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Best nanny camera in 2022

best nanny camera
(Image credit: Getty Imagess)

Before deciding which is the best nanny camera for you, it’s important to decide what the words ‘Nanny Camera’ mean to you. For some, it can mean a wider interpretation of baby camera monitor (opens in new tab), in which the camera helps the nannying, while others are more concerned with keeping a close eye on their nanny. 

Other useful guides

Best outdoor security cameras (opens in new tab)

Best indoor security cameras (opens in new tab)

Best pet cameras (opens in new tab)

The best doorbell cameras (opens in new tab)

The best body cameras (opens in new tab) 

Since both involve cameras with remote viewing, this list will help with both, but you should think about what matters to you most; viewing live as-it-happens or recording. The latter often requires a subscription, though an alternative is an on-board memory card.

Nanny cams need to viewed with sense; checking in to see a crying child might distress you but your nanny might be out of view because they’re already heating the milk which will stop the tears. If you’re inclined to this kind of worst-case thinking, a multi-camera pack may alleviate it by letting you see more. 

Nannies can also bristle to cameras at first so be open about your purpose in placing cameras so insult is minimized. You may be using live view only for fear of missing out (that parental bond must be understandable). If your system makes them, be clear about how recorded clips might well exonerate a nanny in an incident, and about how the video is secure, kept only briefly, and not shared except in an incident.

In terms of the device itself, these our our best nanny camera recommendations…

Best nanny camera - Blink Mini

(Image credit: Blink)
Best budget indoor wi-fi nanny cam

Specifications

Video: 1920 x 1080px
Display: Via smartphone
Power: Mains (USB)
Night vision: Yes
Size: 50 x 49 x 36mm
Weight: 48g
Storage: Cloud (subscription)

Reasons to buy

+
Live or cloud-stored video
+
Good range of mounts 
+
Good value

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs power

The Blink Mini makes a great nanny cam thanks to its compact size and unobtrusive aesthetic. Atop that the camera offers a good quality HD camera which works night and day and the unit houses a tiny speaker so you can communicate via two-way-talk. Obviously this isn’t a camera for hiding completely, though you can disable the record light via the app; the small size plays better into the theory that people behave better when they know they’re being watched. You can record clips to a Blink subscription plan ($3/£2.50 a month), or to a USB stick (opens in new tab) via an optional Blink Add-On Sync Module if you prefer; it’s a good choice to have.

It doesn’t hurt one bit that Blink (an Amazon company) seem to have priced the camera aggressively and offer great package deals as well as comprehensive Alexa integrations. 

(Image credit: Nest)
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2. Google Nest Cam (outdoor or indoor, battery)

The best use-it-anywhere nanny cam

Specifications

Video: 1920 x 1080px
Display: Via smartphone
Power: Battery
Night vision: Yes
Size: 83 x 83 x 83mm
Weight: 398g
Storage: Cloud (subscription)

Reasons to buy

+
Smart alerts delivered faster
+
Keeps working in power and connection failures 
+
Magnetic mount

Reasons to avoid

-
Distinctly pricey
-
Nest Cam indoor might be more suitable

Using Google’s Nest Cam as you choice of nanny cam has a lot of advantages, not least the camera’s built-in smarts. Many cameras off some form of intelligent alert, but it used to involve processing at remote servers, and was a feature included in the subscription); but putting AI processing on-board the new Nest Cam might not be the cheapest but it’s appreciably quicker with smart alerts (i.e. it won’t warn you about a pet). 

There is still the option to invest in cloud storage of clips to review events, though the cameras do offer live view and two-way-chat, and can be picked up and placed anywhere in or out of the home. A wi-fi drop-out is no longer a concern either; on-board storage will keep recording up to an hour’s worth of new clips (potentially quite a while since clips are only recorded during activity). 

(Image credit: Eufy)
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3. Eufy Solo IndoorCam P24

A great nanny cam for a big room

Specifications

Video: 2K
Display: Via smartphone
Power: Connected
Night vision: Yes
Size: 166 x 89 x 88mm
Weight: 299g
Storage: micro SD

Reasons to buy

+
360-degree panning
+
Detects Crying
+
Tracks motion

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t work with Eufy Homebase
-
2.4GHz wi-fi

The Eufy Solo makes a great nanny cam because it can be placed in a central location in the home and it will either automatically track people as the move, or you can remotely pan it as you choose. Better still, the alerts system is sound-aware, and can be set to detect crying (or, strictly, excessive noise – but the two are often the same thing) so it’s not only a motion-sensitive device.

You do need to be able to provide a 2.4GHz wi-fi signal, but you won’t be subject to a monthly subscription and video will be stored for you on the camera – up to 128GB worth if you place a large enough microSD card (opens in new tab) inside. 

(Image credit: Blink)
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4: Ring Stick Up Cam Battery

A nanny cam you can move around the house easily

Specifications

Video: 1920 x 1080p
Display: Via smartphone
Power: Connected
Night vision: Yes
Size: 60 x 60 x 97mm
Weight: 299g
Storage: Cloud subscription

Reasons to buy

+
Easily portable
+
Removable battery 
+
Alexa integrations

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t work with Eufy Homebase
-
2.4GHz wi-fi

The Stick Up Cam Battery’s nanny cam credentials are similar to other wi-fi cameras – the device allows straightforward connection to a smartphone app for live-view and subscription recording – bolstered by a range of positioning possibilities. The camera is powered by a removable rechargeable battery (indeed if you already use Ring’s doorbells it is interchangeable).

While it isn’t cheap, the third-generation Stick Up Cam can be easily moved around the home and we liked that the included stand makes it easier to place on furniture than the pricier Google battery camera. The Ring software provides live view and two-way-chat as standard, though recording clips will require a cloud subscription.

(Image credit: Wyze)
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5. Wyze Cam v3

Affordable nanny cam with recording options

Specifications

Video: 1920 x 1080p
Display: Via smartphone
Power: Connected
Night vision: Yes, Color
Size: 60 x 60 x 97mm
Weight: 99g
Storage: Cloud or microSD

Reasons to buy

+
Subscription and built-in card recording
+
IP65 weatherproofing
+
Motion, person and sound detection

Reasons to avoid

-
No Apple HomeKit support

The Wyze v3’s wide ƒ/1.6 image sensor can capture more light than many of its competitors, reflected in the provision of color night vision. It makes a great nanny cam in large part because of its accessible pricing. Despite the price, there is still two-way-talk and even a built-in siren.

Setup is made straightforward by Wyze’s app, but digging a little deeper and support for IFTTT applets (as well as the usual Alexa integrations) offer a little more interest for tech enthusiasts. 

The provision of a microSD slot to record to for free, plus Wyze’s free 14-day event storage is unusually generous, while the upgrade to a paid subscription service (required to enable the intelligent motion detection) isn’t disturbingly pricey either. 

Atop all the features, the device is even weatherproof (it’ll cope with rain, if not a dunking), so can be positioned under the eaves outdoors if you choose. 

(Image credit: Fuvision)
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6. Fuvision Picture Frame

Wi-fi spy-camera picture frame

Specifications

Video: 1080 x 720px
Display: Via smartphone (Yi Eye)
Power: Rechargeable battery
Night vision: Yes
Size: 249 x 203 x 18mm
Weight: 500g
Storage: microSD

Reasons to buy

+
Camera well hidden
+
Wi-fi live view available
+
Cordless design

Reasons to avoid

-
Does not support 5GHz wi-fi
-
App could be better

If you’re looking for a hidden nanny cam that can go in public areas of the home (or to keep an eye on ones you don’t expect to be intruded upon), then this picture frame is ideal. A motion-sensitive camera, powered by a 10,000 mAh rechargeable battery, can be left and forgotten about, while the inclusion of a night vision mode is appreciated.

On the downside, the instructions and software could be a little clearer and (because the electronics are well concealed) charging the battery or getting the microSD out do mean taking the back off. The lack of support for 5GHz wi-fi is also a disappointment, though clips are recorded to the microSD card too.

Nonetheless, if you have the right wi-fi available, the option of instant motion alerts, live view and recorded video do set this apart from other picture frame cameras. It’s something to do with a 5 x 7-inch photo!

Other useful buying guides: 

Best outdoor security cameras (opens in new tab) in 2021

Best indoor security cameras (opens in new tab)

Best spy cameras (opens in new tab)

Best hidden camera detector (opens in new tab)

Best PoE cameras (opens in new tab)

Best pet cameras (opens in new tab)

The best doorbell cameras (opens in new tab)

The best body cameras (opens in new tab) for personal security

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Adam Juniper
Adam Juniper

With over 20 years of expertise as a tech journalist, Adam brings a wealth of knowledge across a vast number of product categories, including timelapse cameras, home security cameras, NVR cameras, photography books, webcams, 3D printers and 3D scanners, borescopes, radar detectors… and, above all, drones. 


Adam is our resident expert on all aspects of camera drones and drone photography, from buying guides on the best choices for aerial photographers of all ability levels to the latest rules and regulations on piloting drones. 


He is the author of a number of books including The Complete Guide to Drones (opens in new tab), The Smart Smart Home Handbook (opens in new tab), 101 Tips for DSLR Video (opens in new tab) and The Drone Pilot's Handbook (opens in new tab)