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    Tamron 14-150mm Micro Four Thirds lens (28-300mm equivalent) revealed

    | News | 29/01/2013 11:56am
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    Tamron has announced the company’s first Micro Four Thirds high-power zoom lens, the Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Di III VC.

    The new Tamron Micro Four Thirds zoom lens offers a focal length equivalent to 28-300mm in 35mm / full-frame format.

    Tamron 14-150mm Micro Four Thirds lens officially revealed

    The Tamron 14-150mm Micro Four Thirds lens also features one Low Dispersion (LD) glass element, two molded-glass aspherical elements and one hybrid aspherical element, which Tamron says thoroughly compensates for aberrations.

    Compact and lightweight at 350g, the Tamron 14-150mm comes equipped with the company’s own Vibration Compensation mechanism, which helps reduce blur caused by camera shake and allowing photographers to shoot handheld or film video.

    The new Tamron Micro Four Thirds lens’ metal barrel exterior is available i black and silver, and the optic offers a filter diameter of just 52mm.

    The Tamron 14-150mm Micro Four Thirds lens’ price and release date were not available at the time of writing.

    Tamron 14-150mm f/3.5-5.8 Specifications

    Focal length: 14-150mm
    (equivalent to 28-300mm in the 35mm/full-frame format)
    Maximum aperture: F/3.5-5.8
    Angle of view (diagonal): 75˚-8˚ 02´
    Lens construction: 17 elements in 13 groups
    Minimum focus distance: 0.5m (19.7 in.)
    Maximum magnification ratio: 1:3.8 (at f=150mm: MFD 0.5m)
    Filter size: 52mm
    Length*1: 80.4mm (3.2 in.)
    Entire Length*2: 85.24mm (3.4 in.)
    Diameter: 63mm
    Weight: 350 g (12.3 oz.)
    No. of diaphragm blades: 7 (Circular diaphragm)
    Minimum aperture: F/22
    Standard accessory: Flower-shaped lens hood
    Compatible mount: Micro Four Thirds

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    Posted on Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 at 11:56 am under News.

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