K UHD at 25p

Reasons to buy

+
A lightweight, intuitive DSLR
+
Superb Live View shooting

Reasons to avoid

-
Larger than mirrorless rivals
-
Relatively few AF points

Not everyone needs all the firepower – or all the expense – of a camera like the R5. For photography students or complete newcomers, a budget DSLR body can be the best option – and I think the Rebel SL3 (aka the 250D in Europe) is capable, cheap, and a great way into the Canon ecosystem. 

It uses older DSLR technology, so it lacks the features and finesse of mirrorless cameras, but when you're learning you don't need all the bells and whistles! And just because it's cheap, doesn't mean it's crap; I've taken images with this 24.1MP APS-C sensor that look as good as anything I've shot on a $4,000 camera. It's also compact and comfortable to hold – in fact, its ergonomics are better than some much newer cameras I've used!

The SL2 is a superb starter camera at a superb price, and the EF and EF-S lenses you use with it can be adapted to Canon's mirrorless EOS R cameras – so when your skills grow and you upgrade your body, you can keep using your lenses. 

 Read our full Canon EOS Rebel SL3 / 250D review for more details

Best wildlife

(Image credit: Alis Volat)
Best Canon camera for wildlife

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C size
Megapixels: 32.5MP
Screen type: Articulating LCD, 1.62million dots
Viewfinder: 2.36m dot, 120fps
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 30fps electronic, 15fps mechanical
Max video resolution: 4K 60p
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Amazing 15fps / 30fps burst shooting
+
Detailed 32.5MP APS-C sensor
+
4K 60p or 7K oversampled 4K 30p

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the biggest buffer 
-
New control wheel is unusual

The R7 is Canon's top-flight APS-C camera, and is such a powerhouse that it actually packs more megapixels (32.5MP) than some of its full-frame cameras! While it's a fantastic all-rounder, what I love to use it for most is wildlife photographer.

This is mainly due to the 1.6x crop factor of Canon's APS-C sensor, which increases the equivalent focal length of your lenses; when I mount the Canon RF 600mm on the R7 it becomes an effective 960mm lens! So, between the longer focal length giving you more reach and the extra resolution giving you more room to crop, I find this a uniquely capable camera for wildlife. 

It rattles off stills at up to 30fps, so you never miss a moment, and packs the same autofocus system as the R5, so the camera never misses a beat. And if you shoot video it can capture 4K that's oversampled from 7K, for maximum detail. It's weather-sealed to withstand outdoor conditions, packs dual memory cards and a joystick, and on top of everything it's image-stabilized as well. 

Read my full Canon EOS R7 review for more details

Best beginner

(Image credit: James Artaius)
Best beginner Canon camera

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C size
Megapixels: 24.1MP
Screen type: Fixed 3-inch (non-touch)screen, 1.04m dots
Viewfinder: 2.36m dots, up to 60fps refresh rate
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 6.5fps (3.5fps with AF)
Max video resolution: 4K up to 25p (1.55x crop)
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Cheap but capable
+
Great image quality
+
Guided menus to help you learn

Reasons to avoid

-
No touchscreen
-
4K is cropped, no Dual Pixel AF
-
Limited ISO range

In my opinion, there's no better way to learn photography than to use a mirrorless camera. The viewfinder and rear screen show you exactly what your images will look like, as you adjust the exposure settings, which helps you understand how things like aperture and shutter speed work. And what I really love about the R100 is that it has a guided user interface, with menus that show you how to achieve effects such as blurred backgrounds or frozen motion. 

While it's a beginner camera, the R100 is still amazingly capable. Canon's trusty 24.1MP APS-C sensor delivers images worthy of far more advanced cameras – I was blown away by the quality of the files. I also love that it's got a microphone jack, which is rare on a camera at this price point – so if you want to shoot video you can get great quality sound using a dedicated mic (rather than relying on the built-in mics). That said, there are some compromises with 4K video; it incurs a 1.55x crop and doesn't make use of the brilliant Dual Pixel Autofocus. 

The R100 is an incredibly compact camera, and paired with the similarly compact Canon RF-S lenses fits great in a sling bag or handbag for run-and-gun shooting. However, those with larger hands might find it a bit too small (and it's also worth noting that the screen is fixed, and doesn't offer touch-control). Those few foibles aside, this is a brilliant beginner camera.

Read my full Canon EOS R100 review for more details

Best hybrid

(Image credit: James Artaius)
Best hybrid

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full frame CMOS
Megapixels: 24.2MP
Monitor: 3-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 1,620k dots
Continuous shooting speed: 12fps mechanical shutter, 40fps electronic shutter
Viewfinder: 0.5-inch OLED EVF, 3,690k dots, 100% coverage
Max video resolution: 4K 60p, 1080p 180p
User level: Enthusiast/professional

Reasons to buy

+
Mind-blowing autofocus
+
40fps burst shooting
+
Uncropped 4K 60p

Reasons to avoid

-
Slower SD cards
-
Not the biggest buffer
-
4K recording limits

Ever since the DSLR days, the 6-series has carved a niche as Canon's all-rounder range. And the R6 Mark II is a worthy successor to the Canon EOS 6D Mark II (the last DSLR I bought!) offering an upgrade in every department. 

This is one of the most formidable hybrid cameras around, punching well above its weight. I was amazed at the 40fps burst rate, which is even faster than the flagship EOS R3! It uses the same flagship autofocus system, too, so this is a camera that's up to the task of sports, wildlife and fast action. The 24.2MP sensor can capture oversampled 6K for gorgeous 4K 60p video, too – and Canon has introduced one of my favorite features, pre-capture, which enables the camera to record 0.5 seconds of stills or up to 5 seconds of video before you fully depress the shutter. 

My only reservations with the camera are the buffer, which at 75 RAW images did catch up with me when shooting at 40fps – possibly due to the choice of SD cards instead of CFexpress (though that does keep the cost down). Also be aware that you're limited 40 minutes of oversampled 4K 60p or 6 hours of 4K 30p before the camera cuts off.

Read my full Canon EOS R6 Mark II review for more details

Best professional

(Image credit: Lena Selkin Photography)
Best Canon camera for professionals

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS
Megapixels: 24.1
Monitor: 3.2-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 4.15 million dots
Continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Viewfinder: Electronic 0.5-inch, 5.76m dots
Max video resolution : 6K 60p
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
6K RAW video
+
Blackout-free 30fps bursts
+
Move AF points with your eyeball!

Reasons to avoid

-
No 8K video
-
Only a 24.1MP sensor
-
Split SD/CF Express card slots

Right now this is Canon's flagship camera, and for good reason. Boasting a pro form factor with integrated vertical grip (and bigger battery), I find it the best-balanced EOS R camera when using pro lenses and long telephotos. It's also a technological powerhouse, with a feature that I don't think gets enough love: Eye Control AF. 

Depending on what you use it for, this really is a game-changer. There are eight infrared blasters in the viewfinder that track the movement of your eye; this enables you to move the focus point simply by looking at a subject, which is faster than moving the joystick or relying on the accuracy of the autofocus. If you're shooting a celebrity in a crowd, for example, the AF won't necessarily know who to focus on… but now you can just look at the celeb, to move the AF point there, then half-press the shutter for the AF to lock on. It's like an autofocus hotkey, and it even works with my glasses on! 

Of course, this is a sports camera – so you're getting superfast 30fps shooting for both JPEG and RAW, powered by the same cheat code autofocus found in the EOS R5. I'm also a big fan of its video capabilities (even though the top-tier C-Log 2 isn't offered in-camera), especially the 6K 60p and the sublime 4K 120p, and the image stabilization that keeps every shot rock-steady. 

Read my full Canon EOS R3 review for more details

Best for creators

Canon EOS R50 digital camera

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan)
Best Canon camera for creators

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: APS-C
Megapixels: 24.2
Monitor: 2.95-inch articulating touchscreen, 1.62 million dots
Continuous shooting speed: 15fps
Viewfinder: 0.39 OLED EVF, 2.36 million dots
Max video resolution : 4K 30p
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Super small and lightweight
+
Easy, guided menu system
+
Vlogging and social media features

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the latest AF system
-
Single control wheel
-
Unbalanced with bigger lenses

The direct replacement for the best-selling Canon EOS M50 Mark II, the R50 is aimed at content creators who need something compact enough to carry around with them but capable enough to get the shot when shooting stills and video. At first glance this looks exactly like the M50, but there are plenty of changes under the hood – and the one I'm most pleased with is the lack of crop when shooting 4K video! (Though you do still have the native 1.6x crop of the APS-C sensor.)

I was also thrilled that Canon added the Dual Pixel CMOS AF II system, which makes this an incredibly potent camera for vlogging and video (especially with social media-friendly features like vertical video capture). It's not the full fat Dual Pixel, as it doesn't have the full suite of subject tracking (for things like planes and horses), nor does it have automatic eye priority – but the face and eye detection still perform brilliantly. 

It's no slouch for stills, either, as I took some stunning shots with the 24.2MP sensor. Like the R100, it lacks image stabilization and is very compact – so those with larger hands should give it a test drive first. Otherwise, if you're a YouTuber junkie, this is a fantastic camera to sharpen your skills.

Read my full Canon EOS R50 review for more details 

Best video

Canon EOS C70

(Image credit: James Artaius / Digital Camera World)
Best Canon camera for video

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Super35
Megapixels: 8.8MP
Lens mount: Canon RF
Screen: 3.5-inch articulating LCD touch, 2.76 million dots
Viewfinder: N/A
Max burst speed: N/A
Max video resolution: DCI 4K 60p
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
True cinema body and performance
+
Incredible Super35 sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
No good for stills 
-
R5C has many better specs

If you want to put a video on YouTube, go for the R50. But if you want real professional performance (without shelling out for the very best cinema cameras), you've got two options: the Canon EOS R5C or the EOS C70. In many respects the R5C is actually the superior camera, offering full frame 8K video and all the latest technology. However, it offers it in the body of an R5 – and that comes with some compromises. 

The reason I recommend the C70 is because it's a true cinema camera, not a hybrid one. That means you get connections like mini XLR and Time Code BNC / HDMI. You get a Dual Gain Output sensor with 16 stops of dynamic range. You get a bigger body with all the controls and inputs and buttons you need, multiple mounting points, and most importantly a huge battery that will last serious filming sessions. 

This is effectively the Canon EOS C300 Mark III in a smaller body with an RF mount. Canon even makes a 0.71x speedbooster that enables you to use EF glass on the Super35 sensor with the same field of view as a full-frame camera. If you need a proper production camera in a run-and-gun setup, this is the one I'd go for. It's an offically Netflix-approved camera, too! 

Read my full Canon EOS C70 review for more details

Best vlogging

Reviewer holding a Canon PowerShot V10

(Image credit: James Artaius)
Best vlogging

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1-inch CMOS
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 6.6mm f/2.8 (equivalent 18mm for stills, 19mm for video)
LCD: 2-inch 180° tilting touchscreen
Viewfinder: None
Maximum recording time: 1 hour
Max video resolution: 4K 30p
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
All-in-one vlogging solution
+
As simple as a smartphone
+
Pocket-sized, with built-in stand

Reasons to avoid

-
Lens is prone to fingerprints
-
Fixed wide-angle focal length

People look at me funny when I recommend this camera, but I'm serious: if you want an all-in-one, easy-to-use, fire-and-forget camera to film a vlog, the PowerShot V10 is what you need. I love the fact that Canon went right back to the drawing board to create it. It isn't just a a normal mirrorless camera with some video specs; it's built for the sole purpose of pointing at you and filming a vlog.

It's positively pocket-sized, being as small as a packet of cigarettes (if you don't smoke, it's about the same size as the LCD screen on a camera like the EOS R5). Using it is simple: just put it on the table in front of you, using the built-in stand, and press the big red record button. That's it! No fiddling with codecs or zooming in or out or changing settings, you literally point and press record – it's exactly as simple as using your smartphone. 

It's easy to handhold (unlike trying to hold a mirrorless camera backwards while filming yourself), the touchscreen is great quality and very responsive, the autofocus and image stabilization are great, and the video quality (along with the stills) is super impressive. As someone who has a small YouTube channel and has spent far too much time fiddling with lenses and settings before I can film anything, I love this camera and how idiot-proof it is!

Read my full Canon PowerShot V10 review for more details

Best DSLR

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
Best current Canon DSLR

Specifications

Type: DSLR
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 32.5MP
Lens mount: Canon EF-S
Screen: 3.0in touch, pivot 1,040,000 dots
Viewfinder: Pentaprism
Max burst speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Tremendous value
+
Fully articulated touchscreen

Reasons to avoid

-
Pixel count causes noise issues
-
Unimpressive buffer capacity

Okay, why do I rate this "the best" DSLR over the workhorse Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and former flagship Canon EOS-1D X Mark III? One key factor: the price. Both those cameras still cost quite a chunk of change, and I'll be honest – if you're going to spend that much money on a camera, you're going to get far more bang for your buck buying mirrorless.

There has to be a good reason to opt for a DSLR in this day and age, and I think the 90D still presents a great case. Like the EOS R7 it has a pixel-packed 32.5MP sensor, uncropped 4K video and robust weather sealing. Its 10fps burst rate isn't nearly as fast, but is more than enough for anything short of top-tier wildlife or sports shooting. 

I would argue that the 90D's beefier body is more comfortable than its svelte mirrorless counterparts, and plenty of people (including my colleague Sebastian) prefer an optical viewfinder over the modern electronic version. Above all, though, the best reason to go for the 90D is its stunning battery life that leaves mirrorless cameras in the dust.

Read our full Canon EOS 90D review for more details 

How we test cameras

I've personally used every camera on this list, so I'm sharing my own hands-on experience with each model. When I evaluate a camera, I take it into the field for real-world shooting; for wildlife cameras I photograph wildlife, for sports cameras I shoot sports and so on. I believe you have to test cameras in the context of what they're intended to do!

On many occasions I also test cameras in a professional working environment, such as when I'm shooting commissions for clients. I look at everything from functions and features to ergonomics and ease-of-use, image quality to weather sealing, and retail price to battery life.

In addition, my colleague Ben Andrews is the manager of our in-house testing lab – he tests camera resolution, dynamic range and noise under scientifically controlled conditions using two key testing tools: Imatest Master and DxO Analyzer. All DSLRs and mirrorless cameras are subjected to these tests and, in some instances, high-end compact cameras too.

1. Resolution (ISO-12233): We use a resolution chart based on ISO-12233 from Applied Image inc to indicate the limit of the camera’s vertical resolution at the centre of the frame. The higher the value, the better the detail resolution.

2. Dynamic range (DxO Analyzer): This is a measure of a camera’s ability to capture detail in the highlights and shadows. We use DxO’s transmissive chart, which enables us to test a dynamic range of 13.3 stops.

3. Noise (DxO Analyzer): We use the dynamic range transmissive chart to analyze the signal-to-noise ratio for RAW and JPG files at every sensitivity setting using DxO Analyzer. A higher value means the signal is cleaner.

Read more: How we test and review

Sigma 14-24mm f/2.8 DG HSM

(Image credit: James Artaius)

FAQs

What Canon camera do most photographers use?

The 5D line of workhorse DSLRs – the most recent model being the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV – has proved enduringly popular over the years, both with enthusiasts and professional photographers. 

The now-discontinued Canon EOS M50 was the company's most popular mirrorless camera pretty much since the day it launched, being the go-to camera for a generation of vloggers and content creators. It has since been replaced by the Canon EOS R50

Best Canon camera for beginners?

Canon EOS M50 Mark II

(Image credit: James Artaius)

Is EOS M discontinued?

Canon officially discontinued the EOS M line of mirrorless cameras in late 2023. Bodies like the Canon EOS M50 Mark II are still available, as are the best Canon EF-M lenses, but there will be no new cameras or lenses for the system. 

Do Canon DSLR lenses work on mirrorless cameras?

Yes! Canon EF and EF-S lenses can be easily adapted to the Canon RF-mount (and the discontinued Canon EF-M mount) using official and unofficial mount adapters. 

However, RF (and EF-M) lenses cannot be adapted to EF-mount DSLRs. In short, DSLR lenses work on mirrorless cameras, but mirrorless lenses do not work on DSLRs. 

What does "EOS" stand for in Canon EOS?

EOS isn't an acronym and doesn't stand for anything. It is a stylized version of the name Eos, the Greek goddess of the dawn. 

Take a look at the best Canon RF lenses for mirrorless cameras, as well as the best Canon DSLR lenses. If you're an EOS M user, check out the best Canon EF-M lenses.

James Artaius
Editor

The editor of Digital Camera World, James has 21 years experience as a journalist and started working in the photographic industry in 2014 (as an assistant to Damian McGillicuddy, who succeeded David Bailey as Principal Photographer for Olympus). In this time he shot for clients like Aston Martin Racing, Elinchrom and L'Oréal, in addition to shooting campaigns and product testing for Olympus, and providing training for professionals. This has led him to being a go-to expert for camera and lens reviews, photo and lighting tutorials, as well as industry news, rumors and analysis for publications like Digital Camera MagazinePhotoPlus: The Canon MagazineN-Photo: The Nikon MagazineDigital Photographer and Professional Imagemaker, as well as hosting workshops and talks at The Photography Show. He also serves as a judge for the Red Bull Illume Photo Contest. An Olympus and Canon shooter, he has a wealth of knowledge on cameras of all makes – and a fondness for vintage lenses and instant cameras.