Best lenses for Nikon D750, from ultra-wide zooms through to super-telephotos

Best lenses for the Nikon D750
(Image credit: Nikon)

When it was released in 2016, the Nikon D750 was a bit of a game-changer. Rather surprisingly, it outperformed many of Nikon’s other full-frame DSLRs when it came to low-light shooting. It was, and still is, an affordable way into the FX full-frame DSLR line-up and brings with it compatibility with a whole host of FX lenses.

Much cheaper than the Nikon D810, which was the preferred model of pros at the time, the D750 offers great value for money. It has great high ISO image noise handling, which it produces minimally and uniformly across the frame making it ideal for weddings, real estate and astrophotography.

While you can use DX crop-sensor lenses with this camera, users should instead opt for the optically superior FX glass on offer. After all, that’s why anyone would purchase the D750 because there are, now, better performing full-frame DSLRs from Nikon such as the current D850. That, plus the smaller form factor and the fact it’s lighter than most other full-frame models, makes this a portable FX DSLR perfect for a range of photographer types.

We’ll be walking you through our round-up of the best lenses for the Nikon D750, covering a range of options for all kinds of photographers. Whether you need a macro lens that also shoots portraits, an ultra-wide lens for astro, or a general purpose zoom, we’ve got you covered. However, if you’re itching for something that doesn’t appear on our list, check out our best nikon lenses guide. For something with a bit of extra reach, be sure to see our guide to the best 150-600mm lenses

Best lenses for the Nikon D750

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(Image credit: Nikon)
This sharp ultra-wide zoom is perfect for landscapes and astrophotography

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilization: No
Minimum focusing distance: 0.28m
Filter thread: N/A
Weight: 1,000g
Dimensions: 98 x 131.5mm

Reasons to buy

+
Wide field of view
+
Astonishingly sharp and clear

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky and heavy
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Difficult to find filters that fit

Arguably the best ultra-wide DSLR zoom lens you can get for the Nikon D750, the AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED has extra-low dispersion glass and nano crystal coating to reduce color fringing and ghosting.

This super sharp lens is fantastic across the entire frame and is only thwarted by the fact that the protruding front element means filters require a specialist mount and need to be huge. It’s also a little bulky and heavy, but nothing that DSLR owners won’t be used to. Overall, this is an incredible lens. See our full Nikon AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Nikon)
This budget telephoto zoom has Vibration Reduction and is the only one worth getting for the Nikon D750

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilization: 4.5 stops
Minimum focusing distance: 1.2m
Filter thread: 67mm
Weight: 680g
Dimensions: 80.5 x 146mm

Reasons to buy

+
Hefty 4.5 stops of stabilization
+
Flexible telephoto zoom range

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited aperture range
-
Some color fringing present

This 70-300mm telephoto zoom is, for the money, the best performing telezoom available for the Nikon D750, with a whopping 4.5 stops of Vibration Reduction. That means when shooting at the longer end of the focal length range, although the aperture stops down to f/5.6, things stay steady and sharp.

The lens internally focuses which keeps water and dust ingress to a minimum and is ultimately an affordable telephoto zoom with great optical performance. Even though there’s some slight color fringing around the most contrasted of subjects, it’s bright and sharp throughout the frame. See our full Nikon AF-P 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Nikon)
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3. Nikon AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED

A compact, versatile macro lens giving genuine 1:1 reproduction that also works for portraits

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilization: 4 stops
Minimum focusing distance: 0.314m
Filter thread: 62mm
Weight: 750g
Dimensions: 83 x 116mm

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly sharp optical performance
+
Focuses to infinity

Reasons to avoid

-
VR weaker when focusing closer
-
Not the cheapest FX macro lens

This macro lens offers a good balance between close-up focusing and a compact size. Able to be used as a genuine macro lens due to the 1:1 reproduction ratio, this means a subject appears the same size in real life as it does on the image sensor. Not only this, but the lens focuses to infinity which, thanks to the longer 105mm focal length, makes it perfect for portraiture.

It does a massive four-stop Vibration Reduction built-in, but this drops down to three stops when the reproduction ratio reaches 1:2 and two stops when shooting at 1:1. This means that when you really need it for macro work, it’s a little less helpful, but it only makes a difference when shooting small subjects at slower shutter speeds. See our full AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Nikon)
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4. Nikon AF-S 85mm f/1.8G

One of the best portrait lenses, without the price tag of the faster f/1.4

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 7
Stabilization: No
Minimum focusing distance: 0.8m
Filter thread: 67mm
Weight: 350g
Dimensions: 80 x 73mm

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent portrait lens
+
Super fast autofocusing
+
Great value for money

Reasons to avoid

-
Specialized, mainly for portraits

Known for their supreme ability to shoot great portraits, 85mm lenses are sought after for their flattering perspective compression and wide maximum apertures, with this lens being no exception. 

The Nikon AF-S 85mm f/1.8G, while not as fast as the 85mm f/1.4G, offers much better value for money considering its maximum aperture is only marginally narrower. Fast autofocusing and optical characteristics like soft vignetting and gorgeous bokeh make this a favored lens among portrait photographers and more. See our full Nikon AF-S 85mm f/1.8G review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Sigma)
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Sigma’s super-telephoto zoom offers extreme flexibility when it comes to distant subjects

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilization: 4 stops
Minimum focusing distance: 2.6m
Filter thread: 105mm
Weight: 2,860g
Dimensions: 121 x 290mm

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent quality construction
+
Fully weather-sealed

Reasons to avoid

-
Narrow aperture when zoomed in
-
Very big and heavy

If you’re looking for a super-telephoto lens with a handy zoom range, then Sigma’s 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | S is our pick of the bunch, (and there’s quite a few). A step up from their contemporary version of the same focal length, this lens is comparatively larger and contains two FLD (ultra-low dispersion) elements to keep chromatic aberration at bay.

This lens benefits wildlife photographers, or those into aviation or motorsports, or indeed sports of any kind, but due to its size and weight photographers will likely want to pair it with a monopod to take the load off. Check out our full Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Nikon)
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An incredibly useful zoom lens that’s both sharp and fast, ideal for low light

Specifications

Diaphragm blades: 9
Stabilization: 4 stops
Minimum focusing distance: 0.38m
Filter thread: 82mm
Weight: 1,070g
Dimensions: 88 × 154.5mm

Reasons to buy

+
Useful, general purpose focal range
+
Fast aperture great for low light
+
VR minimizes handheld camera shake

Reasons to avoid

-
There are smaller 24-70mm lenses

This list wouldn’t be complete without including the legendary Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR. A real workhorse, it’s fully weather-sealed and feels pretty bulletproof. Supremely sharp through the focal length range and across the frame, it has minimal color fringing thanks to the fluorine coating, which actively repels water, dirt and more.

The fast aperture, when paired with four stops of Vibration Reduction, is a beast in low light and makes it helpful for weddings, indoor events, or even astrophotography. There’s a reason this is one of Nikon’s holy trinity of DSLR lenses.
See the full Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR review (opens in new tab).

(Image credit: Future)
The best prime lens for astrophotography

Specifications

Autofocus: No
Stabilizer: No
Diaphragm blades: 9
Max angle of view (diagonal): 114 degrees (Full-frame)
Dimensions (WxL): 87x106mm
Weight: 791g

Reasons to buy

+
Generous viewing angle
+
Superb image quality
+
Good build and handling

Reasons to avoid

-
Manual focus

Sold as the Rokinon SP 14mm f/2.4 in North America, this is a great super-wide lens for shooting the Milky Way, thanks to its ability to capture a big stretch of the night sky and its wide maximum aperture.

In our review, we were hugely impressed by how well this lens maintained its image quality when wide open, which is hugely important for astrophotography. It's markedly better than the Irix 15mm f/2.4 Blackstone (opens in new tab) lens or a Sigma 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM Art (opens in new tab). Sharpness is both very good and extremely consistent across the image frame. Chromatic aberrations are negligible, while coma and astigmatism are very minimal. Barrel distortion can be visible at close focus distances, but that's not an issue for astrophotography.

Maintaining excellent image quality in a lens' widest aperture for astrophotography is a real challenge in an ultra-wide-angle optic, but this Samyang does exactly that – an admirable achievement.

(Image credit: Future)
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All-but matches Nikon’s top 70-200mm f/2.8, at half the price

Specifications

Mount: Nikon FX
Elements/groups: 24/22
Diaphragm blades: 11
Autofocus: Ultrasonic (ring-type)
Stabilizer: 4 stops
Minimum focus distance: 1.2m
Maximum magnification: 0.21x
Filter thread: 82mm
Dimensions (WxL): 94x203mm
Weight: 1,805g

Reasons to buy

+
Superb features
+
Robust, weather-sealed build
+
Great price

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavier than the competition
-
Non-removable tripod collar

A 70-200mm f/2.8 is a must-have lens for most pros - as it is used by wedding, sports, wildlife and documentary photographers Top-flight Nikon professional photographers may still stay loyal to own-brand Nikon glass and choose the Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8E FL ED VR (opens in new tab), but this Sigma Sports alternative matches the Nikon in almost every aspect of handling, performance and image quality. That’s no mean feat considering that the Sigma is a little over half the price. The optical stabilizer has switchable static and panning modes, the latter working in landscape, portrait, and even diagonally. As we’ve seen in a number of other Sigma lenses, dual ‘Custom’ modes can be switched on. Sharpness and contrast are fabulous throughout the entire zoom range, even when shooting wide open at f/2.8. Autofocus is rapid and accurate, and while it’s big and heavy, it goes extra-large on performance. Read our full Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sport review (opens in new tab).

How we test lenses

We test lenses using both real-world sample images and lab tests. Our lab tests are carried out scientifically in controlled conditions using the Imatest testing suite, which consists of custom charts and analysis software that measures resolution in line widths/picture height, a measurement widely used in lens and camera testing. We find the combination of lab and real-world testing works best, as each reveals different qualities and characteristics.

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Jason Parnell-Brookes

Jason Parnell-Brookes is an Internationally award-winning photographer,  writer, and an optics specialist. He currently serves as the Channel Editor for Cameras and Skywatching over at Space.com and is the former Technique Editor of N-Photo magazine. He won Gold in the Nikon Photo Contest 2018/19 and was named Digital Photographer of the Year in 2014. Jason is a qualified teacher, Masters graduate and works with many high-profile international clients.