Best Micro Four Thirds cameras in 2022 from Olympus / OM System and Panasonic

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras
(Image credit: James Artaius)

When picking out the best Micro Four Thirds cameras, you're essentially dealing with two brands: OM System (formerly Olympus) and Panasonic. Even though Panasonic is busy with its full-frame L-mount, both companies still have their eyes firmly on the prize when it comes to their Micro Four Thirds (MFT) offerings. 

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(Other brands could technically rank among the best Micro Four Thirds cameras, such as Blackmagic and Z Cam, but really those are cine cams – so they're much more at home in our best cinema cameras (opens in new tab) guide.)

The best Micro Four Thirds cameras are small and, more importantly, can make use of small lenses. This is a key advantage of the system – it walks the walk when it comes to portability, unlike larger-sensor mirrorless systems, which can feel very unbalanced with big lenses (even on otherwise small APS-C bodies). 

You'll see the different strengths of the various cameras below but, as a rough guide, OM System / Olympus cameras tend to excel with stills photography features, while the Lumix G models are some of the best consumer video cameras around. That's a bit of a simplification, and there's a lot of crossover between them, but it's a good mindset to start with.

So let's take a look at the best Micro Four Thirds cameras today. We've split these into sections, with top-end cameras first, enthusiast models next and budget / beginner cameras in our third section. The good part is that every group has plenty of options, so whatever your level there will likely be a great camera for you. 

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras in 2022

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Top-end cameras for stills and video

(Image credit: Tom Ormerod)

1. OM System OM-1

One of the most versatile professional cameras ever made

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.4MP
Screen: 3.0-inch 1.62m dot articulating touchscreen
Viewfinder: Electronic 5.76m dots
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 120fps
Max video resolution: 4K 60p
User level: Advanced / Professional

Reasons to buy

+
80MP shooting
+
120fps burst
+
8 stops of stabilization
+
Stacked image sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
Native 20.4MP resolution

Don't let the "OM-1" name fool you into thinking this is a camera from yesteryear – this packs the technology of tomorrow. The world's only IP53 weather-sealed camera, and the world's first Cross Quad Pixel AF camera, it is also packed with bleeding-edge computational photography tech, image stabilization that blows everything else out of the water, and ISO performance that promises parity with full frame sensors. 

However, the caveat is that this is only a 20.4MP sensor – albeit a stacked one, which can deliver 120fps shooting, 80MP pixel-shift stills and 4K 60p ProRes Raw video. You won't find this much firepower in another camera, even one twice the size. This is OM's new flagship, replacing both the OIympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III (opens in new tab) and OIympus OM-D E-M1X (opens in new tab) – and it's one of the most fantastic cameras we've ever used.

Read more: OM System OM-1 review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Panasonic Lumix GH6

(Image credit: Jon Devo)
The best value filmmakers can get? This MFT camera might be it

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 25.2MP
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1.84m dots
Viewfinder: Electronic, 3,680k
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 75fps (electronic shutter) 14fps (mechanical shutter)
Max video resolution: 5.8K
User level: Professional/Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Class-leading video options
+
Exceptional stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Middling battery life
-
Aging AF system

The Panasonic Lumix GH series has long been a favourite among filmmakers. Even with full-frame cameras grabbing attention, these MFT models still manage to stand on their own by offering an unrivalled suite of shooting options for the filmmaker. The most recent, and best yet, is the Panasonic Lumix GH6. Its video recording modes are too multitudinous to list here, but new highlights include: internal Apple ProRes 422 and ProRes 422 HQ, and internal Cinema 4K 4:2:0 10-Bit at 120fps.

We recently tasked a professional filmmaker with putting the Lumix GH6 through its paces for a full review from a video perspective. Their verdict? A smash hit, with superb resolution performance, physical handling, in-body stabilisation. The camera is simply a pleasure to use. Granted, Sony's A7S III will outstrip it in high-ISO noise management. It'll also cost you double the amount. For its price, the Lumix GH6 offers perhaps unbeatable value for filmmakers. 

Read more: Panasonic Lumix GH6 review – a filmmaker's perspective (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Olympus OM-D E-M1X

(Image credit: Future)
Olympus aims for the pros and heavy duty shooters here

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.4MP
Screen: 3.0-inch 1,037k vari-angle touchscreen
Viewfinder: Electronic 2,360k
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 15fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Pro build quality
+
Next-generation AF
+
Good value for a pro camera

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller MFT sensor
-
Bulky for an MFT body

The E-M1X is a lot bigger than the O-M1, which seems to contradict the compact size argument of Micro Four Thirds, but it's built to balance better with Olympus's bigger lenses, such as the 300mm f/4 or 40-150mm f/2.8. It's easy to criticize the size of the smaller MFT sensor, but when you add up the cost of pro lenses for a fully-kitted out sports and wildlife system, the Olympus system is a fraction of the price of its full frame rivals.

Once again, this is a camera that includes a whole box of tricks that go to show why the MFT system is a tempting proposition for any photographer. The OM-D E-M1 X  busts out all the stops, as we discovered when we reviewed the camera. It's got that class-leading image stabilization, that High Res Shot mode capable of capturing 80MP images, as well as the option to capture 50MP images while handheld. It's an astonishing piece of tech, and destroys the narrative that full-frame systems are the only game in town for serious professionals. 

Read more: Olympus OM-D E-M1 X review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
The ultimate hybrid Panasonic stills/4K video camera for many

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Screen: 3-inch, 1,840k pivot touch
Viewfinder: Electronic, 3,680k
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 12fps (6k 30fps, 4k 60fps)
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Professional/Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent all-rounder for both video and stills
+
Superb electronic viewfinder
+
Good layout of controls

Reasons to avoid

-
ISO range comparatively limited

The Panasonic Lumix GH5 II is a new version of the GH5, a camera that was ahead of its time when it was launched in 2017. Though it's since been supplanted by the GH6, it's still an excellent camera in its own right; you still get  20MP stills, 4K 60p video, and 4K 10-bit 4:2:2 video recorded internally, as well as a 6K Photo mode for ultra-fast burst shooting. 4K video at up to 60p is not unusual by today’s standards, but this is still a very powerful, very rounded camera that is likely to appeal to serious filmmakers who can look past the headlines. We gave it a high grade in our review: it may not have reinvented the wheel from the original GH5, but all the small improvements and additions make a tangible difference.

The GH5 is ideal for videographers who also need a good stills camera. If stills are less important, an alternative might be the Lumix GH5S might be better still, as it's even more geared in favour of video. 

Read more: Panasonic Lumix GH5 II review (opens in new tab)

MFT cameras for enthusiasts

(Image credit: James Artaius)
Rugged, fast and packed with features – an all-round ace

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.4MP
Lens mount: NFT
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,037,000 dots
Viewfinder: Electronic
Continuous shooting speed: 30fps (Pro Capture mode), 10fps (mechanical shutter)
Max video resolution: c4K/4K
User level: Enthusiast/Expert

Reasons to buy

+
Up to 80MP imaging
+
7.5 stops of stabilization
+
IP53 weather sealing

Reasons to avoid

-
20.4MP native resolution
-
Single card slot

The OM System OM-5 is a magnificent midrange camera that offers flagship features and all-purpose performance in a compact, affordable package. It has been criticized in some quarters for not offering the same sea change as the OM-1, but for our money this offers the OM-1's coolest tricks in a much more pocketable body – making this your perfect daily driver when you want to go on an adventure (or you want to be prepared for one) with a camera that's there if you need it, and doesn't compromise on quality.

Its everyday 20.4MP resolution can be boosted to 50MP and 80MP if you really need it. You can shoot 4K video in log if you want to. Use Pro Capture to record every split second of a bird taking off, or Live Composite to turn flashes of lightning into ferocious forks of abstract art. Take silky smooth waterfall shots without bringing ND filters, or focus stack insect images for all the depth of field you want. For an all-in-one tool that will enable you to make the most of your outdoor pursuits, the OM-5 is the perfect adventure buddy. 

Read more: OM System OM-5 review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

(Image credit: Future)
A formidable flagship camera at bargain prices... if you can still find it

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.4MP
Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,037,000 dots
Viewfinder: Electronic
Max burst speed: 60fps
Max video resolution: 4K

Reasons to buy

+
60fps at full resolution
+
Superb image stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Convoluted menu system
-
Some awkward controls

When the E-M1 Mark II was launched it was certainly a professional camera, but prices have fallen as it has stayed on sale alongside the newer Mark III version, making it a very attractive proposition for enthusiasts. You get a 20MP sensor, vari-angle screen, 4K video, 60fps Pro Capture, Live Composite and Focus Stacking features, weatherproofing and – if you team it up with the Olympus 12-100mm f/4 Pro lens which has its own stabilisation – possibly the most stable platform for handheld shooting or video anywhere. 

When you look back at out review of the camera from 2017 you can see how well-featured the E-M1 Mark II was – 60fps burst shooting is still more than competitive today, as is the camera's comprehensive stabilisation system. 

Read more: Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
Photo flagship with a price tag almost half what it was

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.68million dots
Monitor: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 1.04million dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: xfps
Movies: 4K
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
80MP option in Raw and JPEG
+
Excellent viewfinder

Reasons to avoid

-
Some may want more than 20MP
-
Small sensor

Where the Lumix GH6 and GH5 II are top choices if video is your speciality, the Lumix G9 is perfect for stills photographers first and videographers second. It's a hefty DSLR style camera that handles well with bigger lenses, and it's weatherproof too. There's an 80MP composite mode if the regular 20MP isn't enough, plus 4K video at up to 60p, 20fps continuous shooting, a 6K Photo mode producing 18MP images from high-speed image capture, and a zero-black OLED viewfinder. As we noted in our review, you get a lot for your money with this camera, especially now the price has dropped.

Read more: Panasonic Lumix G9 review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Panasonic Lumix G100

(Image credit: Jon Devo)
Panasonic's new vlogging camera is pretty good at stills too

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3
Lens mount: MFT
Screen: 3-inch vari-angle, 1,840k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69m dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Max video resolution: 4K UHD
User level: Beginner/enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Quality video and stills
+
Audio-recording capabilities
+
Bright EVF and articulated LCD

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body stabilization
-
No headphone jack or USB-C

We like what Panasonic has done with the Lumix G100, making a camera designed for vloggers rather than just offering 4K video to a conventional camera design. We like the vari-angle screen, built-in viewfinder, high-tech three-mic array, the small size and the optional remote tripod grip. When we reviewed the G100, we weren't so keen on the crop factor when shooting 4K video (the viewing angle becomes narrower), and it's also worth noting that there's no in-body stabilisation. But this is still a cute and affordable tool for content creators just starting out.

Read more: Panasonic Lumix G100 review (opens in new tab)

Entry-level MFT cameras

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Olympus OM-D E‑M10 Mark IV

(Image credit: Future)
Our favorite entry-level Olympus gets a great update

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Screen: 3-inch tiltable touchscreen, 1,037K dots
Viewfinder: Electronic 2,360K dots
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 15fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Intermediate/Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
Updated 20MP sensor
+
Flip-down monitor

Reasons to avoid

-
Plastic build
-
No mic port for vloggers

The E-M10 range is priced for beginners and amateurs, though these are really quite powerful cameras with a good selection of features and dual control dials for more hands-on photographers. The Mark IV version brings some modest but important improvements over its predecessor, including a 20MP sensor and a 180-degree flip-down rear screen for selfies and vlogging. We found these features made a real difference in use, as did the improved C-AF precision. Serious enthusiasts should probably look at the E-M5 III instead, but keen novices will find this camera has plenty to keep them busy.

Read more: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Olympus OM-D E-M10 III

(Image credit: Future)
Tiny body with some impressive stills and video features

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 16.1MP
Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
Autofocus: 121-point contrast-detect AF
Viewfinder: EVF, 2,360,000 dots
Screen type: 3-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots
Max burst speed: 8.6fps
Movies: 4K UHD
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in five-axis image stabilisation 
+
Great to have 4K video at this price

Reasons to avoid

-
16MP sensor somewhat dated
-
No huge upgrade over Mark II version

The older E-M10 Mark III remains on sale alongside the Mark IV version, for now. It is cheaper, but not dramatically so, and while the tech is a little older the differences, again, are not large, making this quite a difficult choice. The Mark III does have Olympus's older 16MP sensor, which is a great performer but could leave many users feeling a little twitchy – the Mark IV's 20MP sensor has a more reassuring resolution for this day and age. Even at the time we initially reviewed the camera, we did feel that 16MP was a little behind the times.  Otherwise, though, the older Mark III model is a pretty good deal right now.

Read more: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Panasonic Lumix GX9

(Image credit: Future)
Rangefinder styling in a small, easy-to-use body

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 20.3MP
Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds
Screen: 3in tilting, touchscreen, 1,240,000 dots
Max burst speed: 9fps
Max video resolution: 4K
User level: Beginner

Reasons to buy

+
4K Photo modes
+
Tilting electronic viewfinder

Reasons to avoid

-
Reliance on digital menus
-
Small physical controls

Panasonic has made Micro Four Thirds Lumix G cameras with larger DSLR style bodies and smaller rectangular 'rangefinder' style bodies like this one. The GX9 is a nicely made little camera and pretty powerful too, and current prices don't really reflect its quality. If you want to make to most of its small size, get it with the Panasonic 12-32mm retracting kit lens. It's also available with Panasonic 12-60mm lenses, but both versions of these are quite big – perhaps a little too big for this camera. As we noted in our review, handling isn't really this camera's strong point, and using it involves quite a bit of menu-hunting. However, its image quality is rock solid. 

Read more: Panasonic Lumix GX9 review (opens in new tab)

Best Micro Four Thirds cameras: Panasonic Lumix GX80

(Image credit: Panasonic)

12. Panasonic Lumix GX80 / 85

A great pocket-friendly entry-level Lumix G that also has a viewfinder

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Micro Four Thirds
Megapixels: 16.0MP
Screen: 3.0-inch, 1,040k tilt touch
Viewfinder: Electronic, 2,765k
Lens: Micro Four Thirds
Continuous shooting speed: 8fps (40fps elec shutter)
Max video resolution: 4k
User level: Intermediate

Reasons to buy

+
Compact yet has an electronic viewfinder
+
Advanced features but good value
+
8fps continuous shooting

Reasons to avoid

-
Relatively modest 16MP sensor

The GX85 (GX80 in some territories), is a predecessor to the GX9 with an older, lower-resolution 16MP sensor but a similar combination of small size and powerful features. Panasonic has clearly taken the decision to keep this camera on as a low-cost entry level option, and you certainly do get a lot of camera for your money, especially with some twin-lens deals we've seen in the US. If you're not put off by the 16MP resolution, this is a decent little camera that's being sold at some pretty tempting prices.

How we test cameras

When we test mirrorless cameras such as Micro Four Thirds models, we put them through their paces in both real-world shooting scenarios and carefully controlled lab conditions. The purpose of the lab tests is to get an exact picture of what the sensor can do – we measure resolution using ISO resolution charts, and also use DxO Analyzer test equipment to measure dynamic range and analyse noise. Our real-world testing, meanwhile, assesses how a camera handles in different shooting situations – how easy and intuitive it is to use, and how it stands up to the rigours of day-to-day shooting. Both of these testing methods inform our comments in buying guides. 

Read more:

Best Micro Four Thirds lenses (opens in new tab)
Best Olympus cameras (opens in new tab)
Best Panasonic cameras (opens in new tab)
Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K (opens in new tab)
Best cameras for beginners (opens in new tab)
Best cameras for travel (opens in new tab)
Best mirrorless cameras (opens in new tab)

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