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    Panasonic TZ40 review

    | Compact Cameras | Reviews | 12/04/2013 11:00am
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    Panasonic TZ40 review: the new addition to Panasonic’s popular ultra-wide TZ range of travel compacts brings a lot of sophisticated features. But can it deliver on image quality? Amy Davies puts it to the test in her Panasonic TZ40 review video.

    Panasonic TZ40 review

    The TZ series is Panasonic’s popular range of travel compacts and this is the TZ40, the latest version, featuring a 20x optical zoom Leica lens.

    The TZ40 has built-in Wi-Fi, which means that you can control the camera remotely via a smartphone app, where you can also save images for sharing online.

    On the side of the Lumix TZ40 is an NFC chip, which means that if you have any compatible devices, all you need to do is tap the two devices together for an instant connection.

    GPS is also built in, which is useful for a travel camera as it saves you having to remember the exact location of all your photos.

    Amy Davies of our testing team puts this new Panasonic camera and all of its key features to the test in her Panasonic TZ40 review video.

    Panasonic TZ40 Review Video Transcript

    The TZ series is Panasonic’s popular range of travel compacts and this is the TZ40, the latest version, featuring a 20x optical zoom Leica lens.

    Unusually for a compact, the TZ40 features a mode dial on top of the camera, where you can access fully manual and semi-automatic modes, such as aperture and shutter priority. Also on this mode dial you’ll find scene modes and fully automatic modes and space for upto two groups of customised settings.

    This camera has built-in Wi-Fi, which means that you can control the camera remotely via a smartphone app, where you can also save images for sharing online. Here on the side of the camera is an NFC chip, which means that if you have any compatible devices, all you need to do is tap the two devices together for an instant connection. If you don’t, then you can still connect via entering a unique password in your device’s Wi-Fi settings.

    GPS is also built in, which is useful for a travel camera as it saves you having to remember the exact location of all your photos – though it is worth remembering having GPS activated can be a drain on a battery life.

    On the back of the camera is a 920,000 dot touchscreen. This is extremely useful for changing the autofocus point, which you can do simply by tapping the area on the screen you want to use. You can also use it to fire the shutter release – the camera will focus first, then capture the image. This is fairly fast and responsive, and is useful when shooting on a tripod for example, or for capturing quick action.

    Aside from the mode dial, there are no settings dials on the TZ40. Instead, if you want to change aperture, you press this Exposure button and then press left or right. To change shutter speed, you use the same button, but  press up or down. Perhaps a little confusingly, you don’t alter exposure compensation with the Exposure button – this has it’s own dedicated button on the four way control pad here.

    A Quick Menu button gives access to all the most commonly used settings, saving you from delving into the more extensive menu. Here you’ll find everyday settings such as ISO and white balance. The number of options changes depending on the shooting mode being used, for instance, you’ll find more when shooting in semi-automatic and fully manual modes.

    The optical zoom lens is extended and retracted via a small switch around the shutter release. The zooming mechanism is pretty smooth and fluid, which is good news considering the 20x optical length. As the zoom reaches its maximum optical capability, it stops, requiring a second push to enter the digital zoom – this is great for preventing an accidental stray into the digital zoom if you don’t want to use it.

    There’s no need to worry about capturing an image at the far end of the optical zoom as Panasonic’s image stabilisation does a fantastic job of preventing blur, even when shooting handheld. Here’s a comparison of the lens extended to full with image stabilisation off, and here, with image stabilisation switched on.

    Previous TZ cameras have really impressed us, so we had high hopes for the TZ40. Happily, we have not been disappointed, with bright and punchy images with plenty of detail.

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    Posted on Friday, April 12th, 2013 at 11:00 am under Compact Cameras, Reviews.

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