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Best cameras for vlogging in 2022: from mirrorless to pocket sized gimbal cameras

best cameras for vlogging
(Image credit: Getty Images)

The best cameras for vlogging are one-stop shops for serious video creation. An ideal vlogging camera is actually quite a complex proposition, as it's got to have a powerful suite of video options, while also being portable and straightforward enough for a single person to operate it. This does give you quit a bit of flexibility though, and a good vlogging camera can mean a lot of different things, from sophisticated mirrorless systems, to palm-sized waterproof action cameras. So, which to pick?

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Our final shortlist is comprehensive and broad, as we've made sure to include options to suit a range of budgets. A vlogging camera is generally different to a filmmaking camera, so if you're looking for higher-end options, you may want to look at our guide to the best cameras for video (opens in new tab). Still, that's not to say we haven't included some spectacular options for the advanced pro vlogger here though – there was no way we couldn't make space for the fantastic Panasonic Lumix GH6 (opens in new tab).

We've split our guide into two sections – first we deal with the best mirrorless cameras for vlogging, including options from Fujifilm, Canon, Panasonic and more. Next, we've rounded up compacts and action cameras, for those who prefer an all in one solution. Remember, action cameras are also tougher than other types, so if you're planning some extreme sports vlogging, something from GoPro or Insta360 would be a smart choice. 

Ultimately, it comes down to what you want to shoot. Read on for our picks of the best cameras for vlogging, and make sure to pick up some of the essential accessories, like the best microphones (opens in new tab) and best gimbals (opens in new tab)

The best cameras for vlogging: full list

Mirrorless cameras

If you're a serious content creator, a mirrorless camera offers powerful video capabilities, the versatility of interchangeable lenses and almost all of them will take high-quality images too. While DSLRs such as the Canon EOS 90D shouldn't be ruled out, mirrorless cameras are stealing the limelight at the moment thanks to their more advanced features and better handling especially when it comes to vlogging.

(Image credit: Jon Devo)
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A masterful camera for serious vloggers and filmmakers

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 25.2MP
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle, 1,840k dots
Viewfinder: Electronic, 3,680k dots
Lens: Micro Four Thirds mount
Continuous shooting speed: 75fps (electronic shutter) 14fps (mechanical shutter)
Video: 5.8K up to 30p
User level: Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Tons of video options
+
Exceptional stabilisation
+
Oriented around video

Reasons to avoid

-
Complex and expensive

The Panasonic Lumix GH6 is a near-peerless filmmaker's camera. Though all of the company's Micro Four Thirds G-series cameras have pretty impressive video features, the GH series are where the tech is really being pushed forward in exciting new ways. Some would dismiss the Lumix GH6 on account of its comparatively small MFT sensor, but that would be a mistake – the Lumix GH6 is one of the best consumer video cameras you can buy right now, and it's only its price and complexity that stop it being the top camera on this list. 

It's not exactly pitched towards casual vloggers. The Lumix GH6 has a stacked sensor with lightning-fast readout speeds, meaning it can record high-quality video internally, without the need to hook it up to a video recorder. Highlights include 5.7K 30p internal video in ProRes 4:2:2 HQ, 4:2:0 10-bit Cinema 4K 60p internal (with simultaneous 4:2:2 HDMI output), and 5.8K 10-bit anamorphic using the full sensor area. If you don't know what those terms mean, then congratulations, you've just saved yourself two grand, and one of the cheaper cameras on this list will do just fine. If you do, then we can assure you that this might just be the camera you've been waiting for. 

Read our Panasonic Lumix GH6 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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There's not much to dislike about this camera and it's fantastic for vlogging

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.4MP
Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
Screen type: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1.04million dots
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Rock-solid in-body image stabilization
+
Phase detect AF is superb

Reasons to avoid

-
No headphone jack
-
No 4K 60p option

The third version of the camera that put Olympus on the mirrorless map is a truly fantastic option for vlogging. It doesn't have the 4K 60p capability of Panasonic Micro Four Thirds rivals like the Lumix GH5 II, but 4K 30p is enough for most vloggers, and the Olympus wins for autofocus, using on-sensor phase-detect AF rather than the DFD contrast AF system still used by Panasonic. For regular filmmaking this is less of an issue (as "proper" videography should be done with manual focus), but vlogging leaves you at your camera's mercy to keep you in focus – and Panasonic's DFD contrast AF is prone to pulsing, hunting and reprioritizing. The E-M5 Mark III delivers crisp, clean 4K video with rock-solid image stabilization and phase detect AF that won't let you down – and its stills photography performance is top-notch as well.

Read our Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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An impressive lightweight camera packed full of advanced features such a 4K video and in-body stabilization

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.04m dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,360k dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 30/8fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Intermediate/Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Small size & excellent build quality
+
Vari-angle touchscreen
+
In-body image stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the cheapest
-
Fujifilm fans won't like the new mode dial

The Fujifilm X-S10 (opens in new tab)is such a great camera in our eyes it even came first place in our best Fujifilm cameras (opens in new tab) guide. It doesn't have the external exposure dials you'd find on the Fujifilm X-T4 which might disappoint hardcore Fujifilm fans, however, it's still an impressive bit of kit. It features a flip-out screen (which is what makes it so good for vlogging), can shoot 4K video and has 6 stops of in-body stabilization. Should you also want to take photos thanks to its 26.1-megapixel APS-C sensor it can produce beautiful, high-quality images. For the feature, size and handling, this is probably the best APS-C camera you can buy at this price point. 

Read our Fujifilm X-S10 review (opens in new tab)

Best camera for vlogging: Panasonic Lumix S5

(Image credit: Adam Duckworth)
As long as you're not trying to shoot handheld selfies, the S5 is serious but of kit

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full frame
Megapixels: 24.2MP
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle, 1,840k dots
Viewfinder: Electronic, 2,360k dots
Lens: L-mount
Continuous shooting speed: 7fps
Video: Uncropped 4K UHD up to 60/50p
User level: Intermediate/expert

Reasons to buy

+
Best in-class video performance
+
Magnesium frame and vari-angle screen
+
Dual SD card slots

Reasons to avoid

-
HDMI port not full-size
-
Only contrast AF

The Lumix S5 might be on the larger size for a vlogging camera, but with a full-frame sensor, 6.5 stops of image stabilization and a weather-resistant body we think it deserves a spot on this list. Even though the Panasonic GH6 is a lot is newer, you got a lot of camera for the same money with the Lumix S5 and it's much better in low light thanks to its full-frame sensor. It has a fully articulated screen which makes it perfect for self-recording, 14+ stops of dynamic range and 4K video. 

Perhaps the only downside to this powerhouse of a camera is that it uses contrast AF rather than phase-detect AF which is often not as responsive. If you want a camera that's going to be good for stills and video, the Lumix S5 offers 96MP high-resolution RAW+JPEG capture. If you're a serious filmmaker then perhaps the feature-set of the Lumix GH6 will tempt you more but we think the Lumix S5 gives you a heck of a lot for your money.

Read our Panasonic Lumix S5 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
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The design might be a little outdated but the specs are still pretty impressive

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 24.2MP
Lens mount: Sony E
Screen: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 921,000 dots
Viewfinder: Electronic
Continuous shooting speed: 11fps
Max video resolution: 4K

Reasons to buy

+
Image quality and resolution
+
4K video performance
+
Sophisticated autofocus

Reasons to avoid

-
Design feels dated
-
Tilting screen not vari-angle

The Sony A6400's front-facing camera makes it perfect for single-handed video shooters who need to talk directly at the camera. It has a 180-degree flip front-facing screen rather than a vari angle which would've been better but if you just need to see yourself, it shouldn't matter too much. If you're a multi-media content creator, the A6400 is also a great stills camera as well as being able to deliver 4K video. We're not sold on the design, it's practically the same as when the A6000 was released and it's starting to feel a bit outdated. However, we can just about let that slide due to its state-of-the-art focusing system and impressive Eye-AF performance. Since it's release, Sony has also brought out the slightly cheaper A6100 and the more advanced A6600 but for us, we think the A6400 hits the sweet spot for vloggers when it comes to cost and quality. 

Read our Sony A6400 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Jon Devo)
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The perfect camera for vlogging on the go thanks to it's Micro Four Thirds sensor and compact design

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3
Lens mount: MFT
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle, 1,840k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69m dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K UHD
User level: Beginner/enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Quality video and stills
+
Audio-recording capabilities

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body stabilization
-
4K video crop

The Lumix G100 is a compact, easy-to-use camera that has an approachable button and menu layout. Its simplicity will be a big pull for vloggers and creatives who don't want or need anything too complicated. That being said, it still delivers high-quality video and has desirable features such as a viewfinder should you also want to take stills. Plus, it feels like a "proper camera" with its ergonomic grip. While it can shoot 4K, there is a crop factor, which means you're not making the most of the sensor. 

The vari-angle screen makes it great for recording yourself or even recording footage overhead or from the hip. However, it's worth noting the G100 doesn't have any in-body stabilization so you might have to invest in one of the best gimbals (opens in new tab) if you plan on doing a lot of handheld shooting.  Overall, it's a compact, cute and quite cheap camera that does the job, but is lacking a couple of features.

Read our Panasonic Lumix G100 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: James Artaius)
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It might not have 4K video but that will save on memory and transfer time

Specifications

Type: Compact-shape CSC
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 24.1MP
Screen: 3.0-inch 1,040k tilt touch
Viewfinder: 0.39-type OLED EVF, 2.36 million dots
Lens: Canon EF-M
Continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner/intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Fully articulating touchscreen
+
Lightweight and portable
+
Brilliant Dual Pixel AF in 1080p

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dual Pixel AF = iffy focus in 4K
-
4K invokes significant crop

The Canon EOS M50 Mark II isn't the wholesale upgrade over the original Canon EOS M50 (opens in new tab) that many were hoping for, but it's an excellent hybrid mirrorless camera that performs well for stills and video. Its 4K capabilities carry a number of caveats; Canon's brilliant Dual Pixel AF is replaced by contrast detect AF when not shooting in 1080p, and shooting in 4K also results in a significant crop factor. Thus, we can't recommend this camera if you intend to film 4K video. 

However, if you want to shoot 1080p and you're looking for a powerful, easy to use body with great autofocus that's at home with run-and-gun videography, vlogging and creating for TikTok and Instagram, the M50 Mark II is in its element. Canon certainly offers more powerful APS-C cameras, such as the Canon EOS M6 Mark II (opens in new tab), which deliver superior results in both stills and video (especially in 4K). However, the M50 Mark II's party trick is its perfectly pitched performance-to-price ratio. This is an affordable, powerful, compact and easy to use camera that's ideal for travel and everyday photography, as well as all manner of content creation. 

Read our Canon EOS M50 Mark II review (opens in new tab)

Compact/action cameras

Editor's Choice

(Image credit: Basil Kronfli / Digital Camera World)
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The TikTok-ready action cam adds simplicity, and a new 8:7 sensor

Specifications

Weight: 4.5 oz / 127 g
Waterproof: 33.0' / 10.0 m
5K video: up to 60fps
4K video: up to 120fps
2.7K video: up to 240fps
Stills resolution: 27MP
Battery life: 2-3hrs estimate

Reasons to buy

+
Captures versatile 8:7 content
+
Excellent image stabilization
+
Horizon locking at up to 5.3K
+
Simplified interface for beginners

Reasons to avoid

-
Lowlight video isn't great
-
Front display is not touch sensitive
-
GoPro membership required to unlock features

Despite the Hero 11 Black looking like every other GoPro this side of 2019, with upgraded hardware and software, it's a triumph on all fronts. The new, almost square sensor is supremely versatile, the camera's software has been simplified successfully, and GoPro's companion app, Quik has also been improved. With best-in-class stabilization, great-looking video in all but dimly-lit and dark scenes, and some fun new modes like light painting, the Hero 11 Black is an excellent addition to the line.

The Hero 11 Black's 8:7 aspect ratio is also a standout highlight for content creators. Able to shoot in 5.3K resolution, 8:7 video at up to 30fps, its footage can be losslessly cropped to create new 4K portrait, landscape, and square clips from a single video.

On top of 8:7 video, the Hero 11 Black captures 5.3K resolution video at 60 fps, 4K resolution video at 120 fps, or 2.7K resolution at 240 fps. You can also grab 27MP stills from 5.3K video.

The Hero 11 Black might not have wildly improved the line's lowlight performance. Still, with its new 8:7 sensor, a simplified interface, and enhanced horizon leveling, it's upgraded GoPro's offering in a meaningful way. Particularly appealing to folks who use multiple social platforms, nothing else can do quite what the 11 Black can.

Read our full GoPro Hero 11 Black review

GoPro Subscription explained: what you get, and is it worth it

Generally we would recommend a mirrorless camera for more serious vlogging, but there are a couple of compact cameras that are especially interesting thanks to their smaller size, front-facing screens and video capability. Beyond that, though, there are some terrific action cameras which can take your vlogging in a whole new direction.

Read more: The best compact digital cameras (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
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A vari angle screen and super-fast AF make this adapted RX100 ideal for vloggers

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1in
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8
Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 921k dots
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic port: Yes
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Supplied mic windshield
+
Super-fast AF
+
Vari-angle screen

Reasons to avoid

-
Small-ish rear screen and not 16:9

While the new Sony ZV-E10 (opens in new tab) spiritually supersedes it, the ZV-1 remains a great option that doesn't require you to faff with lens changing. Some might dismiss the ZV-1 as yet another Sony RX100 variant, but it’s much more than that. The sensor and lens might be familiar, but the body, the controls, the audio and the rear screen are all new and different and optimized brilliantly for vlogging. There are a couple of niggles. The huge change in the minimum focus distance when you zoom in is annoying and the SteadyShot Active stabilization didn’t work too well for us, but the autofocus is exceptional and the ZV-1 is a joy to use, not least because here at last is a vlogging camera that really is designed specifically for vlogging, right down to that fully vari-angle rear screen and the supplied mic wind shield, which really does work brilliantly. It's also a LOT cheaper than the flagship Sony RX100 VII (opens in new tab) camera, despite offering a better proposition for vloggers.

Read our Sony ZV-1 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Basil Kronfli/Digital Camera World)
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If you're an action and adventure sport vlogger look no further than the GoPro Hero 10

Specifications

Weight: 158g
Waterproof: 10m
5K video: up to 60fps
4K video: up to 120fps
1080: up to 240fps
720: up to 240fps
Stills resolution: 23MP
Battery life: 1-3hrs estimate

Reasons to buy

+
Front-facing screen
+
23MP photos  
+
14.7 MP grabs from video

Reasons to avoid

-
Larger physical size than earlier GoPros
-
5K video takes up a lot of memory

Though launched without much fanfare and looking identical to the Hero9 Black (opens in new tab) in almost every way, the Hero10 Black is nevertheless a significant upgrade. That’s all down to its use of the all-new GP2 processor, which powers both a speedy user interface, doubles the frame rates and fuels the best image stabilization tech yet. The larger, 2.27-inch display and the handy front-facing screen is what makes this camera perfect for vlogging - especially if you like to blog on the move, up a mountain or even when riding a bike!

The highlight is its 5.3K 60p video capabilities and GoPro's new HyperSmooth, 4.0 video stabilization. It works in all modes and alongside its 23MP camera, it produced the best photos and has the best low-light performance of any GoPro. Content can be transferred super fast via a cable and it has an auto-upload feature that automatically adds photos and video to the cloud while it recharges. Some upgrades aren't all that exciting but the Hero10 Black was definitely worth the wait. 

Read our GoPro Hero10 Black review (opens in new tab) - See also GoPro Hero 9 vs Hero 10 Black (opens in new tab)

Insta360 ONE RS

(Image credit: Jamie Carter)
This modular action camera can do just about everything

Specifications

Weight: 125.3g (4K Boost lens); 135.3g (360 Lens)
Dimensions: 70.1x49.1x32.6mm; 70.1x49.1x43mm
Waterproof: 5m
Stills resolution: 48MP; 18.5MP
Video resolution: 6K
Memory: MicroSD
Battery life: 75 minutes; 82 minutes

Reasons to buy

+
4K and 360º lens options
+
Good battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Getting pricey
-
No stabilisation in 6K

This really is an all-in-one action camera – the Insta360 One RS Twin Edition can handle all sorts of vlogging and movie-making functions, including even 360-degree video. The trick is its modular design that allows you to swap out different lens modules, meaning you can choose between the 4K Boost Lens and the 360º fisheye lens, depending on what you want to shoot.

And not only this, but the Insta360 One RS Twin Edition boasts a ton of internal options, too. Thanks to the powerful core module, you can output video at a 100mpbs bit-rate using the H.265 codec, as well as lossless ProRes 422 if you get Insta360's Studio desktop software. There's also a 6K widescreen mode for getting really cinematic – though since you don't get the six-axis gyroscope FlowState Stabilization in that mode, it can look comparatively jerky.

Read our Insta360 ONE RS Twin Edition review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
(opens in new tab)
A flip-up screen, decent 1-in sensor and a compact body – ideal for vloggers

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1in
Lens: 24-100mm (equiv.) f/1.8-2.8
Screen: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1.04million dots
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic port: Yes
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
4K video with no crop
+
Can livestream and shoot vertically

Reasons to avoid

-
A little pricey
-
No viewfinder

When the Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II showed popularity with vloggers, Canon sensibly leaned into it and gave us the Mark III, a compact that improves on it in all the right ways to provide a perfect compact vlogging solution. It's got 4K video with no crop, an external mic port, and even lets you livestream to YouTube! There's also the option to extract high-quality stills from 4K footage (useful for those thumbnails), and the excellent autofocus system works well with the 24-100mm (equivalent) f/2.8-1.8 lens and stacked 1-inch CMOS sensor to produce video of enviable quality. It even enables you to shoot vertical video that's very phone and Instagram story friendly – an incredibly useful function. It's still good, but it has been upstaged rather by the Sony ZV-1.

Read our Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Basil Kronfli/Digital Camera World)
(opens in new tab)
This gimbal and camera duo is perfect for vloggers who might want to talk and walk

Specifications

Sensor: 1/1.7-inch CMOS
Lens: 20mm equivalent f/1.8
ISO range: 100-6400
Video: 4K UHD up to 60fps
Stabilisation: 3-axis
Storage: microSD
Dimensions: 124.7×38.1×30mm
Weight: 117g

Reasons to buy

+
Best-in-class pocketable stabilization
+
Creator Combo is perfect for vloggers
+
Crisp video

Reasons to avoid

-
Gets hot when shooting 4K

If you want a best-in-class tool when it comes to combining stable video and pocketable size, nothing else trumps the DJI Pocket 2. If you get it as part of the Creator Combo, external audio and the ultra-wide lens are excellent additions, and it’s basically a pocket studio. Noise handling is probably the Pocket 2’s weakest area, and it struggles with highlights, though in most well-lit environments, the convenience, versatility, and stabilization it offers can’t be overstated. Better still, the gimbal stabilization brings a level of smoothness to run and gun style video that's difficult (or impossible) to achieve with a bigger camera.

Read our DJI Pocket 2 review (opens in new tab)

How we test cameras

We test cameras (opens in new tab) both in real-world shooting scenarios and in carefully controlled lab conditions. Our lab tests measure resolution, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio. Resolution is measured using ISO resolution charts, dynamic range is measured using DxO Analyzer test equipment and DxO Analyzer is also used for noise analysis across the camera's ISO range. We use both real-world testing and lab results to inform our comments in buying guides.

What to look for in a vlogging camera

1) External microphone (opens in new tab) port
When it comes to producing professional-looking videos you'll need good quality audio. In-camera mics are ok but you'll want to use an external mic if you plan on recording audio so make sure to invest in a camera with a mic input.

2) LCD screen that can flip round to the front
A full articulated screen is essential if you want to record yourself talking to the camera. It takes away any guesswork involved and ensures the framing of the shot is just right. Most of the time you can get away with just having a tilting screen but vlogging is the one area of photography and videography where a front-facing screen is a must.

3) AF system with effective tracking
If you plan on recording yourself while moving away, you'll need a camera that has responsive AF tracking. Since you won't actually be able to change the focus point while filming, you'll want to use eye or face AF so that the focus is always on you. This is when cameras with phase-detect AF are particularly good as they are much more consistent with moving images, unlike contrast-detect which has a tendency to hunt and drift.

4) 4K video
You can probably get away with a camera that doesn't have 4K capabilities however, technology is advancing so quickly you may as well future-proof your purchase. Even if you shoot in 4K, you can upload in 1080p to save on time but at least you have that option. You can crop into 4K, reframe your video and still output at 1080p so it's more flexible to get a camera that is 4K ready. For more information on post-production, check out our guides on the best video editing software (opens in new tab)

5) Great stills quality
Chances are if you're a vlogger you'll have an Instagram account and want to be able to capture stills as well as video. Nobody wants to carry around two cameras if you can get one that will do both jobs equally well. Of course, some of the best camera phones (opens in new tab) will be great for creating content, but it'll never be as good quality as an actual camera. Our guide on the best cameras for Instagram (opens in new tab) will be a good place to look if that is your chosen platform. 

The best cameras for streaming (opens in new tab)

All of the cameras on our list are ideal for vlogging, you'll just have to decide how much you want to spend, how portable you need it to be and what types of vlog you'll want to film

Read more: 

Best mirrorless camera (opens in new tab)
The best laptop for video editing (opens in new tab)
Best 4K camera for filmmaking (opens in new tab)
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Best PTZ cameras (opens in new tab)
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Best camera for professionals (opens in new tab)
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Hannah Rooke
Staff Writer

Having studied Journalism and Public Relations at the University of the West of England Hannah developed a love for photography through a module on photojournalism. She specializes in Portrait, Fashion and lifestyle photography but has more recently branched out in the world of stylized product photography. For the last 3 years Hannah has worked at Wex Photo Video as a Senior Sales Assistant using her experience and knowledge of cameras to help people buy the equipment that is right for them. With 5 years experience working with studio lighting, Hannah has run many successful workshops teaching people how to use different lighting setups.