Adobe Lightroom: everything you need to know about the ‘alternative Photoshop’

Adobe Lightroom: what every photographer must know about the 'alternative Photoshop'

Adobe Lightroom: how to speed up your workflow with the Quick Develop tools

In this section we show you how to streamline your photo editing process using the Quick Develop tools

The Quick Develop panel, found in the Adobe Lightroom Library module, allows photographers to make quick edits, applying image colour and tone adjustments without having to leave the Library module.

Any edits made using the Quick Develop tools are recorded in the History panel of the Adobe Lightroom Develop module and can always be reversed.

Below we introduce the panel and what it can do for you, as well as show its range of creative effects.

Adobe Lightroom: speed up your workflow with the Quick Develop tools

White Balance
Choose As Shot to use the settings embedded by the camera, or choose one of Lightroom’s presets from the menu (raw format files only). You can also adjust the Temperature and Tint values manually.

Tone Control
Use Auto Tone or adjust the settings manually. Single-arrow buttons make small adjustments, double-arrow buttons make large ones. Note the Reset All button at the bottom.

Saved Preset
Use this menu to choose one of Adobe Lightroom’s preset Develop effects – they’re the same as the ones in the full Develop module, organised into groups. You can also change the Crop Ratio to suit different screen or paper sizes.

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Aged photo

Aged Photo
This reduces the saturation, applies a warm tint and makes adjustments to the tonal controls to achieve a ‘retro’ look.

 

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Bleach bypass

Bleach Bypass
Creates a high-contrast, cold, undersaturated and high-definition look that could be good for urban landscapes or male portraits.

 

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Cross Process

Cross Process 1-3
Simulates the effect of processing film in the ‘wrong’ chemicals and produces varying colour shifts according to which one is chosen.

 

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Direct Positive

Direct Positive
Produces a high-contrast, high-saturation look reminiscent of low-speed transparency films, and can give colour shots extra impact.

 

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Black & White

B&W Look 1-5
Delivers an instant black and white conversion in five different styles – you can try them all to find the look that you want.

 

Visualising the Adobe Lightroom Quick Develop effects: Sepia

B&W Sepia Tone
The classic black and white toned effect, but delivered with more subtlety and control than the sepia ‘effects’ in other programs.

PAGE 1: What Adobe Lightroom offers photographers
PAGE 2: Getting to know the Adobe Lightroom interface
PAGE 3: 3 things you need to know about the Adobe Lightroom Metadata Panels
PAGE 4: Adobe Lightroom Library Module – Folders and Collections

PAGE 5: Adobe Lightroom Library Module – Filter Bar
PAGE 6: Adobe Lightroom Library Module – Flags, Ratings and Labels
PAGE 7: Getting to know the Adobe Lightroom Develop module interface
PAGE 8: Making selective adjustments in the Develop module
PAGE 9: New sharing options in Adobe Lightroom 4
PAGE 10: How to create a website in Adobe Lightroom
PAGE 11: How to make a slideshow in Adobe Lightroom
PAGE 12: How to make books in Adobe Lightroom
PAGE 13: How to speed up your workflow using the Quick Develop tools
PAGE 14: All your options for printing photos in Adobe Lightroom

READ MORE

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  • jmeyer

    You’re right – thanks for pointing that out. Looks like we uploaded the wrong version of the infographic. This has now been fixed and it should be much more readable.