The best Fujifilm cameras in 2024, from X-mount mirrorless to medium format

The best Fujifilm cameras are perfect for photographers who want a stylish retro body as well as the most up-to-date technical features. Thanks to Fujifilm's latest X-Trans sensors and advanced processors, the best Fujifilm cameras have got style and substance – but which is the right model for you?

When choosing the best Fujifilm cameras, you have two different options to choose from. Firstly, the Fujifilm X Series is made up of APS-C mirrorless cameras, with two of my recent favorites being the Fujifilm X-T5 and Fujifilm X-S20. Fujifilm's APS-C cameras use Fuji's X-mount lenses, and you can find our top picks in our guide for the best Fujifilm lenses.

Then there’s the Fujifilm GFX series – high-end medium format cameras that have large sensors and large pixel counts. The latest Fujifilm GFX 100 II was released a few months ago and is the best medium-format camera I have tested to date. GFX cameras use the Fujifilm GF lenses and are ideal for professionals and serious enthusiasts, these are big lenses, but with big image quality!

This list focuses on Fujifilm's digital cameras, but Fujifilm might be best known for its Instax range of instant cameras, check out our best instant camera guide for more on these. 

We have tested and reviewed all of the Fujifilm cameras on this list, and I have put together my top recommendations. With a mix of beginner models and those more suited to experts and professionals, you can find the perfect camera for your needs.

Gareth Bevan headshot
Gareth Bevan

Gareth is the Reviews Editor at Digital Camera World, and the person in charge of approving all the latest camera-related tech. With several years of experience as a photographer and videographer, shooting for some household names, he has learned a thing or two about working with cameras and the photography industry. Outside of this, expect to find him cycling around London, or deep in a Netflix binge.

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The best Fujifilm camera in 2024

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Best Fujifilm camera for style and features

(Image credit: Alistair Campbell)
The best Fujifilm camera with a traditional design

Specifications

Sensor: X-Trans 5 (APS-C)
Megapixels: 40
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Viewfinder: 3.69M-dot OLED EVF, 100fps refresh
Memory card: 2 x SD UHS-II
LCD: 3-inch tilting touchscreen
Max continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Max video resolution: 6.2K/30P

Reasons to buy

+
40MP still images
+
15/20fps continuous shooting
+
Lighter than X-T4

Reasons to avoid

-
Manual dials not for everyone
-
X-H2S is better for speed
-
No 8k video
Buy it if:

✅ You love retro-styled cameras: the Fujifilm X-T5 is a stunning camera that will appeal to anyone who has a love of vintage film cameras but wants the latest digital tech.
✅ You want a do-it-all camera: The X-T5 isn't just for amazing stills, it also shoots great image-stabilized 6K video which makes this one of the prettiest hybrid cameras you can buy.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You don't like the idea of manual dials: the X-T5 has automatic modes, but if you want to shoot any manual photography, you'll need to use the dials, which isn't always the fastest way to get shooting.
❌ You want a bigger sensor: at 40MP, the X-T5 sensor has plenty of resolution, but if you prefer the light gathering and depth of field of a larger full-frame or medium-format sensor then Fujifilm's X-series is not for you.

The Fujifilm X-T5 is the company's latest camera in its hugely popular X-T range. Now I am someone who owns just a few too many vintage film cameras – so naturally I love Fujifilm's X-T range for its incredible classic style, which takes influence from classic cameras from the days of film. The X-T5 features traditional dials on the top of the camera which will help you change ISO and shutter speed settings quickly. But don't let the retro looks fool you, under the hood, the X-T5 is also at the cutting edge for digital camera tech.

Like all X Series cameras, the Fujifilm X-T5 has an APC-C sensor with a massive 40.2MP resolution, which is also capable of recording 10-bit 4:2:2 video at 6.2K/30P, has in-body stabilization for steady shooting, and a 3-way tilting touchscreen for flexible image composition – this is a camera that is ideal for professionals or serious enthusiasts alike. If anyone says that APS-C sensors are fundamentally worse than full-frame, then I would counter with this camera.

After testing the X-T5, I was so blown away by the image quality, video, design, and build of such a compact and lightweight camera that I ended up buying one for myself!

If you are not convinced by the classic body and dials, then I would recommend checking out the similarly specced Fujifilm X-H2 (further down this list). It features the same sensor and processor as the X-T5, but a more modern body without the retro dials which might suit busy pros. You can see our Fujifilm X-T5 vs X-H2 if you're not sure which is right for you.

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FeaturesHigh-resoltion, IBIS, 6K video, what more could you want?★★★★★
DesignBeautiful styling, but the manual dials aren't for everyone ★★★★
PerformanceFantastic image quality and exceptional subject detect autofocus★★★★★
ValueExcellent value for the design and features on offer★★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm X-T5 review

Best Fujifilm camera for video

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)
The best Fujifilm camera for hybrid creators

Specifications

Sensor: X-Trans IV (APS-C)
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3-inch 1.84 million dot vari-angle LCD touchscreen
Viewfinder: 2.36 million dot
Max continuous shooting speed: up to 30fps (1.25x crop) or 20fps (no crop)
Max video resolution: Up to 6K30P 4:2:2 10-bit internal, 4K60P, 1080HD240P

Reasons to buy

+
Small and compact size
+
6K30P video in 4:2:2 10-bit
+
Subject recognition and tracking autofocus
+
Bigger battery
+
Vari-angle screen for vlogging

Reasons to avoid

-
Vlog mode isn’t well explained
-
Increased price over X-S10
Buy it if:

✅ You shoot a lot of video: the Fujifilm X-S20 is made with video in mind, and offers sensational video quality, with open-gate and codecs for filmmakers, and vlogging modes and vertical video for social creators. The X-S20 is also light and compact, so is perfect for rigs and gimbals.
✅ You want a versatile hybrid camera: the X-S20 isn't just all about video, it offers brilliant stills as well, and with access to Fuji's entire X-Mount range of lenses it is versatile enough to handle everything from landscapes to a safari. 

Don't buy it if:

❌ You want big resolution: one of the only real downsides of the X-S20 is its 24MP sensor isn't quite as high as the 40MP sensor found in the X-T5 or X-H2, so if ultimate resolution is your game, then those two cameras might be better choices, although are considerably pricier.
❌ You prefer retro styling: there isn't a retro camera in Fujifilm's range that quite has the same feature set as the X-S20. The X-T5 is the closest, but it is a bigger and more expensive camera. The other retro option – X-T30 II – is aging and can't keep up with the more modern X-S20.

I fell hard for the Fujifilm X-S20 when I tested it. I was just so impressed at the amount of features that Fujifilm had managed to squeeze into its little body – and how little they were charging for it. It's a video camera, it's a stills camera, it is good for travel, or the streets – I think this is probably one of the best cameras on the market right now for a lot of people. 

The X-Trans IV sensor might be the same as the X-S10, but this is no bad thing, as I am still very impressed with the photos today. However, the X-S20 sets itself apart with a big bump from Fuji's new X-Processor 5, which not only brings the best of Fujifilm's pinpoint autofocus recognition and tracking but also video processing that belongs in a more premium-priced camera.

Despite its small and compact size, the X-S20 is a deceptively powerful video camera capable of 6K video with open-gate and numerous codecs for those filmmakers who like to get in-depth with video editing. With subject recognition and tracking in videos including face recognition, and dedicated vlogging features – content creators especially will find a lot to love in the X-S20.

While the camera isn't in Fujifilm's popular classic retro style like the X-T5 or X-T30 II, I still think the camera looks very good, and I found it a joy to use with excellent handling, and it offers more straightforward controls than those two cameras with their all manual dials.

The introductory price is a little higher than the previous X-S20, which might put some people off, although, I think the price bump is justified as for the cost, you are getting a considerably capable camera that punches above its status.

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Features6K open-gate video and the latest subject detection★★★★★
DesignSolid build quality although does miss out of weather sealing★★★★★
PerformanceSubject detect autofocus is pinpoint and video quality is excellent★★★★★
ValueArguably the best value APS-C cameras right now★★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm X-S20 review

Best Fujifilm camera for professionals

(Image credit: Lauren Scott)
The best Fujifilm camera for wildlife and action

Specifications

Sensor: X-Trans 5 (APS-C)
Megapixels: 26.1
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Screen: 3-inch articulating touchscreen, 1.62m dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 5.76m dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 40fps
Max video resolution: 6K

Reasons to buy

+
40fps continuous shooting
+
6K/4K 120p video
+
In-body stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
The price reflects its power
Buy it if:

✅ You love to shoot sports or wildlife: the Fujifilm X-H2S is the best APS-C camera for sheer speed, coupled with fantastic auto-tracking focus with animal and human recognition, you can be sure that you won't miss a single subtle movement.
✅ You also want to shoot pro video: the X-H2S isn't just for stills – it also has incredible 6K video or 4K at 120p, with diverse codecs including Apple ProRes, pro video makers who want to capture footage to easily slot into their editing workflow will find a lot to love.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You want high-resolution stills: the sensor might be totally redesigned for speed, but where it does lack is maximum resolution. But don't fret, Fujifilm has an answer with the X-H2. A nearly identical camera, but the X-H2 swaps a 40fps shutter or a 40MP sensor instead.
❌ You won't get the maximum value: there isn't much point in buying this camera if you aren't going to be holding down the shutter. If you are a considered shooter, or just hate having to sort through near-identical photos, then other cameras like the X-H2 or X-S20 might be for you.

The Fujifilm X-H2S is in our reviewer's opinion "one of the best APS-C hybrid cameras ever made", which is high praise indeed, and an opinion I am inclined to agree with as each time I have used this camera I have left very impressed by the speed and power. 

The X-H2S is the fastest camera in the Fujifilm X-mount range, made for professional and enthusiast sports and wildlife photographers where keeping up with the action is paramount. The X-H2S can shoot at 40fps with minimal screen blackout, alongside its in-body image stabilization to keep those big telephoto lenses even steadier. 

Not just for stills though – the X-H2S can also capture 6K video or 4K at up to 120p, and has a flip-out vari-angle screen, and a 5.76m dot electronic viewfinder.

I love the 1.5x crop factor of APS-C sensors for their ability to get a little closer to the action with smaller-sized optics, and Fujifilm has a well-built-out lens collection with options for every situation from wide to tele, as well as a choice of zooms and primes, so no matter how and what you like to shoot, you're covered.

The X-H2S body is also built for professional handling, with a big chunky grip to easily hold on to while shooting with larger lenses. The X-H2S also has a comfortable button and dial layout for quick controls, with none of the retro dials from Fuji's "cooler" cameras to be found here.

All this additional power however comes at a price, with the X-H2S being the most expensive camera in Fujifilm's APS-C lineup, although the X-H2S offers excellent specs that eclipse its closest rivals in the APS-C space like the Canon EOS R7. Compared to similar full-frame cameras, the X-H2S can look like a bargain!

Swipe to scroll horizontally
FeaturesIncredible autofocus and shooting speeds for sports and wildlife★★★★★
DesignWeather-sealed pro build quality with a top screen★★★★★
PerformanceCombination of autofocus and speed is mind-blowing for fast action★★★★★
ValueFujifilm's priciest APS-C camera but is good value compared to full-frame competition★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm X-H2S review

Best Fujifilm medium format camera overall

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)
The best Fujifilm medium format camera you can buy

Specifications

Sensor: GFX (medium format)
Megapixels: 102MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm G
LCD: 3.2-inch 2-axis touchscreen, 2.36 million dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 8fps
Max video resolution: 8K at 30fps

Reasons to buy

+
102MP quality is sublime
+
Fast burst speed and big buffer
+
Smaller size without built-in grip
+
Image stabilization is excellent

Reasons to avoid

-
Still big and heavy compared to full frame mirrorless
-
All that power doesn't come cheap
Buy it if:

✅ You want to jump into medium format: there are cheaper medium-format cameras, but if you are coming from a top professional full-frame camera to the GFX 100 II then you will likely find absolutely everything you need – but now with more megapixels, more light gathering, and more depth of field.

✅ You need the ultimate resolution: the image quality of the GFX 100 II sensor is just simply sublime, I couldn't believe the difference in quality when comparing it to full frame and APS-C cameras. It also has the option to create 400MP Pixel Shift images for extreme quality.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You want to dip a toe in medium-format: the GFX 100 II is the top camera in Fuji's range, the most expensive, and likely overkill for most photographers. If you are just curious about trying medium-format then I would recommend starting with the GFX 50S II or GFX 100S and working your way up if you need to.

❌ You want a small camera: while medium format cameras have shrunk down a lot since the film days, the GFX 100 II is still a sizeable camera that won't be slipping into any pocket (the lenses are also massive). If you want a camera that is easy to travel with, then I would suggest checking out Fuji's X-Mount range like the X-H2.

To put it plainly, the GFX 100 II is one of my favorite cameras I have reviewed. The image quality from Fujifilm's latest 102MP sensor is simply amazing, and I could not stop pixel-peeping my photos, I was continually amazed by the amount of detail the camera could capture.

Ditching the vertical grip from the previous GFX 100 surprised me with just how easier and more enjoyable the camera is to use, with a body that is the same size as a DSLR or even some larger full-frame mirrorless cameras, and was definitely a smart move by Fuji's design team. Although I am slightly less sold on the new BISHAMON-TEX material replacing the faux leather. 

Despite that massive medium format sensor pushing 102MP of quality, it is also somehow able to offer up to 8fps continuous shooting thanks to a ground-up processor and sensor redesign. The sensor is also backed up with up to 8 stops of IBIS – a feature I now struggle to live without. 

The latest X-Processor 5 also delivers new autofocus capabilities for a sensor of this size, with the ability to recognize and track faces, eyes, animals, and even vehicles very effectively. In testing this with portraits, I found the eye focus spot on every time.

And let's not forget video, the GFX 100 II can offer a top spec of 8k30p. Fujifilm is definitely set on making medium-format a bigger player in cinema, with compatibility with the image circles of popular cine lenses from numerous manufacturers. Video is excellent, but I am not completely convinced that most people should buy a medium-format camera solely for video.

The GFX 100 II should be the catalyst for every full-frame professional portrait, fashion, product, and landscape photographer wavering on jumping to medium format. Fujifilm has thrown everything and the kitchen sink into the camera. The Fujifilm GFX 100 II is not just the best medium format camera around right now, but I think it is one of the best cameras full-stop for professional photographers.

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FeaturesJust about everything – 102MP stills, 8K video, IBIS and somehow 8fps shooting★★★★★
DesignLosing the inbuilt vertical grip makes the camera much smaller, for a medium format camera anyway ★★★★★
PerformanceStills and videos are simple sublime with latest detection autofocus★★★★★
ValueThe most expensive medium format camera in Fuji's arsenal, but much cheaper than rivals★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm GFX 100 II review

Best Fujifilm camera for affordable resolution

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
The best medium format camera with everything, including a competitive price

Specifications

Sensor: GFX (medium format)
Megapixels: 102MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm G
LCD: 3.2-inch 2-axis touchscreen, 2.36 million dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 5fps
Max video resolution: 4K at 30fps

Reasons to buy

+
Surprisingly compact and affordable
+
102MP images
+
Snappy AF performance
+
Improved image stabilization

Reasons to avoid

-
Still heavy for long handheld use
-
8-way joystick takes getting used to
Buy it if:

✅ You want an exceptional value medium format camera: The GFX 100S is very affordable considering its big resolution sensor, the camera is not only priced well below medium format cameras from rivals like Hasselblad but is competitive with similar full-frame models.

✅ You need a lot of pixels: If your work involves producing big prints or detailed archiving then the 102MP in the GFX 100S will be perfect. This can also be expanded to 400 megapixels with Pixel Shift technology for the absolute maximum image quality.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You won't use all those megapixels: 102MP is a lot, it produces big files, that require more storage and more powerful computers for editing. If you don't need all that resolution, then the GFX 50S II is half the megapixel count and might be a better solution.

❌ You shoot a lot of video: While the GFX 100S is capable of 4K30p, medium format is not usually the first choice for video, and many other cameras do it better than the GFX 100S. It's a decent hybrid camera, but if your priority is video, and you love medium format, then look towards the GFX 100 II.

Fujifilm is doing something for medium format photography that no other brand has managed. It's made the luxury of having a 100MP+ sensor more affordable while maintaining incredible image quality, fast autofocus, and a high-end build. 

The GFX 100S comes in a few thousand dollars under the new GFX 100 II, you do miss out on a few top-end specs from the newer model in video, subject detection, and sheer speed, but if you won't make use of them, then I think the GFX 100S is the best value high-resolution camera you can currently buy.

Fujifilm continues to shrink down its medium format cameras, and compared to the original GFX 100 model, the GFX100S has a more compact body while not compromising on sensor resolution or in body image stabilization. If you are holding out for a smaller camera though, I think this might be the limit to how small Fuji can go while still maintaining the GF image circle. 

When it comes to how the camera performs though, I am impressed by the dynamic range, tonality and color depth, sensational resolution, and the ability to crop as much as you need. The GFX 100S's in-body stabilization also enables Pixel-Shift photos of up to a huge 400MP with no false color, which is essential for a lot of professional work.

Somehow, Fujifilm has managed to make a camera that delivers everything the original GFX100 could deliver, only in a smaller body and at not much more than half the price. It's the kind of camera wizardry I live for and there's no surprise it made it into my top picks.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
FeaturesBig 102MP resolution sensor with IBIS but the autofocus is eclipsed by the newer GFX 100 II★★★★★
DesignFujifilm continues to shrink down its medium format cameras although not quite enough for one handed shooting★★★★
PerformanceImage quality is exceptional with the option of 400MP Pixel Shift images★★★★★
ValueConsiderably cheaper than the GFX 100 II the 100S is excellent value for its features★★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm GFX 100S review

Best Fujifilm camera for travel

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
The best compact Fujifilm camera for travel or street photography

Specifications

Sensor: X-Trans IV (APS-C)
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens: 35mm f/2 (effective)
Screen: 3in tilting LCD, 1,620k dots
Viewfinder: Optical + 3,690k-dot EVF
Max continuous shooting speed: 20 / 11fps
Max video resolution: 4K

Reasons to buy

+
Hybrid viewfinder
+
Sumptuous image quality

Reasons to avoid

-
No optical stabilization
-
Pretty pricey
Buy it if:

✅ You want a premium compact camera: The X100V is the king of the hill when it comes to the increasingly narrowing field of compact cameras. If you want a camera that can slip into a pocket but still offers an exceptional camera experience then look no further.

✅ You love retro-inspired cameras: I love the looks of the X100V, it harks back to beautiful rangefinder film cameras from the last century. It's not just looks, the build quality is exceptional, and feels really good in the hand. If you want to look cool on the streets then the X100V is one to check out.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You want to shoot at different focal lengths: The X100V is a fixed-lens camera. This means that the lens cannot be changed, so you are stuck with the 23mm focal length. There are adapters available to alter the perceived focal length but they are expensive with varying results.

❌ You want to shoot lots of video: While the X100V is capable of decent 4K video, it pales in comparison to what is possible on newer Fujifilm cameras. The autofocus is dated with fewer subject and tracking modes, and the lens is slow and not very silent. 

Fujifilm's original X100 was the camera that sparked people's obsession with Fujifilm's retro-styled modern cameras. Five models later, the Fujifilm X100V is still my top choice for anyone who wants a beautiful and premium compact camera without the faff of changing lenses.

The X100V has a fixed lens that is roughly equivalent to 35mm on a full-frame camera – and is my personal focal length of choice for street or travel photography. There are converters available for the X100V to make the lens wide or more tele, but I find these a little overpriced and increasingly hard to find. The lens is very compact, which is great for slipping into a pocket, but it should really come with a lens hood for the price you're paying.

The main downside is the Fujifilm X100V's slick design doesn't come cheap, although the premium quality and cool features like the hybrid viewfinder are about justified. But that's if you can get your hands on one in the first place. The Fujifilm X100V is perpetually out of stock around the world, and has a months-long order list so is not the easiest to buy, but that only demonstrates what an incredible camera this is, and I think it is well worth adding your name to the waiting list.

When it comes to image quality, the X100V has the same 26.1MP X-Trans sensor as the previous flagship-level Fujifilm X-T4, which is still an exceptional sensor today and I am still pleased with the image quality from my own X100V. Although with the X-S20 and X-T5 showing what is possible, the X100V is starting to feel outdated.

Of course, you get access to Fujifilm's beloved film simulations and recipes, taking some of the work out of editing, and are what have made this camera so popular. The wonderful hybrid optical viewfinder is also a major highlight and one of the reasons I am still obsessed with rangefinder cameras as my last-ditch attempt to keep an optical viewfinder in an increasingly mirrorless world.

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Features24MP sensor backed up by Fuji's film simulations but so-so video specs★★★★
DesignGorgeous and well constructed retro inspired body with a hybrid viewfinder to fall in love with★★★★★
PerformanceImage and video quality is great although autofocus isn't as snappy as rivals with a slower lens★★★★
ValueOn the verge of being overpriced but is saved by such a premium build and viewfinder★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm X100V review

Best entry-level medium format Fujifilm camera

(Image credit: Future)
The best Fujifilm camera for getting started in medium format

Specifications

Sensor: GFX (medium format)
Megapixels: 51.4MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm G
Screen: 3.2in three-way tilting touchscreen, 2,360k dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 3.69 million dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 3fps
Max video resolution: Full HD

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable for medium format
+
Ergonomically designed body
+
Stunning images

Reasons to avoid

-
No 4K video
Buy it if:

✅ You want to try medium format: the GFX 50S II is the perfect entry point into medium format with a price that is accessible to most enthusiasts and professionals and enough quality from its 51MP sensor that you should see clear difference over smaller sensor cameras.

✅ You want an affordable way to make big images: the GFX 50S II is the cheapest camera you can buy that is capable of taking images with enough pixels to be blown up for large prints or zoomed-in product shots. You can even bump it up to 200MP with Pixel Shift if you need that extra oomph.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You shoot video: the less said about the video from the GFX 50S II the better. While it does have video, it is limited to only 1080p HD video, which today for most things doesn't really cut it. The autofocus is also rather slow by modern standards.

❌ You don't like carrying big lenses: the GFX 50S II's body has been shrunk down to an impressive size that is competitive with full-frame cameras, but unfortunately, the lenses that have to cover that big medium format sensor have mostly remained the same size, and by that – I mean big.

Fujifilm revolutionized the world of medium format with its mirrorless GFX series of comparatively small and relatively affordable large-sensor cameras. The Fujifilm GFX 50S II I think is perhaps the best distillation of the formula yet – cramming a high-resolution 51.4MP sensor into a body that actually rivals the portability of any other professional camera – DSLR or mirrorless. 

If you are not just content with 51MP, then the GFX 50S II has a Pixel Shift Multi-Shot mode, which combines 16 RAW images to create huge 200MP files. This is done using the new 6.5-stop image stabilization system, which has been improved over the previous GFX cameras and greatly improves the GFX 50S II's real-world usability, as little mistakes show up more in big images. 

The downsides – well the GFX 50S II has a burst rate of just 3fps, and can only shoot Full HD video at 30p, but Fujifilm divined that nobody is buying this camera for its action-shooting or video capabilities. Although it's likely we might see it go in that direction for future models. But the GFX 50S II does what it's designed to do – and does it exceptionally well.

Now probably the thing I find most exciting about the camera is the price. The GFX 50S II undercuts some other big-name professional camera brand's flagship cameras, and sure it can't keep up with them in terms of speed, but with more resolution, it has most of them trumped for image quality.

The GFX 50S II is the perfect entry point into medium format photography, any photographers out there who produce landscape, portrait, product, or still life images will love what this camera offers. With a competitive price and quality-of-life improvements – the GFX 50S II is a real contender against full-frame pro cameras. 

Swipe to scroll horizontally
FeaturesImproved IBIS supports 51MP standard quality or 200MP Pixel Shift images★★★★★
DesignA medium format camera that rivals the size of pro DLSRs and mirrorless models★★★★★
PerformanceFantastic image quality but let down by poor video and shooting speed★★★★
ValueMedium format doesn't get better value than this, its the perfect entry point★★★★★

Read more: Fujifilm GFX 50S II review

Best Fujifilm camera for features and price

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
The best Fujifilm camera overall for features and price

Specifications

Sensor: X-Trans 5 (APS-C)
Megapixels: 40
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
Viewfinder: 5.76-million-dot OLED
Memory card: 1 x CFexpress Type B, 1x SD UHS-II
LCD: Vari-angle touchscreen, 1.62m dots
Max continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Max video resolution: 8K

Reasons to buy

+
40MP still images
+
8K video with long recording times
+
15/20fps continuous shooting

Reasons to avoid

-
Cooling fan is extra
-
X-H2S is better for outright speed
Buy it if:

✅ You want the best Fujifilm camera for video: the X-H2 takes the honor of the highest resolution APS-C camera for video in Fujifilm's X-Series, and the pro-style body makes this the best choice for professional photographers and videographers who need to access controls quickly.

✅ You want practically every feature for amazing value: there isn't much the X-H2 can't do, it excels in stills, video, stabilization, autofocus, subject tracking, and has a great collection of accessible lenses, yet still manages to be exceptional value at under $2k.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You want the best shutter speed: if you are looking for the fastest camera in Fuji's lineup then the X-H2S is the one to look at, with a 40fps shutter speed with minimal blackout it trumps the X-H2. However, to get a faster speed you have to sacrifice some resolution.

❌ You prefer a retro body: the Fujifilm X-T5 also offers the same 40MP sensor and processor as the X-H2, although is limited to just 6K video. However, its beautiful film camera-inspired body might be more appealing to those who prioritize the look of their gear.

The Fujifilm X-H2 is an extremely compelling camera at an equally compelling p