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Her Majesty's Secret Service joins Instagram so we can spy on the spies

The UK's national security service MI5 has stepped out of the shadows and joined the Instagram with the aim of lifting the lid on what it’s really like to work in British Intelligence. 

MI5’s social media content will bust popular myths about its work, explain the world of intelligence, promote career opportunities, and bring to life events in MI5’s 112-year history. We are told to expect interactive content, including the opportunity to engage in Q&As with intelligence officers. 

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The first of its Instagram post shows a super-wideangle worm's eye view of the interior of the MI5's headquarters in Vauxhall, London – showing us scene that the public certainly doesn't usually see.

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Recently-appointed Director General Ken McCallum explained: "If I want one thing to characterize my tenure in this role, it’s for MI5 to open up and reach out in new ways. Much of what we do needs to remain invisible, but what we are doesn't have to be. In fact, opening up will be key to our future success".

In early 2020, MI5 was the subject of a fly-on-the-wall documentary with ITV (opens in new tab); the first time the organization had allowed television cameras inside its headquarters to follow the work of counter-terrorist investigators. 

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Chris George has worked on Digital Camera World since its launch in 2017. He has been writing about photography, mobile phones, video making and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography. 


His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, with which he won the title of Young Photographer of the Year - long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7, and his iPhone 11 Pro.


He has written about technology for countless publications and websites including The Sunday Times Magazine, The Daily Telegraph, Dorling Kindersley, What Cellphone, T3 and Techradar.