The Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S is now available for pre-order

(Image credit: Nikon)

Nikon continues to build its full frame mirrorless Nikon Z system, with its fifth native lens for the Z mount. The Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S is a comparatively light and affordable prime portrait lens that Nikon says can nevertheless ‘outshine’ previous f/1.4 lenses. 

We knew this was on the Nikon Z lens roadmap (opens in new tab), but now we have a delivery date. You can already use Nikon’s regular DSLR lenses with the Nikon Z 6 (opens in new tab) and Nikon Z 7 (opens in new tab) via the Nikon FTZ Mount Adaptor, but the native Nikkor Z lenses are smaller, lighter and optimised for Nikon’s mirrorless cameras.

This will be useful boost for the Nikon Z range. The Z 6 and Z 7 are great cameras that already feature in our list of the best mirrorless cameras (opens in new tab), not to mention the best cameras for professionals (opens in new tab), but like any expert system they also need the backing of an extensive lens range – so the addition of the Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S will bring that a step closer.

(Image credit: Nikon)

Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S specifications

85mm is considered the classic focal length for portraits because it allows you stand far enough back to avoid any distortion of your subject’s features, but not so far away that shooting indoors becomes difficult.

The f/1.8 maximum aperture allows very shallow depth of field with the camera focused tightly on the subject’s face while the background is blurred. F/1.8 is not as ‘fast’ as the many f/14 lenses already out there (and some f/1.2 lenses like the amazing Canon RF 85mm F1.2L USM (opens in new tab)), so in theory it won’t produce quite the same degree of background blur as more expensive rival lenses, but the new lens does have a size and weight advantage that could make longer portrait shoots and social photography a lot less tiring.

The optical construction includes 12 elements in 8 groups, including two ED (extra low dispersion) elements. The Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S uses an internal focus system with a minimum focus distance of 0.8m, and works perfectly with the latest eye-detection AF updates for Nikon Z cameras.

The Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S uses Nikon’s Nano Crystal Coatings to reduce flare when shooting into the light, and 9 rounded aperture blades for smoothly rendered bokeh. Like other Nikon Z lenses it has a customisable control ring that can be used for manual focus but also silent aperture (iris) control while filming or exposure compensation. The new lens is also sealed against dust and moisture.

Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S price and availability

The Nikkor Z 85mm f/1.8 S is available for pre-order now at $797/£799, and expected to start shipping on September 5 2019.

Read more:

• These are the best mirrorless cameras (opens in new tab) you can buy today
• How to choose the best camera for professionals (opens in new tab)
• The Nikon Z lens roadmap (opens in new tab): what's coming for Nikon's new system and when

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Rod Lawton
Contributor

Rod is an independent photography journalist and editor, and a long-standing Digital Camera World contributor, having previously worked as DCW's Group Reviews editor. Before that he has been technique editor on N-Photo, Head of Testing for the photography division and Camera Channel editor on TechRadar, as well as contributing to many other publications. He has been writing about photography technique, photo editing and digital cameras since they first appeared, and before that began his career writing about film photography. He has used and reviewed practically every interchangeable lens camera launched in the past 20 years, from entry-level DSLRs to medium format cameras, together with lenses, tripods, gimbals, light meters, camera bags and more. Rod has his own camera gear blog at fotovolo.com (opens in new tab) but also writes about photo-editing applications and techniques at lifeafterphotoshop.com (opens in new tab)