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The best point and shoot camera in 2022: easy to use cameras to fit every pocket

best point and shoot camera: boy holding a camera up to his face
(Image credit: Iswanto Arif for Unsplash)

A point-and-shoot camera is a really handy bit of kit if you don't want to carry anything heavy or fuss about complicated settings. They can fit in your pocket so you can take them everywhere with you and lots of them come with a built-in flash for when it's dark. You'll instantly notice the upgrade in image quality compared to shooting on a smartphone but you won't need to spend any additional money on lenses.

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With so many point-and-shoot cameras on the market, choosing the right one for you can be a challenge. It's a good idea to think about how advanced you need it to be, what features you can live without and how much you're willing to spend. Cheaper cameras will a much smaller sensors and likely won't be able to shoot in RAW but if you're happy to splurge a bit, you can get some seriously advanced bits of kit that will fit in your pocket. Whether you're looking for an upgrade from your smartphone to take on holidays, day trips, or special occasions, we've put together a list to suit all needs and budgets. 

Even the most expensive point-and-shoot will still cost you a lot less than one of the best DSLRs or best mirrorless cameras plus you don't need to buy additional lenses or a flash. Many professional photographers will own a point-and-shoot as well as their main camera which they keep on them at all times should a photo opportunity arise. 

We think the cameras on our list are fantastic value for money. There's a mix of older and newer models because we think some point and shoots just can't be beaten such as the Panasonic ZS80/TZ90 (opens in new tab). What you want to shoot and how much time you want to spend processing them after using some of the best photo editing software will define which camera to go for. 

To make navigating the guide easier we've split it into three sections:

Cheap and simple – Even the most basic point-and-shoot cameras will offer better image quality and more zoom capabilities than your phone. They might not have some of the more advanced features of more expensive models but at they're affordable and will get the job done. 

Waterproof – Whether or not you're an outdoorsy person, a waterproof camera is a great option as they're more robust and can be used near water or in the rain without any qualms. They're great for beach holidays, using by the pool, or taking on adventures as they are rugged enough to handle getting dropped. 

Longer zooms – One of the advantages of point-and-shoot cameras with a smaller sensor is that often they have longer zoom ranges. Most basic cameras will have a zoom range of 3-5x but some of the more expensive models will give you a 30x optical zoom. These larger zoom ranges are great for taking on holiday where you might want to photograph objects in the distance.

Better quality – The best point-and-shoot cameras will have larger sensors which make them better in low light, the lens is often capable of wider apertures down to f/2.8 and sometimes you can even set the camera to shoot in raw - perfect if you didn't quite expose an image properly. The more advanced cameras do cost more but the features often make it worth it. 

Now that the best camera phones (opens in new tab) produce such good quality images you might wonder why you'd bother investing in a point-and-shoot but believe us, there is a massive difference in image quality. Even the smallest sensors in the cheapest point and shoots are usually bigger than the tiny ones in your smartphone. Features such as the built-in flash will also be much better quality than a phone flash and the zoom will cover a bigger range. 

If you are looking for a really high-end point and shoot, check out our guide on the best compact cameras which covers more advanced and more expensive models. However, if you're just looking for a camera that is a step up from your phone camera and won't cost you much, scroll below to see the best point and shoots available. 

Best point and shoot camera in 2022

If you don't want to pay a fortune and just want a camera that's straightforward and capable, these are the ones to buy.

Waterproof

Want to take your point-and-shoot camera underwater? Want to hike it up mountains, shoot in the snow, or in extreme heat? These are the tough and rugged cameras to choose from.

(Image credit: James Artaius)
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For an underwater camera, the picture quality is amazing and it's really robust too

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 12MP
Lens: 25-100mm f/2-4.9
LCD: 3in, 1,040k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: From kids to adults

Reasons to buy

+
Super-fast burst
+
Tough and waterproof

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller sensor
-
Minor upgrade over predecessor

If you want a camera that does what it says on the tin the Olympus Tough TG-6 is exactly what you need. It might have a small 1/2.3-inch sensor but all things considered, it produced good image quality and it can shoot 4K video. It has a 25-100mm with an aperture of f/2 at the wide end and f/4.9 when it's at its maximum zoom. It includes lots of interesting features that really come to life when shooting in clear water such as Macro and Microscope modes which allow you to get up close and personal. The ability to capture RAW stills and shoot at up to 20fps also make this camera a very good choice. The best thing of all is that it can really take a bashing making it perfect for families with little ones. It's a superb travel camera that benefits from excellent waterproofing - perfect for the more adventurous (or clumsy) type. 

Read more: Olympus Tough TG-6 review (opens in new tab)

Nikon Coolpix W300

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker/Digital Camera World)
With a huge zoom, excellent image-quality, 4K video and fast burst shootings it's THE all-rounder

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 16 MP
Lens: 24-120mm
LCD: 3-inch, 921K dot resolution
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Waterproof to 30 meters
+
Broad zoom range

Reasons to avoid

-
Small controls are fiddly
-
Auto exposure is inconsistent

Perfect for placing in the hands of smaller members of the family who want to take pictures, this toughened water and drop-proofed Nikon Coolpix W300 point-and-shoot should appeal to butter-fingered big kids too, or simply those seeking to achieve more adventurous outdoor photography without risking their smartphone or larger camera set up. Image quality is perfectly adequate and as a way of capturing shots, we might not necessarily otherwise attempt, it comes into its own.

Read more: Nikon Coolpix W300 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Fujifilm)
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3. Fujifilm XP140

Available in four bright colours, it's an everything-proof camera designed for adventures

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 16.4MP
Lens: 28-140mm (equiv) f/3.9-4.9
LCD: 3in, 920k dots
Waterproof: 25m/82ft
Shockproof: 1.8m/5.9ft
Freezeproof: -10ºC/14ºF
Max video resolution: 4K

Reasons to buy

+
Everything-proof
+
Useful zoom lens

Reasons to avoid

-
4K tops out at 15p
-
No manual/RAW shooting

The Fujifilm FinePix XP140 can pretty much handle anything you throw at it. Whether you're taking it 25m underwater, accidentally drop it from heights of 1.8m or want to use it in sub-freezing temperatures, this is a camera that won't let you down. Not only has it got a really tough build, but it also delivers high-quality images no matter what the lighting conditions, but it can also shoot UHD 4K and it's really easy to operate. Even someone who isn't particularly tech-savvy could capture some really nice images. One of the downsides is you can't shoot in Raw and there isn't a manual mode so if you're a bit more of a serious photographer it may not be the camera for you (check out the Olympus TG-6 instead). However, if you just want a camera that you won't break, won't get water damage, and can take some pretty pictures, the Fujifilm XP140 is ideal. 

Longer zoom

For getting pixel-perfect images from a distance, nothing beats an optical zoom. These are point-and-shoot cameras for bringing far-away subjects into close focus.

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker/Digital Camera World)
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Puts a powerful focal range in the palm of our hands for a value price

Specifications

Type: Bridge
Sensor: 1/2.3-inch CMOS
Megapixels: 16MP
Lens: 24-1440mm equivalent in 35mm terms, 60x optical zoom
LCD: 3-inch, 921K dot resolution
Max video resolution: 1080p up to 30fps
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
60x optical zoom reach
+
Great value for money
+
Contrast-y and detailed images achievable shooting handheld at maximum zoom with plenty of light around

Reasons to avoid

-
Frill-free construction feels a little lightweight
-
Rear LCD screen is fixed
-
No 4K video

Those seeking big zoom power from a relatively compact all-in-one setup are directed to the 16-megapixel Nikon B600. Frill-free and a little lightweight in build it may be, despite its mini DSLR type, looks, but that is reflected an extent in the price, while the simplicity of operation and handling makes it accessible to a wider audience. Some three years on from its original pre-pandemic release, this camera offers plenty of visual ‘poke’ for everyday family photography and video capture.

Read more: Nikon Coolpix B600 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker/Digital Camera World)
With a huge zoom, excellent image-quality, 4K video and fast burst shootings it's THE all-rounder

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Lens: 24-720mm 3.3-6.4
LCD: 3in tilting, 1,04k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Effective image stabilisation system
+
Selfie functionality works very well

Reasons to avoid

-
Viewfinder is very small
-
Soft results at wide-angle setting

Despite being five years old, the Panasonic Lumix ZS70/TZ90 is still one of the best, most affordable compact cameras you can buy, in our opinion. It has an enormous 30x zoom which is equivalent of 24-720mm. Even when fully zoomed in, the picture quality isn't bad and built-in image stabilization helps with camera shake. If you're going traveling, the combination of a massive zoom, small body, and WiFi capabilities make it the perfect companion. 

It features a small viewfinder as well as an LCD screen for you to view your images. The 49-point focus system isn't the most advanced but it's speedy enough to capture most things. Image quality is pretty good considering it's only got a 1/2-3 sensor and its metering system helps to balance exposure no matter where you're shooting.

There is actually a newer version of this camera but it doesn't have such a large zoom and you end up paying more. If you wanted a camera that has the better low light performance you might be better off checking out the Panasonic Lumix ZS200/TZ200 as it has a larger 1-inch sensor.

Read more: Panasonic ZS70 review (opens in new tab)

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There's little to not like about the SX740 HS with its big zoom, compact size and 4K abilities

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Lens: 24-960mm f/3.3-6.9
LCD: 3in tilting, 922k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent zoom for such a small body
+
Good operational response
+
4K video

Reasons to avoid

-
LCD isn't touch sensitive
-
No Raw shooting available

If you're after a camera with incredible zoom capabilities look no further than the Canon PowerShot SX740 HS with a focal range equivalent to 24 - 960mm on a full-frame camera. It has a 20.3MP 1/2.3-inch sensor and an LCD screen that can be flipped to face the front making it perfect for selfies. For anyone looking to shoot video too, it can film in 4K and as a max continuous burst shooting mode of 10fps. The Canon PowerShot SX730 HS can be found slightly cheaper if you don't need 4K video and it still has Full HD recording. The image quality and autofocus performance on this camera are pretty good and overall it's an excellent camera for the price.

Read more: Canon PowerShot SX740 HS (opens in new tab)

Better quality

"Point-and-shoot" doesn't mean cheap and poor-quality! Here are the point-and-shoot cameras that cost a little more, but deliver image quality comparable to professional and enthusiast system cameras. 

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker/Digital Camera World)
One-inch sensor plus a 15x optical zoom make for a decent specified compact

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3in
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Lens: 24-720mm 3.3-6.4
LCD: 3in tilting, 1,04k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Five-axis image stabilization supports hand held use
+
4K video clips up to 30fps capture speed
+
Larger than average one-inch sensor size is a boost to image quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Priced at a premium
-
Rear plate LCD screen doesn’t tilt
-
Electronic viewfinder is tiny

There is plenty to admire about the Panasonic Lumix TZ200/TS200, even aside from the headline grabbers of one-inch sensor size and a 15x optical zoom reach from a ‘travel zoom’ camera that will slip unobtrusively into a jacket pocket or rucksack pouch when on the go. Solidly constructed with an aluminum build and ergonomically laid out, it offers a good blend of hands-on control yet point-and-shoot accessibility, with the option to fish around in its pool of creative filters effects if we tire of its automatic results.

Read more: Panasonic Lumix TZ200/TS200 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker/Digital Camera World)
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A larger 1-inch means the LX15 performs much better in low light than other cameras on the list

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1in
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 24-72mm f/1.4-2.8
LCD: 3in tilting, 1,040k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
F/1.4 max. aperture (at wideangle)
+
Swift and accurate AF system

Reasons to avoid

-
No electronic viewfinder
-
No proper grip

If you want a point-and-shoot camera that also delivers a visible jump-up in picture quality from a camera phone, you need one with a larger sensor. The Panasonic LX15, which goes by the name LX10 in some territories, has a 1-inch 20-megapixel sensor that does the job perfectly. It's true that there is no built-in EVF, which might put some people off, and the smooth finish to the body might make it look stylish but doesn't make for the firmest handgrip. But the responsive touchscreen is terrific, the dual control rings provide a very pleasing user experience, and the 24-72mm has one of the widest aperture settings around, courtesy of its f/1.4 to f/2.8 aperture range. Overall, this neat little snapper has a near-perfect balance of features, performance, and pricing. It's small enough for your pocket, easy for beginners, but powerful enough to be one of the best point-and-shoot cameras for serious photographers.

Read more: Panasonic Lumix LX10 Review (opens in new tab) - Panasonic Lumix LX 15 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Future)
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Canon's stylish point and shoot boasts a 1-inch sensor and is very easy to use

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1in
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 28-84mm f/2-4.9
LCD: 3in, 1,040k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 8.2fps
Max video resolution: 1920x1080 (Full HD)
User level: Beginner to intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Compact size
+
Easy to use

Reasons to avoid

-
Zoom range is a little limited
-
No 4K video recording

The Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II is a rather sophisticated-looking point-and-shoot camera, courtesy of its rather minimalist yet traditional appearance and streamlined controls, which have the benefit of keeping the body endearingly dinky. Despite this, it's something of a beast under the bonnet, with a 1-in sensor paired with a wide-angle 28-84mm equivalent lens, whose maximum aperture at wide-angle is a respectable f/2. There's no viewfinder, but the 3in LCD on the rear also responds to touch, which again ensures that physical controls can be kept to a minimum. To sum up, this is a neat-looking, well-specced point-and-shoot compact camera that can produce vastly superior images to a camera phone – and it's rather nice to look at and use.

Read more: Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Sony)
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10. Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VI

If you can afford to splash the cash, the RX100 VI is pretty unbeatable in terms of specs

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1in
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 24-200mm f/2.8-4.5
LCD: 3in tilting, 1,228k dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 24fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Expansive zoom range
+
Built-in EVF

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricey for what it is
-
No touchscreen supplied

While the RX100 VI does cost more than most point-and-shoot buyers are willing to countenance, we couldn’t include it here for the simple reason that this series represents pretty much the best the world of compact cameras has to offer. As the name implies, the VI is the sixth iteration in a series that Sony has been perfecting for many years, providing an exceptional blend of image quality and portability. While the VI has since been superseded by the VII, we reckon this model offers an outstanding balance of power and value for money. 

Super-smooth 4K footage and dynamic burst shooting – it’s all here, and there are plenty of extra features that many cameras on this list don’t offer, such as the pop-up electronic viewfinder. And all this is housed in a camera small enough to pop into a pocket – provided you don’t mind a few of the controls being a little fiddly to use, it’s a boon for travel photography and videography alike. 

If you like the sound of the RX100 VI but are still put off by the cost, then check back through previous models in the RX100 series, as they are without exception very good, and most of them are popular enough to still be in production. And, alternatively, if you've got more cash to splash then definitely take a look at the current flagship, the Sony RX100 VII (opens in new tab).

How we test cameras

We test cameras both in real-world shooting scenarios (opens in new tab) and in carefully controlled lab conditions. Our lab tests measure resolution, dynamic range, and signal-to-noise ratio. Resolution is measured using ISO resolution charts, dynamic range is measured using DxO Analyzer test equipment and DxO Analyzer is also used for noise analysis across the camera's ISO range. We use both real-world testing and lab results to inform our comments in buying guides.

Read more:

The best cameras under $200 (opens in new tab)/£200
10 best cameras under $500 (opens in new tab)/£500
The best compact cameras (opens in new tab)
Best mirrorless cameras (opens in new tab)
The best travel cameras (opens in new tab)
Best waterproof cameras (opens in new tab)

Hannah Rooke
Staff Writer

Having studied Journalism and Public Relations at the University of the West of England Hannah developed a love for photography through a module on photojournalism. She specializes in Portrait, Fashion and lifestyle photography but has more recently branched out in the world of stylized product photography. For the last 3 years Hannah has worked at Wex Photo Video as a Senior Sales Assistant using her experience and knowledge of cameras to help people buy the equipment that is right for them. With 5 years experience working with studio lighting, Hannah has run many successful workshops teaching people how to use different lighting setups.