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The best Mac keyboard in 2022 for Mac Mini, Mac Studio, iMac or MacBook

best Mac keyboard: Man typing on K860 keyboard on desk
(Image credit: Logitech)

The best Mac keyboard might cost a little more, but it's a very worthwhile investment indeed. Consider the number of hours you spend typing at your Mac, and you'll realize how spending a little bit more will pay off over time, in terms of both health and productivity. 

A decent Mac keyboard will feel comfortable to type on, even during long sessions. It will pair with your Mac wirelessly, so you don't have lots of trailing wires cluttering up the place. And it will be light, compact, and nice to look at. 

All the Mac keyboards on our list fulfill these criteria. Beyond that, some offer extra features such as backlighting and programmable keys. And we'll give you all the facts and figures you need to choose between them.

The best Mac keyboard in 2022

Editor's Choice

(Image credit: Logitech)

1. Logitech MX Keys

The best Mac keyboard overall

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.15 or later
Dimensions: 131 x 432 x 20mm
Weight: 810g

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable to use
+
Customisable keys
+
Great backlighting

Reasons to avoid

-
No tilt option

The best Apple accessories aren't always the official ones from Apple. And that's certainly the case when it comes to keyboards. This device from Logitech isn't just cheaper than Apple's Magic Keyboard, it's superior too. Why? Because it has more comfortable keys, it's more customizable, and it has neat backlighting too. 

For us, the killer feature is the ability to remap any and all of the F-row keys, as well as others, to operations that particularly suit your workflow. That can really save you time and energy over the long term, especially if you primarily use your Mac for work. We also like how you can turn off the backlighting to save battery life, and that there's a number pad for those long spreadsheet sessions.

All this makes this the best Mac keyboard for Mac Mini, the best Mac keyboard for MacBook users, the best Mac keyboard for Mac Studio… you get the picture. In short, whatever Mac you have, this is our top recommendation.

(Image credit: Logitech)

2. Logitech K380

The best cheap Mac keyboard

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.10 or later
Dimensions: ‎124 x 279 x 16mm
Weight: 423g

Reasons to buy

+
Great value 
+
Light and portable 
+
Nice keys

Reasons to avoid

-
Batteries not rechargable

If money is tight, then check out the Logitech K380, the best cheap Mac keyboard you can get right now. Its circular keys look great, and have a slight curvature that makes them very comfortable to type on. It can pair with up to three devices via Bluetooth, and it's lightweight and slim, making it very portable. 

On the downside, this keyboard runs on two AAA batteries (included), rather than rechargeable ones. Also there's no backlighting, no number pad, and only very limited customisation. However at this low price, you're still getting a quite excellent keyboard overall.

(Image credit: Apple)

3. Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID

The best Mac keyboard for fingerprint unlocking

Specifications

Compatible with: MacBook Air (M1, 2020), MacBook Pro (14-inch, 2021), MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2021), MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020), iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021), Mac Studio (2022), Mac mini (M1, 2020)
Dimensions: 293 x 128 x 19mm
Weight: 243g

Reasons to buy

+
Supports Touch ID 
+
Official product
+
Tactile keys

Reasons to avoid

-
No backlight or number pad

If you have one of the latest M1 Macs, such as the Mac Studio (opens in new tab) or the 2020 Mac mini (opens in new tab), you'll have a fingerprint sensor called Touch ID. It's a quick, easy and super-secure way to turn on your Mac, and so you'll want a keyboard that supports it. To oblige that wish, the latest version of Apple's Magic Keyboard comes with Touch ID, and as you'd expect, it works brilliantly and effortlessly. 

Even if you're not bothered about Touch ID, though, this wireless and rechargeable keyboard is well worth considering. It comes with all the streamlined aesthetics Apple is known for, offers a first-class typing experience, and it's an improvement (albeit a subtle one) on the 2017 version of the Apple Magic Keyboard, number 8 on our list. The main changes are that the keys are more tactile and new shortcut keys have been added.

More broadly, this keyboard comes with all the advantages of an official Apple product; there's no question that it will play nicely with your Mac. Note, though, that there's no backlight or number pad.

(Image credit: Logitech)

4. Logitech Craft

The best Mac keyboard with a control wheel

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.15 or later
Dimensions: ‎131.5 x 432 x 20.5mm
Weight: 810g

Reasons to buy

+
Useful control wheel 
+
Comfortable keys 
+
Great backlighting

Reasons to avoid

-
Not all software supported

Do you spend a lot of time with creative software, doing tasks like photo and video editing? Then you may find a control wheel will save you time and improve your creativity. In which case, our top recommendation is the Logitech Craft Illuminated Wireless Keyboard.

Its control wheel – a dial in the top-left corner – adapts to the app you're using, and lets you make tiny adjustments, very easily, to images, videos and graphics. It might take a little time to set up, but it can save you a lot of time and frustration compared with just clicking the keys. Just be aware that not all software is supported; you're out of luck, for example, if you use GIMP.

More broadly, we love the low-profile scissor keys on this keyboard, which are nice and comfortable to use. You also get a number pad. Plus there's backlighting, which is turned on by proximity sensors, and adjusts automatically to the lighting levels in your room. 

(Image credit: Logitech )

5. Logitech Ergo K860

The best Mac keyboard for ergonomics

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.15 or later
Dimensions: 233 x 456 x 48mm
Weight: 1.16kg

Reasons to buy

+
Ergonomic layout 
+
Wrist wrest 
+
Can be inclined

Reasons to avoid

-
Batteries non-rechargeable

If you do a lot of fast typing every day, you run the risk of developing pain and RSI in the long term. So it's worth thinking about an ergonomic keyboard that's intelligently laid out to reduce the strain on your fingers and improve your posture. 

Our favourite is the Logitech Ergo K860. It's split into two halves, which are set at an angle. It looks quite odd, but it does really make for more comfortable and relaxed typing once you're used to it. We also love the built-in wrist rest, the adjustable legs for setting the keyboard at the best possible angle, and the fact you can reprogramme the function keys. 

The only downside is that this keyboard takes AAA batteries, which can't be recharged. That said, two are included, which are claimed to last up to two years.

(Image credit: Logitech )

6. Logitech MX Keys Mini

The best Mac keyboard for portability

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.15 or later
Dimensions: 132 x 296 x 21mm
Weight: 506g

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and lightweight 
+
Backlighting 
+
Rechargeable batteries

Reasons to avoid

-
No number pad

Looking for a light and portable Mac keyboard you can carry virtually anywhere? Then the Logitech MX Keys Mini is our top choice. 

It's a similar size and weight to our budget pick, Logitech K380 (number two on our list), but it's a better keyboard overall. Most notably, it takes rechargeable batteries rather than disposable ones, it has good backlighting, and you can remap more of the keys. 

In general, this keyboard offers a great typing experience, and the backlighting turns on automatically in the dark, and off when you haven't typed in a while. Be warned, though, that there's no number pad.

(Image credit: Apple)

7. Apple Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad

A Magic Keyboard, but with a number pad and big arrow keys

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 10.12.4 or later
Dimensions: 445 x 129 x 20mm
Weight: 390g

Reasons to buy

+
Number pad 
+
Big arrow keys 
+
Official product

Reasons to avoid

-
No Touch ID support

If you've got a pre-M1 Mac that doesn't support TouchID, then the latest version of Apple's Magic Keyboard (number 3 on our list) will be overkill. And even if you have an M1 Mac, if you're not bothered about using a fingerprint sensor, you may prefer to save cash and buy this earlier Magic Keyboard anyway.

After all, this 2017 version comes with a numeric keypad that will really make life easier if you spend a lot of time typing numbers into spreadsheets. It also has larger arrow keys, which makes it the obvious choice for gamers, and anyone who uses the arrow keys a lot in their day-to-day software workflow.

(Image credit: Apple)

8. Apple Magic Keyboard

The cheapest Magic Keyboard

Specifications

Compatible with: macOS 11.3 or later
Dimensions: 279 x 115 x 11mm
Weight: 239g

Reasons to buy

+
Best value 
+
Magic Keyboard 
+
Small and light

Reasons to avoid

-
No number pad 

Have a pre-M1 Mac and aren't bothered about a number pad or large arrow keys? Then there's an Apple Magic Keyboard for you that's even more affordable. It's much smaller and lighter, too, than the number pad version (number 7) on our list, making it a great choice for portability. And you still get all the sleek Apple looks, perfect compatibility and comfortable typing experience that you'll find throughout the Magic Keyboard range.

Read more:

Best MacBooks (opens in new tab)

Best iMacs (opens in new tab)

Best Mac mouse (opens in new tab)

Best monitor for Mac mini (opens in new tab)

The best Mac webcams (opens in new tab)

The best Mac printers (opens in new tab)

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Tom May is a freelance writer and editor specializing in art, photography, design and travel. He has been editor of Professional Photography magazine, associate editor at Creative Bloq (opens in new tab), and deputy editor at net magazine. He has also worked for a wide range of mainstream titles including The Sun, Radio Times, NME, T3, Heat, Company and Bella.