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Hands on: Fujifilm Fujinon XF150-600mm F5.6-8 R LM OIS WR review

Fujifilm's longest lens for the X-mount offers exceptional reach in a lightweight design that's also quite lightweight on the pocket for a super telephoto

(Image: © Lauren Scott)

Early Verdict

This is a lens that has opened up the playing field when it comes to the X-mount. The professional (or advanced amateur) photographers that Fujifilm is aiming the Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR at don't just want a long lens – they want an easy to carry, affordable and fast focusing long lens. On the whole, the performance is all of these things, and great for the price point. The lens is designed to excel at distance, getting you closer to subjects that are small, speedy or downright elusive. It is a fantastic super telephoto for the X-mount – although if we were dreaming up a specs list we'd have liked it to be faster – and if anything, it proves Fujifilm's dedication to new audiences in wildlife and sports photography.

Pros

  • +

    Amazing range on APS-C sensor

  • +

    5-stop image stabilization mechanism

  • +

    Lightweight design

  • +

    Fast autofocus

Cons

  • -

    Slow maximum aperture

  • -

    Long barrel dimensions

One of the strengths of the Fujifilm X system is its extensive lens collection, but until now, Fujifilm's longest lens for the X-mount has been the XF100-400mmF4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR (opens in new tab). With the release of the high-speed Fujifilm X-H2S – a camera that is aimed at wildlife and sport photographers – the launch of the FUJINON Lens XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR complements the new camera, and the subjects that users will be likely to shoot with it.

The XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR covers the focal length of 229mm – 914mm in equivalent 35mm film terms, but it does also support – noted as a point of awe if nothing else – teleconverters. This means that if you fitted it with the XF2X TC WR, the range would extend to up to 1200mm (equivalent to 1828mm). Not bad for a lens that weighs just 1605g (albeit without the lens hood, lens cap, and tripod collar foot) and costs under £2/$2k! For the sake of a rough comparison (as it isn't an X-mount fit lens) the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S (opens in new tab) weighs around 2,860g.

On paper, this lens should be equally capable of tracking small birds and wildlife to athletes on the sports track. Its mega focal length range expands the versatility of the X-mount system by a long stretch and opens it up as an option to users who might not previously have considered it. But what about the real world use?

We got our hands on a pre-production sample and took it out in the heart of London. Of course, this lens was never intended for getting up close and personal with tourists in the West End, but we were able to test out some of the bells and whistles and get a grip on the handling. Here are our first thoughts...

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)

Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR: Specifications

Focal length: 150-600mm
Angle of view: TBC
Max. aperture: F5.6
Min. aperture: TBC
Lens configuration: 24 lens elements in 17 groups (3 ED and 4 Super ED elements)
Aperture blades: TBC
Minimum focus distance: TBC
Max. magnification: TBC
Dimensions: TBC
Weight: 1605g (lens only)
Filter size: TBC

Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR: Key features

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)

The Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR doesn't extend in and out to zoom, but features an inner zoom to retain balanced handling. An inner focus mechanism drives the AF swiftly and silently thanks to a linear motor, at a quoted speed of just 0.25 seconds.

On the lens barrel itself there's a focus limiter to restrict the focus range, which is useful if you've got a target that's going to stay a certain distance away, plus a SET button that can be used to program the lens to stay at a pre-defined focus distance.

Chromatic aberration (caused when light rays pass through the lens at different points) is often more prevalent in telephoto lenses, and Fujifilm says that the lens' construction of 24 lens elements in 17 groups should suppress axial chromatic aberration. A broadcast-quality coating called HT-EBC has also been applied on all elements to lower light reflectance and reduce aberration further.

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)

As we've already mentioned, the lens can be used alongside Fujifilm's 2x and 1.4x teleconverters, the former of which maxes the focal length range from 300mm to 1200mm on the APS-C sensor (457mm – 1828mm in 35mm film terms).

This is now the longest lens in the Fujifilm line-up, and as such as 600mm the degree of camera shake is too much to be controlled with the camera's in-body image stabilization. Fortunately the XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR sports a "sensing and control system," a mechanism which effectively delivers its own 5-stops of optical image stabilization. We genuinely noticed this in action when we took the lens for a handheld spin, and were surprised at just how sharp the results were at 600mm on a dull and rainy London day.

Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR: Build and handling

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)

The super-telephoto XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR is a non-extending inner zoom, and Fujifilm is particularly marketing its lightweight design – something that's important for pros who are going to be lugging it around a field chasing birds, or chasing (metaphorically) the fastest athletes. 

Despite its length, we were immediately surprised by how at home (and well-balanced) the lens feels when mounted on the new Fujifilm X-H2S. Because of the internal zoom, the barrel has a fairly plain appearance, and there's very little shift in weight distribution throughout the focal length – to keep shooting steady. We were shooting handheld during our (literal) hands on, and found that we could get a stable platform when holding the lens underneath.

Build-wise the lens is made from a magnesium alloy, and it is sturdy but not too cumbersome – without the plastic feel that you get on some longer modern mirrorless lenses in a bid to reduce weight. Thanks to weather-sealing at no less than 19 locations, you should be able to operate the lens in rain, dust and chilly conditions down to -10 degrees Celsius.

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)

Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR: Performance

Sheer reach is the name of the game with the Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR, and on that front, it delivers in spades. The zoom mechanism feels smooth throughout the entire range, and it's near silent, which is exactly what you want if you're stalking skittish wildlife in the field and don't want to alert it to your presence.

The 5-axis stabilization mechanism does a very decent job of keeping shots sharper towards the far end of the zoom range, and our results were acceptable at 600mm even when the light levels were poor – and the rain was pouring too.

Obviously this is a slower lens, at f/5.6-8, so we can't deny that's a very limiting factor in many situations. It means that you need to boost your ISO or slow the shutter to work in challenging light – but when doing the latter, the aforementioned stabilization (made brilliant-er when using a stabilized Fujifilm body) should generally make a difference.

327.6 mm, shot with the Fujifilm X-H2S (Image credit: Lauren Scott)

327.6 mm, shot with the Fujifilm X-H2S (Image credit: Lauren Scott)

The minimum 150mm focal length, shot with a Fujifilm X-H2S (Image credit: Lauren Scott)

294.5 mm focal length, shot with a Fujifilm X-H2S (Image credit: Lauren Scott)

Fujinon XF150-600mm F5.6-8 R LM OIS WR: Early verdict

We still need to run more tests to determine exactly what this lens is capable of – and how the quality compares to other super telephoto lenses in the APS-C category – but let's be honest – this is a lens that has opened up the playing field when it comes to the X-mount. 

The professional (or advanced amateur) photographers that Fujifilm is aiming the Fujinon XF150-600mm F5.6-8 R LM OIS WR at don't just want a long lens – they want an easy to carry, affordable and fast focusing long lens. On the whole, the performance is all of these things, and great for the price point.

The lens is designed to excel at distance, getting you closer to subjects that are small, speedy or downright elusive. It is a fantastic super telephoto for the X-mount – although if we were dreaming up a specs list we'd have liked it to be faster – and if anything, it proves Fujifilm's dedication to new audiences in wildlife and sports photography.

The Fujinon XF150-600mmF5.6-8 R LM OIS WR is due for release in early July, and will retail at $1,899 / £1,899. We'll be bringing you a full review very soon, with lab tests, scores and more test shots with a fully-fledged (not pre-production) lens.

Read more

Fujifilm X-H2S review (opens in new tab)
The best Fujifilm camera (opens in new tab)
The best Fujifilm lenses (opens in new tab)

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Lauren Scott
Lauren Scott

Lauren is the Managing Editor of Digital Camera World, having previously served as Editor of Digital Photographer (opens in new tab) magazine, a practical-focused publication that inspires hobbyists and seasoned pros alike to take truly phenomenal shots and get the best results from their kit. 


An experienced photography journalist who has been covering the industry for over eight years, she has also served as technique editor for both PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine (opens in new tab)PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine and DCW's sister publication, Digital Camera Magazine (opens in new tab)


In addition to techniques and tutorials that enable you to achieve great results from your cameras, lenses, tripods and other photography equipment, Lauren can regularly be found interviewing some of the biggest names in the industry, sharing tips and guides on subjects like landscape and wildlife photography, and raising awareness for subjects such as mental health and women in photography. 

With contributions from