Best lenses for Fujifilm X-T4 in 2022

Best lenses for the Fujifilm X-T4: man holding camera to face
(Image credit: Fujifilm)

It wasn’t so very long ago that the Fujifilm X-T4 was the flagship camera in the X-mount range, with the best specs, the best performance and, some might say, the best looks. And then the Fujifilm X-H2S and the X-H2 happened, raising the bar for professional X-mount cameras for speed and resolution.

But the X-T4 is still an iconic camera that’s still at the cutting edge of APS-C camera performance. It's still one of the best cameras for enthusiasts, best 4K cameras for video and best mirrorless cameras all round. Where the X-H2 models have the firepower, the X-T4 has the iconic Fujifilm retro styling, external exposure controls and compact dimensions – not to mention a far lower price tag.

We’re probably preaching to the converted. If you’re reading this guide, we guess you already have an X-T4 and you’re looking for lenses that can match its potential. 

Many of these are lenses that we’d recommend for any X-mount camera, but here we’ve paid special attention to size and optical performance, and lenses that have physical aperture ring to match the X-T4’s external shutter speed and ISO dials.

Best lenses for the Fujifilm X-T4 in 2022

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(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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The best X-T4 standard zoom all-round, we say, with a 5x range and stabilization

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 16/12
Diaphragm blades: 9
Autofocus: Stepping motor
Stabilizer: 6-stops
Min focus distance: 0.35m
Max magnification: 0.25x
Filter thread: 72mm
Dimensions (WxL): 78.3x88.9mm
Weight: 440g

Reasons to buy

+
High-quality optical construction
+
Close focusing prowess
+
5x zoom range
+
6-stop stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Optically good not great
-
Extends quite a lot at full zoom

Straight in with the controversy! The Fujinon XF 16-80mmF4 R OIS WR is not the fastest standard zoom in the Fujinon line-up or the best – that's the XF 16-55mm f2.8 R LM WR (opens in new tab) – but it's smaller, lighter, cheaper, has a 5x zoom range and optical stabilization, so losing one f-stop in maximum aperture seems a small price to pay. We found it a consistently good performer in outdoor shooting (not so much at close range in the lab), and its build quality and handling are as good as it gets... and ALL lenses should have an aperture ring like this one! The XF 16-55mm f/2.8 might look like the best 'pro' standard zoom, but we think this is a much smaller, cheaper and more versatile all-rounder. It fits the X-T4 nicely and makes a great everyday lens.

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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It's not Fujifilm's top ultra-wide lens, but we think it's the best for X-T4 users

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 14/10
Diaphragm blades: 7
Autofocus: Stepping motor
Stabilizer: 3-stops
Min focus distance: 0.5m
Max magnification: 0.16x
Filter thread: 72mm
Dimensions (WxL): 78x87mm
Weight: 385g

Reasons to buy

+
Wide maximum viewing angle 
+
Constant f/4 aperture 
+
Weather resistant

Reasons to avoid

-
Edge softness at 24mm
-
Fairly expensive

This is a new and improved version of Fujifilm's long-running ultra-wide zoom with a sleeker profile, weatherproofing and improved stabilisation, but with the same optical formulation. The Fujinon XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS WR is certainly a nice lens to use. The build quality, finish and handling are absolutely top-drawer, the constant f/4 maximum aperture is handy for photographers and videographers who like to work with fixed apertures regardless of zoom setting, and the aperture ring is wonderful to have. If only the optical performance hit the same standard. It's great at 10mm, but the softer edges at 24mm are a disappointment, and take the edge off (literally) what could have been a 5-star lens. So why this and not the more 'professional' Fujinon XF8-16mm F2.8 R LM WR? Because that lens is not just massive in its physical dimensions, and in its price tag too. If you can afford it, get it. The image quality and 12mm equivalent angle of view are spectacular, but back on planet Earth we'd still choose the XF10-24mm F4 R OIS WR (opens in new tab) for day to day use.

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
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3. Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR

Fujifilm's excellent 75-210mm equivalent f/2.8 pro telephoto

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 23/16
Diaphragm blades: 7
Autofocus: Triple linear motors
Stabilizer: 5-stops
Min focus distance: 1.0m
Max magnification: 0.12x
Filter thread: 72mm
Dimensions (WxL): 83x176mm
Weight: 995g

Reasons to buy

+
Constant f/2.8 aperture
+
Super-fast triple autofocus 

Reasons to avoid

-
 Fairly heavy
-
 Expensive 

If you're wondering why we haven't included any f/2.8 pro lenses for the X-T4 yet, here's one we would never leave out. Most professional and enthusiast photographers who use full-frame cameras (opens in new tab) grab a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens for telephoto shooting. The Fujifilm XF50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR is the equivalent X-mount lens with an effective 75-210mm zoom range and the same fast, constant f/2.8 aperture. It also happens to be full one of Fujifilm's ‘red badge’ lenses, with fully pro-grade build quality and high-grade glass including five ED elements and one Super ED element, plus dual conventional and nano-structure coatings. The super-fast autofocus is driven by a triple linear motor and, this time, you also get optical stabilisation with class-leading 5-stop performance. The focal length range and wide aperture result in a relatively heavy build but the lens is nevertheless only two-thirds of the weight of most 70-200mm f/2.8 full-frame zooms.

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
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Fujifilm's newly-upgraded portrait prime is simply superb

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 18/8
Diaphragm blades: 11
Stabilizer: No
Min focus distance: 1.0m
Filter thread: 67mm
Dimensions (WxL): 80 x 76mm
Weight: 445g

Reasons to buy

+
11-blade iris gives beautiful bokeh
+
Weatherproofing
+
Close focusing down to 0.5m

Reasons to avoid

-
No image stabilization

The Fujifilm X-T4 has become a favorite camera for portrait and event photography, and the new XF56mmF1.2 R WR is the perfect lens to keep in your bag for work like this, with an equivalent focal length of 84mm, the classic 'portrait' length. With the X-mount camera system now being 10 years old, Fujifilm has been steadily updating some of its older lenses - and now it is the turn for a complete redesign of the 2014-vintage XF56mmF1.2 R – which has been a popular portrait lens, thanks to is focal length, and wide maximum aperture. The new Fujifilm XF56mmF1.2 R WR updates the prime in almost every department – improving resolution, bokeh, and adding weatherproofing. It does look as if the old APD variant is no more, but this new lens is so good, we don't mind.

(Image credit: Rod Lawton)
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Another of Fujifilm's 'new wave' primes, this is the perfect fast 'street' lens

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 15/10
Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilizer: No
Min focus distance: 0.19m
Max magnification: 0.2x
Filter thread: 62mm
Dimensions (WxL): 67 x 77.8mm
Weight: 300g

Reasons to buy

+
Fast and quiet AF
+
Excellent image quality
+
Clean, unfussy design

Reasons to avoid

-
Long for an APS-C 35mm equivalent
-
Internal ‘clonk’ when powered off

This is another of Fujifilm's new wave lenses, redesigns of earlier primes to better match the latest cameras, autofocus systems and sensors. The Fujinon XF23mmF1.4 R LM WR is noticeably longer than the lens it replaces and doesn't seem to have a lot of glass in the front for an f/1.4, but its performance is impossible to fault – both in terms of autofocus response and image quality. It does exactly what it promises, brilliantly. It’s a bit larger than we might have hoped, though light enough not to unbalance the X-T4 body, and with its 35mm equivalent angle of view, it's a classic fast 'street' lens that's ideal for walkaround travel photography and low light shooting. There's no stabiizer, but the X-T4 has IBIS, so no problem!

(Image credit: Fujifilm)
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6. Fujinon XF16mm F2.8 R WR

Well-priced and lightweight, this little retro-look lens is a great match for the X-T4

Specifications

Mount: Fujifilm X-mount
Elements/groups: 10/8
Diaphragm blades: 9
Autofocus: Stepping motor
Stabilizer: No
Min focus distance: 0.17m
Max magnification: 0.13x
Filter thread: 49mm
Dimensions (WxL): 60x45.4mm
Weight: 155g

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely portable
+
Sharp across the frame

Reasons to avoid

-
No stabilization
-
No fluorine coating

We'll finish with something completely different! The XF16mm F2.8 is not at all fast, not especially wide and certainly not a 'pro' lens. But it's small, extremely pretty in a way that matches the X-T4's style perfectly, and makes a brilliant and unobtrusive little walkaround lens. Fujifilm makes two sets of prime lenses – its bigger, faster f/1.4 primes and a series of much smaller and more modestly priced f/2 lenses – or f/2.8 in this case. This lens plays to all the X-series' strengths, producing images of excellent quality in a tiny package, and finishing it off with a stylish build. For the price, its results are terrific, with decent edge-to-edge sharpness at all aperture settings. Lenses don't have to be big, expensive or ambitious. They can also be small, effective and affordable, like this one.

Read more:

Best Fujifilm cameras
Best cameras for vlogging
Best Fujifilm lenses
Best retro cameras (opens in new tab)

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Rod Lawton
Contributor

Rod is an independent photography journalist and editor, and a long-standing Digital Camera World contributor, having previously worked as DCW's Group Reviews editor. Before that he has been technique editor on N-Photo, Head of Testing for the photography division and Camera Channel editor on TechRadar, as well as contributing to many other publications. He has been writing about photography technique, photo editing and digital cameras since they first appeared, and before that began his career writing about film photography. He has used and reviewed practically every interchangeable lens camera launched in the past 20 years, from entry-level DSLRs to medium format cameras, together with lenses, tripods, gimbals, light meters, camera bags and more. Rod has his own camera gear blog at fotovolo.com (opens in new tab) but also writes about photo-editing applications and techniques at lifeafterphotoshop.com (opens in new tab)