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The best Nikon D3500 deals in September 2021

best Nikon D3500 deals

In effectively replacing the earlier D3400 with the Nikon D3500, the Japanese manufacturer has updated and refreshed one of its classic entry-level DSLR designs, making it even more appealing to first time buyers and offering a viable alternative to mirrorless models.

Below we run through the D3500’s essential key features and our opinions of them. You’ll also find the best prices on this DSLR, which seeks to provide beginner friendliness and responsiveness in spades. Our dedicated team are busy tracking the latest discounts from the world’s top retailers to enable you to find the lowest available prices via this article.

See the full Nikon D3500 review

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The best Nikon D3500 deals

The best entry level DSLR you can purchase today? Probably.

Type: DSLR | Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C DX-format CMOS | Mount: Nikon F | AF points: 11 (1 cross type) | Video resolution: Full HD (1,920 x 1,080) at 60, 50, 30, 25 or 24p | ISO range: 100-25,600 | LCD screen: 3-inch 921k-dot | Shutter speeds: 1/4,000 to 30 sec, Bulb | Weight: 415g (body only) | Dimensions: 124 x 97 x 69.5mm | User level: beginner

Responsive auto focus, 
Affordability
Rear screen is not angle adjustable, 
No 4K video

Fortunately for first time buyers wanting the best deal, the Nikon D3500 is not only its maker’s lightest DSLR, at just 415g with battery and memory card, it’s also its least expensive. 

The fact that it will usually come bundled with a lightweight 18-55mm kit lens out of the box ensures you get everything you need to be quickly up and taking pictures and shooting video. It’s also compatible with a much broader range of lenses and accessories from its manufacturer that can grow in line with your own photographic pursuits. 

Nikon does not include image stabilization within the body of the D3500, so that’s something to bear in mind when selecting lenses to go with it (look for VR in the lens’ model name for optics with built-in anti shake).

(Image credit: Nikon)

With a 24.2 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor at its heart, to quickly get you familiar with the camera’s operational basics a simplified control layout and on-board Guide Mode are provided too. Also helpful on the D3500 is a 5fps maximum shooting speed, which is slightly better than the 3fps most beginner DSLRs offer their first-time users.

Being a starter DSLR, we don’t get the luxury of 4K resolution video capture here, but most amateur videographers will be happy with its Full HD 1920x1080 pixel clips. Bluetooth rather than Wi-Fi is offered by way of cable-free transfer, but at least this still lets us send images to a smartphone, as well as utilise a handset as a remote means of firing its shutter.

Another plus point is the Nikon D3500’s battery life. A full charge of its lithium ion pack will provide 1,550 images, which is pretty incredible for a consumer digital camera and a good three or four times the amount that you’d get from the alternative of a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera.

If you’re comparing this directly with a mirrorless camera however, the D3500’s body is inevitably going to seem chunky by comparison. However the upshot is that we get a decent sized handgrip in comparison. While the LCD here is fixed and isn’t touch sensitive, the sensibly spaced and implemented button layout here is such that we’re not accidentally activating features we don’t want.

With the above overview in mind, check out the best deals we’ve currently found for the Nikon D3500 below…

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Gavin Stoker

Gavin has over 30 year experience of writing about photography and television. He is currently the editor of British Photographic Industry News, and previously served as editor of Which Digital Camera and deputy editor of Total Digital Photography


He has also written for a wide range of publications including T3, BBC Focus, Empire, NME, Radio Times, MacWorld, Computer Active, What Digital Camera and Rough Guide books.


With his wealth of knowledge he is well placed to recognise great camera deals and recommend the best products in Digital Camera World’s buying guides. He also writes on a number of specialist subjects including binoculars and monoculars, spotting scopes, microscopes, trail cameras, action cameras, body cameras, filters, cameras straps and more.