Skip to main content

ThinkTank Retrospective Backpack 15 keeps all your kit hidden under canvas

ThinkTank Retrospective Backpack 15
(Image credit: ThinkTank)

If you like your camera backpacks to not look like they are carrying photo kit, and you also like a real retro look then the new Retrospective Backpack 15L could be you. It has the appearance of something straight out of an army surplus store – and is designed to carry a serious shooting set-up in subtle manner.

Designed for adventure travel photography, this classic-styled rucksack features rugged yet form-fitting canvas that is treated with durable water repellant to keep out the elements. A zippered security flap under the lid tucks away to provide rapid top access, while the back panel offers full access to your gear – including a 15-inch laptop. 

There is a total of 20 liters of storage, with 15 liters of this enclosed in the main compartment, and a further 5l in a front pocket designed for personal effect.s

A tripod can be attached to the front or the side, there are two water bottle pockets and a seam-sealed rain cover. There is a removable webbing waist belt and an adjustable sternum slider.

(Image credit: ThinkTank)

“The combination of photo and personal gear carry makes the Retrospective Backpack the perfect bag for adventure travel,” said Doug Murdoch, Think Tank CEO and Lead Designer. “It’s a natural addition to the Retrospective shoulder bag series, with all of the style and design details that have made the line so popular.

Available in a pinestone gray-green color, or in black, the pack is designed to take a camera mounted with a 70-200mm f/2.8, with a three or four other lenses or accessories. 

The ThinkTank Retrospective Backpack 15L will be available from March for $249.75 /£229.

Read more:

Chris George

Chris George has worked on Digital Camera World since its launch in 2017. He has been writing about photography, mobile phones, video making and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography. 


His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, which he won the title of Young Photographer of the Year - long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7, and his iPhone 8 Plus RED.