Skip to main content

aTLi Eon camera brings timelapse photography to the masses

Atli Eon
(Image credit: Future)

Whilst most cameras and smartphones can capture timelapse sequences, there is a growing market for bespoke timelapse cameras that can be left in a location to cover, say a building being built, or a flower bud bursting into bloom. The new aTLi Eon aims to give influencers and content creators and simple-to-use and affordable solution for timelapse shooting.

On show at The Photography Show, the camera weighs just 140g, snuggles into the palm of your hand – measuring 72 x 91 x 44mm. Powered by four standard AA batteries it can keep shooting for 60 days is set up to shoot a single frame every 10 minutes.

There is no screen - but you can see what you are shooting using its built-in WiFi and the downloadable app. Footage can be recorded locally using a supplied micro SD card.

(Image credit: Future)

You focus the lens manually - but that is a huge advantage for long-term timelapse shooting, as you can ensure that the image remains sharp and fixed through the sequence. The minimum focus distance is an impressive 70mm.

A neat party trick of this camera is the Timeslice feature that processes a timelapse sequence into a single stills image – which is particularly impressive, when showing a scene, say, changing from night to day. 

(Image credit: Future)

The aTLi Eon is sold as a kit which includes a weatherproof silicon casing, which offers IP65 level water protection. Other accessories in the kit include a mini tripod, UV filter, memory card, battery and cables.

It does not just do timelapse - it can also shoot 1080P video too. Furthermore, it can be set up as a webcam, and even used for live streaming over wifi.

The aTLi Eon retails for $199 / £186. A 4K version of the aTLi is expected to be formally announced later this year.

Read more:

Best video-editing software

Best free software for video editing

The best trail cameras

The best spy cameras

The best body cameras

Chris George

Chris George has worked on Digital Camera World since its launch in 2017. He has been writing about photography, mobile phones, video making and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography. 


His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, with which he won the title of Young Photographer of the Year - long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7, and his iPhone 11 Pro.


He has written about technology for countless publications and websites including The Sunday Times Magazine, The Daily Telegraph, Dorling Kindersley, What Cellphone, T3 and Techradar.