8 unbelievable ways to beat camera shake

8 unbelievable ways to beat camera shake

Although tripods and monopods are the usual tools of choice for supporting a camera and keeping it still, they’re not the only solution. In their latest guest blog post the photo management and Canon Project1709 experts at Photoventure take a look at a few ideas that can help with capturing shake-free images.

1. Beanbag

A beanbag can be incredibly useful to photographers because it can be moulded into shape to hold a subject or support a camera.

It’s rare that you’ll find a dry stone wall that is the perfect shape to rest a camera or lens on, for example, but if you pop a beanbag on top it can make a snug support.

Your camera is protected from the rough edges of the stone and bag levels out the uneven surface to make a stable platform for shooting.

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A beanbag is also useful when you’re shooting from low level and the camera needs propping up a little so the lens is held above any short grass and is directed towards the target.

Many photographers also use a beanbag on top of their camera or lens when using long telephoto optics to help deaden any vibrations resulting from touching the camera or lifting the mirror.

Bean bags can be made very easily and cheaply from a couple of pieces of fabric and a few dry lentils or beans.

If you include a zip or a strip of Velcro you can empty the bag when you’re travelling to make it lighter and fill it at your destination.

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2. Bag on tripod

Even very solid tripods sometimes need a little extra help with keeping a camera steady when there’s a strong wind whistling around the legs and it’s a good idea to add some extra weight.

Some tripods have a hook at the end of the centre column or at the shoulders, which can be used for hanging a weight.

This could be our old friend the beanbag, or a camera-bag can be called into service. Whatever you use, try to hang the weight so that it just reaches the ground.

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This should ensure maximum downward force without allowing it the swing in the breeze and create more problems.

If your tripod doesn’t have a hook it’s often possible to hang a weight over its shoulders.

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