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Take a closer look at creepy crawlies and become Bug Photographer of the Year!

Luminar Bug Photography Awards 2020 has £23,000 worth of prizes up for grabs in this new annual macro photo contest
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Have you got an eye for bugs? Or do you like hunting for creepy crawlies with your macro lens? Then this new photography competition could be just the thing to give you the recognition you deserve. The Bug Photography Awards 2020 are being organised by Photocrowd, and are being sponsored by Luminar – and there is a prize pot up for grabs of £23,000 (over $28,000). The competition will raise funds for inverterbrate conservation at the same time through wildlife charity Buglife.

There area ten different categories that you can enter, covering all the main types of bugs that you could aim your camera at. They are:

• Arachids
• Beetles
• Butterflies & moths
• Flies, Bees, Dragonflies & Wasps
• Snails & slugs
• Aquatic bugs
• Extreme close-ups
• Bug homes
• All other bugs
• Mobile phone photography

(Image credit: Photocrowd)

The grand prize and the title of Bug Photographer of the Year will be judged on the basis of five images submitted by the photographer in these categories. The winner will get £2500 in cash, plus a range of other goodies.

Additionally there will be a Young Bug Photographer of the Year, that will be free to enter, and which will be awarded to photographers aged between 13 to 17.

Judges include Germain Greer, broadcaster Nick Baker, nature photographer Ross Hoddinott, extreme macro photographer Levon Biss, and DCW's Chris George.

The competition is open now, with entries closing on 07 September. For full details and how to enter see the Luminar Bug Photography Awards website

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Chris George

Chris George has worked on Digital Camera World since its launch in 2017. He has been writing about photography, mobile phones, video making and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography. 


His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, with which he won the title of Young Photographer of the Year - long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7, and his iPhone 11 Pro.


He has written about technology for countless publications and websites including The Sunday Times Magazine, The Daily Telegraph, Dorling Kindersley, What Cellphone, T3 and Techradar.