The Canon EOS R7 is faster than the R3! Meet the new APS-C king

Canon EOS R7
(Image credit: Canon)

After months of rumors, the Canon EOS R7 has officially been announced – and with specs including 32.5MP resolution 30fps burst shooting that leave other APS-C cameras in the dust.

The Canon EOS R7 (opens in new tab) is not only the first APS-C camera in the EOS R family of cameras, it is also Canon’s first APS-C camera to feature in-body image stabilization – which is good for up to 8 stops of compensation, depending on the lens. 

• Read our hands-on Canon EOS R7 review (opens in new tab)

Depending on how you look at it, the R7 is either a Canon EOS R5 (opens in new tab) that doesn’t shoot 8K or a Canon EOS R6 (opens in new tab) with more resolution. This powerful new enthusiast body features the manufacturer’s cutting edge Dual Pixel CMOS AF II system, complete with people and animal subject recognition.

In fact, the R7 is actually faster than both the R5 and R6, being able to shoot at 15fps mechanically and 30fps with the electronic shutter – which actually even outdoes the professional Canon EOS R3 (opens in new tab), since it can only shoot 12fps mechanically!

Indeed, the Canon EOS R7 borrows some other features from the R3 – namely vehicle subject detect AF, as well as the Multi Function Accessory Shoe (which delivers 12-pin power and communication to peripherals such as microphones and flash triggers). 

While it’s a 7-series camera, the R7 isn’t a direct replacement for the much loved Canon EOS 7D Mark II (opens in new tab). Rather, it is a combination of the 7D and the Canon EOS 90D (opens in new tab) (though is smaller and lighter), leveraging the 1.6x crop factor and 32.5MP sensor to provide formidable performance particularly for wildlife shooters looking to ‘get closer’ and crop further with their shots. 

The camera features a joystick and a control wheel – the latter of which is redesigned and located in a new position, now surrounding the joystick to the right of the 2.36 million-dot electronic viewfinder. The vari-angle screen is the same as the one seen on the R6, and the camera also has weather sealing on par with the 90D.

The R7 is a powerful option for video, too, offering uncropped 4K 60p, 4K 30p oversampled from 7K, and 1080p 120p – with a claimed 60 minutes shooting before heat build-up becomes an issue. 

C-Log is included in the camera, along with a microphone and headphone jack, 4K timelapse, and a switch to flick between stills and video. The R7 is also equipped for live streaming, and packs two UHS-II SD card slots. 

For the first time in an EOS camera, the R7 includes a Panoramic mode that creates a horizontal or vertical pano image, along with a Panning assist mode (for panning shots) and Raw Burst mode, which can buffer 0.5 seconds of stills when the shutter is half-pressed, so that you never miss a moment. 

The Canon EOS R7 goes on sale 23 June with an RRP of $1,499 / £1,349.99 / AU$2,349 body only, or $1,899 / £1,699.99 / AU$2,899 with the new Canon RF-S 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lens. 

The budget-priced Canon EOS R10 (opens in new tab) brother of the R7 was announced at the same time - see our separate R10 news report. 

Preorder the EOS R7 at B&H (USA) (opens in new tab)
Preorder the EOS R7 at Wex Photo (UK) (opens in new tab)

Read more: 

Best Canon cameras (opens in new tab)
Best Canon RF lenses
(opens in new tab)Best mirrorless cameras (opens in new tab)

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The editor of Digital Camera World, James has 21 years experience as a magazine and web journalist and started working in the photographic industry in 2014 (as an assistant to Damian McGillicuddy, who succeeded David Bailey as Principal Photographer for Olympus). In this time he shot for clients as diverse as Aston Martin Racing, Elinchrom and L'Oréal, in addition to shooting campaigns and product testing for Olympus, and providing training for professionals. This has led him to being a go-to expert for camera and lens reviews, photographic and lighting tutorials, as well as industry analysis, news and rumors for publications such as Digital Camera Magazine (opens in new tab)PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine (opens in new tab)N-Photo: The Nikon Magazine (opens in new tab)Digital Photographer (opens in new tab) and Professional Imagemaker, as well as hosting workshops and demonstrations at The Photography Show (opens in new tab). An Olympus and Canon shooter, he has a wealth of knowledge on cameras of all makes – and a fondness for vintage lenses and instant cameras.