Aurora Aperture produces drop-in filters for mirrorless/DSLR mount adapters

(Image credit: Aurora Aperture)

With more systems that ever in play for photographers, here’s something particularly interesting.

The Aurora Aperture Adapter Mount Format Filters for mirrorless cameras are a collection of filters that affix inside lens mount adapters that serve as a bridge between DSLR lenses and mirrorless cameras. 

The AMF filter sits entirely inside a mount adapter, and they’re particularly useful for ultra-wide lenses, which tend to have bulky front elements and therefore either require special filter adapters or just aren’t compatible with filters at all. These filters are also much smaller than front-mounted versions, helping slim down the kit bag, and according to the makers they will be entirely free from vignetting – a problem that can plague some filters, especially cheaper ones.

Currently supported are the following mount adapters: Canon EF-EOS R, Nikon FTZ mount adapter, Sigma's MC-11 mount adapter for Sony E mount cameras, and Sigma’s MC-21 adapter for L-mount. The types of filter available are as follows: sensor protector (a UV filter), ND in various strengths, graduated ND and light-pollution reduction (LPR). Using them is a simple matter of dropping them into the mount-adapter cavity.

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An ND filter for Canon RF

An ND filter for Canon RF
(Image credit: Aurora Aperture)
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Nikon FTZ

Nikon FTZ
(Image credit: Aurora Aperture)
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Sigma MC-11

Sigma MC-11
(Image credit: Aurora Aperture)

Aurora Aperture says the filters have been treated with multi-layered nano coatings for improved light transmission and colour rendition. The company has form for drop-in filters, having produced drop-in filters for various Canon EF lenses back in 2017.

You can back the Aurora Aperture filters on Kickstarter now – the campaign is running until Sunday August 18th, but has already more than doubled its goal of $16,000 (about £12,848). With filters limited, it’d be worth pledging soon if you’d like to secure one – currently the minimum you can throw down in order to get one is $44 (about £35). The filters are expected to ship in October 2019.

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