Skip to main content

Royal Society competition shows incredible science & wildlife photography

Royal Society competition shows incredible science & wildlife photography
(Image credit: Morgan Bennett-Smith)

The Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition winners have been announced - and the results list is packed full of science, landscape and wildlife photography that will blow you away. The Royal Society's competition "celebrates the power of photography in capturing scientific phenomena happening all around us, and the role great images play in making science accessible to a wide audience."

The competition opened in early 2019, with the Royal Society asking scientists from all around the world to send in their photos in the categories of Astronomy, Behavior, Earth Science and Climatology, Ecology and Environmental Science, and Micro-imaging. They were flooded with hundreds of incredible images ranging from dramatic astro vistas to jaw-dropping wildlife photography. 

Read more: Best macro lenses

The judges chose lucky photographer Aleks Labuda in the Micro-imaging category as their pick for the winner of the Royal Society Publishing Photography Competition. His image, 'Quantum Droplets', was chosen as "in the best tradition of great science photos, the viewer is simultaneously bewildered by the image and then astounded by the story behind it”.

Aleks Labuda won the competition with his 'Quantum droplets' image

Aleks Labuda won the competition with his 'Quantum droplets' image (Image credit: Aleks Labuda)

Aleks Labuda says, "This photograph represents experimental proof of the theoretical work in the field of hydrodynamic quantum analogs. These silicone oil droplets are bouncing indefinitely above a vibrating pool of silicone oil at 15 Hz… This behavior provides measurable and intuitive insight into the mystery of particle-wave duality". 

Labuda captured this fascinating image using a Nikon D700 with a 105mm focal length set to 1/200mm and ISO 200. However, he wasn't the only photographer who impressed the judges. Other category winners include Mikhail Kapychka, who captured a lunar halo over a forest in Belarus, and Morgan Bennett-Smith, who shot some beautiful wildlife photography depicting a juvenile Red Sea clownfish.

You can check out more the incredible science, landscape and wildlife photography below or at the Royal Society's website. If you're interested in submitting your own work in 2020, keep a keen eye on their competition page

(Image credit: Abhijeet Bayani)

'Halo' by Mikhail Kapychka, Astronomy Winner

'Halo' by Mikhail Kapychka, Astronomy Winner (Image credit: Mikhail Kapychka)

'Mudskipper turf war' by Daniel Field, Behavior Winner

'Mudskipper turf war' by Daniel Field, Behavior Winner (Image credit: Daniel Field)

'Taranaki Stars' by James Orr, Astronomy Runner up

'Taranaki Stars' by James Orr, Astronomy Runner up (Image credit: James Orr)

'Jellyfish association' by Eduardo Sampaio, Behavior Runner up

'Jellyfish association' by Eduardo Sampaio, Behavior Runner up (Image credit: Eduardo Sampaio)

'Magnetostatic spawn' by Aleks Labuda, Micro-imaging Runner up

'Magnetostatic spawn' by Aleks Labuda, Micro-imaging Runner up (Image credit: Aleks Labuda)

'Fade to white' by Morgan Bennett-Smith, Ecology and Environmental science Winner

'Fade to white' by Morgan Bennett-Smith, Ecology and Environmental science Winner (Image credit: Morgan Bennett-Smith)

'Twister in the Yukon' by Lauren Marchant, Earth Science and Climatology Winner

'Twister in the Yukon' by Lauren Marchant, Earth Science and Climatology Winner (Image credit: Lauren Marchant)

Read more

Best Canon lenses in 2019: go longer, wider and closer with your Canon camera
Best Nikon lenses in 2019: expand your Nikon system with these lenses
Best mini tripods: tabletop camera supports that'll fit in any kit bag