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The best YouTube cameras in 2022: We choose our favorite content creation tools!

best YouTube camera - smiling woman presenting instructional cooking video
(Image credit: Getty Images)

The best YouTube camera will not be the same for everyone. It all depends on the kind of content you create and where and how you do your filming. So we've prepared a list of do-it-all mirrorless and compact cameras for indoor and outdoor use, higher-end movie making tools that are still affordable and small, simple and tough 'adventure' cameras that can go anywhere and film anything!

Choosing the best camera will give your content and your channel a real boost. We've used all these cameras and we think they are the best choices for YouTubers right now, but they reflect very different shooting styles, so pick the type that suits your content and your channel!

It's not just about choosing the best or most expensive camera. The trick is to choose the right kit for what you want to video. If your channel is filled dynamic, action-packed adventure, an action cam is the obvious candidate. The best action cameras capture really high-quality footage these days and, for another spin (ha ha), what about one of the best 360 cameras?

If your style of filmmaking is more measured, then a mirrorless camera is the obvious candidate. This will give you access to cutting-edge video technology, higher-quality capture and the ability to swap lenses. 

A third alternative is to go for a compact camera where the lens is part of the camera. You lose out in versatility, but compact cameras tend to be much more affordable and simpler to use, and there's a lot less to carry around than with a mirrorless model.

One more thing. Do you want to do livestreaming? In this case the choice narrows a little – not all cameras can livestream straight out of the box. Our guide includes a few, but see our guide to the best cameras for streaming for a larger selection.

So our guide includes all three camera types for all these different use cases.

The best YouTube cameras in 2022

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
We love the way Sony has 're-imagined' its A6000 series as a practical and affordable video tool

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 24.2MP (effective)
Lens mount: Sony E
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 921,600 dots
Viewfinder: No
Max video resolution: 4K UHD
Mic input: Yes
Headphone jack: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent video autofocus
+
Clip-on wind muffler

Reasons to avoid

-
'Jello' effect in 4K
-
Cumbersome Sony menus

Following the success of the vlogger-oriented compact ZV-1 (elsewhere in this guide), Sony tried to repeat the trick with a mirrorless camera. Step froward the Sony ZV-E10, an E-mount APS-C mirrorless model capable of shooting beautifully detailed 4K UHD 30p video, and bursting with vlogger-aimed features like a 3-directional capsule mic, a clip-on wind muffler and a fully adjustable vari-angle screen.

It's smartly done, and the camera impresses. Minus a bit of rolling shutter here and there, it shoots excellent-looking 4K video, and its sophisticated mic system means you can produce great-sounding vlogs without having to fork out for too much extra gear. There's no viewfinder, but as a YouTube shooter you're probably not going to use one anyway, and this helps keep the cost of the camera down. Sony's video autofocus is class-leading, and it's present and correct on this capable camera.

• Read our full Sony ZV-E10 review

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
Is the Sony ZV-E10 too much for you? Then try the compact ZV-1 – we think it's brilliant

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1-inch CMOS
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 921,600 dots
Viewfinder: No
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic input: Yes
Headphone port: No

Reasons to buy

+
Vari-angle screen
+
Clip on wind shield
+
24-70mm f/1.8-2.8 zoom

Reasons to avoid

-
No viewfinder

The Sony ZV-1 is like a movie-orientated version of Sony's long-running RX100-series compacts. It's also way cheaper than the flagship Sony RX100 VII, so for once Sony has reversed its usual technology/price escalation. The XV-1 has the same 4K video capability and blindingly fast autofocus, and a new 'Product Showcase' mode is perfect when holding objects up to the camera. The vari-angle screen is more useful than the tilting screen on the regular RX100, and the microphone has a clip-on wind shield (supplied) which is a huge advantage for outdoor shooting, where even a light breeze can cause awful buffeting with regular in-camera mics. The Version 2.0 firmware update adds live streaming via USB to this camera's formidable capabilities although, oddly, Sony warns it's not compatible with the Mac Big Sur operating system. When that's fixed, it will be hard to fault this camera.

Read more: Sony ZV-1 review

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
It's a step below the sensational GH6, but we think it could be overkill, and the GH5 II may be all you need

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Lens mount: MFT
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.84m dots
Viewfinder: Electronic
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic input: Yes
Headphone jack: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
6.5 stop in-body stabilization
+
60fps/10-bit 4K recording
+
A great stills camera too!

Reasons to avoid

-
Video AF lags behind rivals

The clue is in the name. A Mark II version of anything is likely to be a refresh rather than a whole new camera, and it’s the same here. But while the GH5 II might appear superficially similar to its predecessor, it incorporates a large number of improvements and additions that make quite a difference when you add them together – and they are even more impressive given the price.

Panasonic has stuck with its own DFD contrast based autofocus even though rival makers have switched to faster and more reliable phase AF. Panasonic's DFD AF has steadily improved, but it still tends to hunt and lose contact with subjects – which is bad news if you are trying to film yourself. 

With an articulating display that opens out to the side it won’t be blocked by a shotgun mic mounted on the hotshoe, so you can vlog obstruction-free, and it also has a full-sized HDMI-out, for easy-to-access clean video – perfect for pairing with an Atomos Ninja V, for example. The Lumix GH5 II would be best suited to a more advanced YouTuber who can make the best use of its advanced video settings and won't be fazed by its quirky AF.

• Read our full Panasonic Lumix GH5 II review

(Image credit: Jon Devo)
Smaller, lighter, simpler and cheaper than the GH5 II, we'd choose this if you're just starting out

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3
Lens mount: MFT
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle, 1,840k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69m dots
Video resolution: 4K
Microphone port: Yes
Headphone port: No

Reasons to buy

+
Quality video and stills
+
Audio-recording capabilities

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body stabilization
-
4K video crop

The Lumix G100 is a compact, easy-to-use camera that has an approachable button and menu layout. It's simplicity will be a big draw for YouTubers who don't want or need anything too complicated. That being said, it still delivers high-quality video and has desirable features such as a viewfinder should you also want to take stills plus it feels like a "proper camera" with its ergonomic grip. While it can shoot 4K, there is a crop factor so you're not making the most of the sensor. The vari-angle screen makes it great for recording yourself or even recording footage overhead or from the hip. However, it's worth noting the G100 doesn't;t have any in-body stabilization so you might have to invest in one of the best gimbals if you plan on doing a lot of handheld shooting.  Overall, it's a compact, cute and quite cheap camera that does the job but is lacking a couple of features.

• Read our full Panasonic Lumix G100 review

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
We think this is the best YouTube camera for livestreaming at this price

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1-inch CMOS
Megapixels: 20.2MP
Lens: 24-100mm f/1.8-2.8
Screen: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Viewfinder: Electronic
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic input: Yes
Headphone port: No

Reasons to buy

+
Easy live streaming to YouTube
+
Microphone input

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
4K clips capped at 10 minutes

One of the biggest bugbears vloggers and video makers have with Canon is the crop factor when shooting 4K on many of its cameras, but the G7 X Mark III bucks the trend – thank goodness. This high-end compact packs a similar body and an identical lens to the G7 X Mark II, but includes a new sensor and no 4K crop. It was also the first camera of its kind with a microphone input – vital if you want clean audio, not to mention the ability to livestream straight to YouTube. This means that even if you’ve got an expensive cinema camera, if you also have a G7 X Mark III you can create a fuss-free live setup without any expensive capture cards and a PC. With its flip-out screen, the G7 X III also gives vloggers a clear view of themselves when they shoot, and thanks to its 20.1MP 1-inch stacked CMOS sensor and Digic 8 processor it’s also able to capture great stills, so your custom thumbnails can pop nicely.

• Read our full Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark III review

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
The Sigma fp is small but powerful, and this quirky little camera is especially effective for static filming

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full frame
Megapixels: 24.6MP
Lens mount: L-mount
Screen: 3.15-inch, 2.1m dots
Viewfinder: No
Video resolution: 4K
Mic socket: Yes
Headphone socket: No

Reasons to buy

+
Can stream over USB 
+
Full-frame sensor
+
Modular, customizable design

Reasons to avoid

-
Flaky continuous AF
-
No built-in EVF
-
Single card slot

The Sigma fp may not be the obvious choice for YouTubing, but thanks to its modular makeup it's an incredibly versatile camera – and it really shines in the video department. Indeed, it also has a very special party trick: it can natively stream over USB. So if you want to a camera for streaming but don't want to invest in an HDMI capture card, you're looking at it. 

The L-mount offers a good selection of lenses, though some come with hefty price tags – though the fp is very adapter-friendly, and bolting on glass (especially vintage) from other brands feels like exactly what this camera is made for. And with 4K up to 30fps and 1080p up to 120fps, the Sigma fp should cover virtually all your video demands – though if you're a lone vlogger, it does have a couple of handicaps. 

Firstly it has a fixed display, meaning you can't flip the screen around to see your framing while you film to camera. This leads to the second shortcoming, which is that the continuous AF is pretty unpredictable, and this is a camera that's best for experienced videographers rather than run and gun novices.

• Read our full Sigma fp review

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
There is a 6K version of this camera, but we think this MFT cinema camera is ideal for YouTube

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: MFT
Megapixels: Not quoted
Lens mount: MFT
Screen: 5-inch, 1920 x 1080 pixels
Viewfinder: No
Video resolution: 4K
Mic socket: Yes
Headphone socket: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent range of ports
+
Giant 5-inch touchscreen
+
Shoots RAW video

Reasons to avoid

-
No flip-out screen
-
No continuous AF

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K looks great value for money today and it's an intriguing alternative for Olympus or Panasonic users who've already invested in MFT lenses. It has some disadvantages, such as no continuous AF and a fixed screen, but this is a cinema camera not a vlogging camera. It always comes back to bang for buck with the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. When you consider the fact you have a mini XLR audio input as well as USB-C storage support for recording to hard drives, a full sized HDMI port and dual card slots, the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K leapfrogs the competition in almost every video-centric area. Consider that the camera also ships with a full licence for Davinci Resolve, an excellent bit of pro video-editing software that normally costs $295/£239, the Pocket Cinema 4K is quite a bargain.

Read more: Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K review 

(Image credit: Basil Kronfli/Digital Camera World)
We love the Pocket 2's portability, simplicity, stabilization and quality!

Specifications

Type: Action camera with gimbal
Sensor: 1/1.7-inch
Megapixels: 64MP (16/64MP images)
Screen: 1-inch touchscreen
Max video resolution: 4K
Mic input: With adapter
Headphone jack: No

Reasons to buy

+
Sensational stabilization
+
Fantastic pocketability
+
Simple operation

Reasons to avoid

-
Relies heavily on extras and accessories

The DJI Pocket 2 replaces the DJI Osmo Pocket, one of our favorite mini-cameras, and is a best-in-class tool when it comes to combining stable video and pocketable size. In turn, it’s an obvious choice for anyone who wants a pull-out-and-shoot small camera for handheld video work. Bought as part of the Creator Combo, adding external audio to the mix is a piece of cake, and there’s also a handy ultrawide lens attachment that definitely drops quality, but adds field of view. Despite some real highlights: shallower depth of field than expected and nippy focusing, not to mention great object tracking and color reproduction, noise handling isn’t a highlight on the Pocket 2. That aside, the convenience, versatility, and stabilization offered by the DJI Pocket 2 can’t be overstated. After all, nothing much can do all the things it can and still slip into a jacket pocket. You can even plug it into your smartphone and get big-screen control and playback via the DJI app.

Read more: DJI Pocket 2 review

(Image credit: Basil Kronfli/Digital Camera World)
We agree it's the camera of choice for YouTube adventure fans – but it is pricey

Specifications

Type: Action camera
Sensor: 1/2.3-inch
Megapixels: 23MP
Screen: 1.4-inch color (front); 2.3-inch touchscreen (rear)
Max video resolution: 5K
Mic input: With adapter
Headphone jack: No

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent stabilization
+
Plenty of accessory options

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than competition
-
Mediocre microphone

The original action camera brand, GoPro is still a YouTuber favorite, with a world-class flagship product that delivers excellent image quality and stabilization for die-hard action fans and globetrotters. It may be more expensive than the DJI Osmo Action, but the GoPro Hero10 Black has the same 1.4-inch front-facing screen (first introduced on the GoPro Hero9 Black now) for easy framing of selfies and videos, and there’s a wide range of third-party accessories. However, this version has the all-new GP2 processor, which files a faster user interface and doubles the frame rates compared to the GoPro Hero9 Black. 

It’s also got some really neat features, the most useful being HyperSmooth 4.0, an image stabilization system that works so well. The result is super-smooth handheld shots. It’s also really hard to resist the option to capture in 5.3K video, and in 60 frames per second. There’s more in store from the GoPro Hero10 Black in the shape of the brand’s Max Lens Mod, which makes use of the camera’s removable lens cover by bringing an ultra wide 155º field of view that will be useful for group-vlogging, yoga classes, and education. Max Lens Mod will also bring a 360º modes pioneered by the GoPro Max; 360º horizon lock, which means you can  rotate through 360º. GoPro now has a suite of modular accessories; the Media Mod wraps around the Hero9 Black and enables Light Mod and Display Mod (if you need an even bigger front-facing screen) to be attached. 

• Read our full GoPro Hero10 Black review

(Image credit: Jamie Carter)
Small enough to wear, good enough for 'proper' video, the Go 2 is tiny and remarkably versatile

Specifications

Stills resolution: 9 megapixels
Video resolution: 1440p
Field of view: Not quoted (11.24mm focal length equivalent
Screen: Info screen in charge case
Storage: Internal, 32GB
Wi-Fi: : Yes
Infrared: No
Operating time: 15-30 minutes
Dimensions: 52.9x23.6x20.7mm
Weight: 26.5g

Reasons to buy

+
Tiny when used 'naked'
+
High resolution for its size
+
Charge case and mounts included

Reasons to avoid

-
Short run time
-
Can 'flick' out of mounts

The Insta360 Go 2 is a cute and tiny wearable camera you can clip to your clothing, snap to a magnetic pendant around your neck, prop up on our own desk in its own holder, stick to a car dash or window... and more. Capable of unique immersive POV shorts and small enough to be poked where other cameras won't fit – even a GoPro – it's also worth considering as a minimalist rig for vloggers and YouTubers. The lightweight Insta360 Go 2 has some surprisingly big features for such a small camera. Excellent image stabilisation, ‘horizon lock’ and a multi-functional battery case make this versatile clip-on camera more than just a novelty item. It comes with its own charging case/mini tripod, a sticky, adjustable desk or wall mount and a magnetic neck lanyard. Amazing.

• Read our full Insta360 Go 2 review

How we test cameras

We test cameras both in real-world shooting scenarios and, for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, in carefully controlled lab conditions. Our lab tests measure resolution, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio. Resolution is measured using ISO resolution charts, dynamic range is measured using DxO Analyzer test equipment and DxO Analyzer is also used for noise analysis across the camera's ISO range. We use both real-world testing and lab results to inform our comments in buying guides.

Read more:

Best cameras for vlogging
Best webcams
Best PTZ cameras
The best 4K camera for filmmaking
The best laptop for video editing
The best microphone for vlogging

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Rod is the Group Reviews editor for Digital Camera World and across Future's entire photography portfolio, with decades of experience with cameras of all kinds. Previously he has been technique editor on N-Photo, Head of Testing for the photography division and Camera Channel editor on TechRadar. He has been writing about photography technique, photo editing and digital cameras since they first appeared, and before that began his career writing about film photography. He has used and reviewed practically every interchangeable lens camera launched in the past 20 years, from entry-level DSLRs to medium format cameras, together with lenses, tripods, gimbals, light meters, camera bags and more.