Best lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II in 2024

Best lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II
(Image credit: Canon)

The Canon EOS 6D Mark II is a great camera that fills an important gap in the market. As a full frame model aimed at a market that requires full frame quality but can’t yet justify the expense of some of the higher-end models Canon has available, the Canon EOS 6D Mark II is the best of both worlds in terms of features and value for money. Compatible with EF mount lenses there’s a wide range of glass on offer for the 6D Mark II owner, from wide-zooms, to fast telephoto primes, and specialized prime lenses.

We’ve decided to focus on high quality lenses that produce ultra sharp results to make the most of the detail that the 26.2MP image sensor can capture. The best lenses in this roundup include features like fast, ultrasonic motors for speedy autofocusing to keep the shoot moving, strong image stabilization that steadies the frame whether shooting stills or video, and fast, constant apertures that won’t change through zoom ranges and offer the most versatile options for shooting whether in bright sunshine or dark, low light environments.

Although only the best lenses for the Canon EOS 6D Mark II have made it into our list, we’ve been sure to include different price points for those that want second or third lenses, or who perhaps don’t quite have the budget to splash on this high-end glass. That said, each lens has been perfectly crafted for use this with “entry-level” full-frame camera and takes full advantage of features such as flare-reducing lens coatings, ultra low dispersion elements that prevent chromatic aberration, and aspherical treatments designed to remove distortion issues, especially on zoom lens constructions. So take a look below to find our round up of the best lenses for the Canon EOS 6D Mark II.

Best lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II 

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(Image credit: Sigma)
A bright, sharp standard zoom lens with optical stabilization

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/2.8
Image Stabilization: Yes
Lens Construction: 19 elements in 14 groups
Dimensions: 88 × 107mm
Weight: 1020g
Filter size: 82mm

Reasons to buy

+
Strong optical stabilization in lens
+
Minimal optical aberrations
+
Circular bokeh thanks to lens design

Reasons to avoid

-
Maybe too heavy for some

This standard wide to mid zoom hits all the useful focal lengths a photographer could ask for on a day-by-day basis. Great sharpness throughout the zoom range and a constant f/2.8 aperture keeps images bright even in dark environments. It’s a little heavier than other competitor models but close attention has been paid to this lens by Sigma to reduce optical aberrations and minimize distortion.

Sturdy metal construction means it’s strong and durable and there’s even partial weather sealing to protect it from the elements. A Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM) in the lens makes this all-purpose zoom fast and accurate at autofocusing even in tricky situations. Read our full Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art review.

(Image credit: Canon)
An iconic portrait lens with jaw-dropping shallow depth of field

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/1.4
Image Stabilization: Yes
Lens Construction: 14 elements in 10 groups
Dimensions: 88 x 105mm
Weight: 950g
Filter size: 77mm

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible subject isolation
+
Image stabilization for handheld shots

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy and large for a prime lens
-
Even faster f/1.2 available

A prime focal length that’s known for its ability to create flattering portraits, the 85mm focal length compresses perspectives just enough to smooth out facial features while the shallow f/1.4 aperture isolates subjects beautifully, creating dreamy background bokeh.

Armed with four stops of image stabilization, this lens steadies handheld shooting, which is especially handy in low light conditions when photographers are forced to use longer exposures to counteract the lack of light. Air Sphere Coating (ASC) reduces internal ghosting and flare, and an Ultrasonic Motor keeps autofocus fast and accurate. Read our full Canon EF 85mm F/1.4L IS USM review.

(Image credit: Canon)
The latest version of this classic wide zoom is sharp throughout the zoom range

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/2.8
Image Stabilization: No
Lens Construction: 16 elements in 11 groups
Dimensions: 88 x 127mm
Weight: 790g
Filter size: 82mm

Reasons to buy

+
Sharp throughout the zoom range
+
Constant wide aperture

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive option, better for pros
-
A little heavier than other wide zooms

The third lens in the line of this classic wide angle zoom, we think the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM is the best yet. L-series quality brings sharpness to the entire zoom range with minimal chromatic aberration and distortion due to the Glass Moulded (GMo) lenses and Ultra Low Dispersion elements inside. Ideal for landscapes, real estate, even environmental portraits, it’s a versatile lens that can shoot in the dark thanks to its bright f/2.8 constant aperture.

A rugged build and excellent weather sealing makes this ideal for professional photographers, and amateurs who can afford it, to take with them on their next adventure no matter the weather conditions. See our full Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM review.

(Image credit: Canon)
An excellent telephoto zoom stabilized with strong IS for handheld shooting

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/2.8
Image Stabilization: Yes
Lens Construction: 23 elements in 19 groups
Dimensions: 88 x 199mm
Weight: 1480g
Filter size: 77mm

Reasons to buy

+
Fast, constant aperture
+
Versatile zoom range for different subjects

Reasons to avoid

-
There are cheaper telezooms available
-
Beginners may find it a little heavy

Ever useful, the 70-200mm telephoto zoom range is a standard across all lens manufacturers. It’s suited to a wide range of assignments from portraits to gig photography, and the longer end might have become unwieldy for all but the steadiest hands unless this L-series version came with 3.5 stops of image stabilization.

Flare and ghosting is attenuated on this 70-200mm by the use of a Fluorite coating and Ultra Low Dispersion elements. Fully weather sealed, it's happy being shot in the rain, on a dusty beach, or sitting amongst the snow up the mountain. See our full Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM review.

(Image credit: Canon)
Canon's best value macro lens, now with image stabilization

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/2.8
Image Stabilization: Yes
Lens Construction: 15 elements in 12 groups
Dimensions: 77 x 123mm
Weight: 625g
Filter size: 67mm

Reasons to buy

+
Can also be used as portrait lens
+
Four stops of image stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Cheaper macro lenses are available
-
Reduced IS at higher magnifications

The long focal length gives the EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM macro lens a usable working distance for those who like to photograph bugs and other skittish wildlife, with a minimum focusing distance of 30cm. Image stabilization stabilizes shooting by up to four stops, which drops to 3 stops at 0.5x magnification and 2 stops at 1.0x magnification.

It has the ability to focus to infinity so it can be used as a general telephoto prime lens too. At 100mm it’s ideal for portraiture because when paired with the wide aperture of f/2.8 it can produce shallow depth of field and satisfying subject isolation. See our full Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM review.

(Image credit: Canon)
A budget-friendly all-rounder, and an ideal 'nifty fifty'

Specifications

Maximum aperture: f/1.4
Image Stabilization: No
Lens Construction: 7 elements in 6 groups
Dimensions: 73 x 50mm
Weight: 290g
Filter size: 58mm

Reasons to buy

+
Good value for money
+
Wide maximum aperture for nice bokeh
+
A sharp all-purpose lens

Reasons to avoid

-
The Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 is cheaper

A nifty fifty, indeed, this f/1.4 version is the best value for money 50mm prime that Canon makes. Great as an all-purpose lens, it can shoot just about any kind of genre imaginable, with the wide aperture (and subsequent shallow depth of field) being ideal for low light, and a minimum focusing distance of 45cm lending itself well to detail shots.

Being a prime lens photographers will have to compose with their feet as there’s no zoom, but its low price point means that pros and amateurs alike can enjoy its satisfying optical character without breaking the bank. See our full Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM review.

(Image credit: Future)
Super wide-angle and fast - this is a great lens for night landscapes

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Max angle of view (diagonal): 114 degrees (Full-frame)
Dimensions (WxL): 87x106mm
Weight: 791g

Reasons to buy

+
Generous viewing angle
+
Superb image quality
+
Good build and handling

Reasons to avoid

-
No image stabilization
-
Manual focus only

Sold as the Rokinon SP 14mm f/2.4 in North America, this ultra-wide prime is an ideal choice for interiors or for shooting nightscapes. The high-quality glass is neatly wrapped in a really solid casing. The rubberized manual focus ring gives a very assured grip and has a long rotational travel with a fluid feel. There’s no weather-seal ring on the mounting plate to guard against the ingress of dust and moisture. To be fair, though, if you’re photographing the Milky Way, you’ll need clear, dry and dust-free conditions.

In our review, we were hugely impressed by how well this lens maintained its image quality when wide open, which is hugely important for astrophotography. It's markedly better than the alternative Irix 15mm f/2.4 Blackstone lens or a Sigma 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM Art. Sharpness is both very good and extremely consistent across the image frame. See our full Samyang XP 14mm f/2.4 review.

(Image credit: SSigma)

8: Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC Art HSM

The world’s first f/1.8 constant aperture zoom

Specifications

Maximum aperture: Constant f/1.8
Image Stabilization: No
Lens construction: 17 elements in 12 groups
Dimensions: 78 x 121mm
Weight: 810g
Filter size: 72mm

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible constant wide aperture
+
Wonderfully smooth bokeh character 

Reasons to avoid

-
No image stabilization
-
Vignetting when shot wide open

Although nearly a decade old, this versatile ultra-wide angle lens was the world’s first f/1.8 constant aperture zoom lens for DSLRs and absolutely smashes low-light performance. Typically, those who wanted to shoot apertures as fast as this would typically need to swap out their wide-zoom for a prime lens, but this lens offers greater flexibility in many shooting scenarios, especially for interior and astrophotography.

Minimum focusing distance of 28cm means close-up subjects aren’t out of reach. It has improved durability through its tough brass bayonet mount. The HSM (Hyper Sonic Motor) ensures quiet, speedy autofocusing. A rounded 9-blade diaphragm in the lens prevents unwanted light source bursts and instead offers beautifully smooth bokeh.

(Image credit: Sigma)
The best lightweight hyper-telephoto zoom lens

Specifications

Aperture range: f/5-6.3
Image Stabilization: Yes
Lens construction:: 20 elements in 14 groups
Dimensions: 105 × 260mm
Weight: 1930g
Filter size: 95mm

Reasons to buy

+
Four stops of Optical Stabilization in lens
+
Beastly 150-600mm focal length range 

Reasons to avoid

-
Restrictive aperture range throughout zoom
-
Compact but still a heavy lens

Hyper-telephotos are rarely small, but Sigma has done a good job at keeping this lens under the 2kg wire at just 1930g. It’s also not overly large to handle either, but definitely much larger than many other, more typical telephotos. 

Photographers favoring handheld shooting should be aware of the slower maximum aperture of f/6.3 when zoomed in to 600mm but four stops of Optical Stabilization remediates this somewhat. In order to fit all of that glass inside and keep things sharp and clean the front element has had to grow to a massive 95mm, so get ready to shell out for some more filters if you opt for this lens. Also consider Sigma's more robust Sport version of this lens, the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S.

See also: Best 150-600mm lensesSigma 150-600 Contemporary vs Sports

How we test lenses

We test lenses using both real world sample images and lab tests. Our lab tests are carried out scientifically in controlled conditions using the Imatest testing suite, which consists of custom charts and analysis software that measures resolution in line widths/picture height, a measurement widely used in lens and camera testing. We find the combination of lab and real-word testing works best, as each reveals different qualities and characteristics.

Read more:

Best Canon lenses

Best 150-600mm lenses

Best 100-400mm lenses

Best macro lenses

Best lenses for Canon 5D Mark IV

Best lenses for Canon EOS Rebel T6 and T7

Best lenses for Canon EOS 90D & EOS 80D

Best lenses for the Canon R5

Jase Parnell-Brookes

Jase Parnell-Brookes is an award-winning photographer, educator and writer based in the UK. They won the Gold Prize award in the Nikon Photo Contest 2018/19 and was named Digital Photographer of the Year in 2014. After completing their Masters Jase has spent a good chunk of two decades studying and working in photography and optics shooting and writing all over the world for big-name brands and media outlets. Now the Channel Editor for Cameras and Skywatching at Space.com their speciality is in low light optics and camera systems.