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Best backup camera for your vehicle in 2022

Best backup camera
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Looking for the best backup camera for your vehicle? Our guide will help you choose the right one for your budget – and show you where you can find it at the best price today.

It’s a lot easier to backup with a new car; there’s probably a reversing camera built in (in fact it’s now a legal requirement in the USA). It’s not beyond the bounds of possibility that it’ll park itself. 

Only a few years ago, however, it was a very expensive option so most vehicles on the road lack the feature. As a retro-fit things can be much cheaper – plus you don’t need to buy a new car at the same time. For those with multiple cars, it means you can make your reversing experience more consistent, too.

Adding a back-up camera is also a good move on vans and trucks. If you’re the enterprising type and your business is a mobile one, imagine how much easier things could be if you had a camera to help out when making deliveries at unfamiliar locations. Back into someone’s fence and not only will you face damage charges and increased insurance rates but lose customers. Courteously avoid disaster and you’ll impress.

When it comes to fitting, there are different approaches (see our notes below the list). Reversing cameras are typically attached to the top of the license plate, with a cable run to a monitor which you fit on the dash and a shorter one to the reversing light to tell the camera it’s needed. This approach is widely supported, and can be readily fitted by a pro or an enthusiast mechanic, though there are different levels of difficulty on this list. Since dash cams (opens in new tab) that record potential incidents are also a popular option amongst motorists, some combine the functionality. 

Given that up to 30% of collisions are caused by rear-ending, it makes sense to capture evidence this way, so cameras discretely fitted to front and back are ideal. Some even keep recording while you’re parked, helping avoid runaways as well as insurance fraud.

Best back-up cameras in 2022

(Image credit: Auto-Vox)
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1. Auto-Vox V5 Pro

The elegant in-mirror option with two-way dash cam and GPS tagging

Specifications

Video quality: 1080p Full HD front, 1080p Full HD 30fps rear (480x272px monitor)
Viewing angle: 139 degrees
Integrated GPS: Yes
Screen: 9.35” Touchscreen
Activated: Automatic
Connectivity: Wired
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Blends into car design
+
Easier to fit than some
+
Can draw power when car is off

Reasons to avoid

-
More expensive than some

The Auto-Vox V5 is already a great reversing & dash cam, but this ‘Pro’ option is designed to be fitted directly to a car’s fuse box so it really blends into the driving experience. 1080P video might not be the highest resolution available, but the Sony sensors captures good footage which is more than adequate for insurance evaluation. Assuming you supply the maximum 64GB SD card (opens in new tab), that’ll record up to 72 hours, automatically recorded on a loop overwriting the older footage, and adding GPS geodata as it goes.

To use as a simple dash cam, the only cable you’ll need to run is the one from the rear camera to the mirror, but to operate as a back-up camera it also needs to be wired to the reversing light. When you engage reverse and the light comes on, and the device knows to display the rear view on the screen.

The whole mirror replacement is a touchscreen which lets you see 5 lanes and has a lot of handy functions; from split-screen dual view to dragging-and-dropping the reversing guide lines just where you like them once you’ve fitted the camera, and brightness is adjustable (a backlit monitor needs to be much brighter in the day). 

best backup camera: Wolfbox G840HRecommended

(Image credit: Wolfbox)

2. Wolfbox G840H 12” 2.5K

Big rear-view mirror backup camera at a budget price

Specifications

Video quality: 420p monitor (1440p dash cam, 1080p backup cam)
Viewing angle: 110 degrees
Integrated GPS: Yes
Screen: 12”
Activated: Automatically
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Blends into car design
+
Easier to fit than some
+
Can draw power when car is off

Reasons to avoid

-
More expensive than some

The Wolfbox G840H, a refined version of the company’s G840S, incorporates back-up camera, HDR loop recording which benefits from a G-sensor to detect collisions and a Sony Stavis sensor to help ensure license plates are committed to the microSD card. The device’s main strength can be seen as its biggest weakness too; the 12” screen (which attaches to an existing mirror using the rubber bands included in the box) can feel a bit big in a smaller vehicle (but Wolfbox does offer 10” versions). 

We did appreciate the powerful dual core processing, not insignificant here it is important devices which are subject to so much sunshine do not overheat, but also for the more prosaic reason that it makes the touchscreen smooth enough to use (though these things could always be better). Some customers might find the extensive feature list a potential confusion, but for most this is an exciting upgrade.

(Image credit: Yada)
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3. Yada BehindSight BT54860

Best backup camera for pickups with no cable run from back to front

Specifications

Video quality: 420p monitor
Viewing angle: 110 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 5”
Activated: Automatically
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Suction cup to mount the screen
+
Digital wireless video saves a cable run
+
Works when reverse is engaged 

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs 12V (cigarette lighter) socket

Yada actually provide a good range of choices when it comes to monitors, from 2.4-inch options for suction mounting through 3.5 and 4.3 all the way up to this 5-inch. That goes to emphasise the fact that, while size is important, it’s more to do with the space in your vehicle than viewing experience. If you have a big-ish family car, 5-inches (plus bezel) won’t obscure too much of your forward view so it’s a good choice.

Useful for many are Yada’s fitting assistance efforts, including videos, a toll-free helpline (in the USA) and their catalogue of professional installers, so fitting shouldn’t be a chore, and the system is 12 or 24V compatible and, once fitted, is triggered automatically by reverse gear. These are the benefits of an established brand and model (the downside is newer designs have higher resolution, but this has all the important features).

The 2.4GHz digital wireless transmission works through the vehicle but doesn’t really have the range to go at the back of a trailer too. The slightly chunky IP67 camera works in most weather conditions but you should look elsewhere if you expect to face extremes regularly rather than face the risk of the camera fracturing over time. You might also find that, although wireless is convenient to fit, there is a lag between engaging reverse and the monitor detecting & displaying the video signal.

(Image credit: Auto-Vox)
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4. Auto-Vox Solar-1

Easy to fit DIY with the true wireless solution: solar power

Specifications

Video quality: 480x272px monitor
Viewing angle: 140 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 5”
Activated: Button
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Very easy to fit
+
Real talking point

Reasons to avoid

-
Tends to discharge if kept indoors
-
Low resolution

Fitting a reversing camera can be a daunting task if you’re not a motor enthusiast, but there is an unsurmountable need for power (the screen and the camera) and a connection between the two. The Auto-Vox Solar 1 takes advantage of wireless to transmit the video from the camera, and a solar panel to power it.

In pure specification terms, the 5-inch display is a bit disappointing (a 7-inch version is available), It draws its power from your vehicle’s 12V (cigarette lighter) socket, has three buttons on the side to tweak settings, and a small antenna attachment and a remote, battery-powered switch you can stick somewhere within reach of your driving position.

The actual fitting involved removing your rear license plate (which must be under 17cm/6.97-inches tall). After that, tuck the solar panel & camera bracket behind and screw it back together. The solar block houses a 2,800mAh battery which the panel will help top up, but there is also a Micro USB socket which you’ll definitely need if you keep your vehicle in the dark a lot (it certainly needs a full charge before first use, too). Oh, and don’t forget to clean the solar panel!

(Image credit: Dallux)
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4. Dallux WCS5000 Backup Camera

Best for wireless reversing camera

Specifications

Video quality: 1024 x 600
Viewing angle: 150 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 5”
Activated: Button
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Wireless
+
Higher resolution than some
+
Additional cameras can be added

Reasons to avoid

-
Could be more attractive

If you’re looking for decent resolution, a wide angle of view and the monitor to see that picture back on, then Dallux are offering a single camera which could help you out whether you’re looking to fit it on a car, camper, truck or SUV. The camera sends a 1080P signal, but the 5-inch monitor (which, yes, could also be more elegant) displays at its maximum resolution (1024 x 600) – Dallux do sell different screen configurations.

The camera can draw power from the 12-30V which powers your taillights. Because it returns a signal as digital wireless it is easier to fit than some while still being secure. How often secure video is needed for reversing cameras is open to debate, but practical security comes from easily popping the monitor out of sight when parked thanks to the suction cup.

The IP69K camera is partnered with two LEDs to help illuminate the view behind and can operate in temperatures from -68˚F to 176˚F (-55˚C to 115˚C, not that we were able to test this). Any image can mirrored and have guide lines added or removed via menu (avoiding a permanent choice by cutting a wire on installation).

(Image credit: Furrion)
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6. Furrion Vision S Vehicle Observation System

The ultimate RV & caravan camera system

Specifications

Video quality: 720x480 cameras
Viewing angle: 20 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 7”
Activated: Optional
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Works with vehicles up to 100ft (30m) long
+
Up to 4 channels on screen 
+
Record option
+
Microphones on rear and doorway cameras

Reasons to avoid

-
Cheaper options available

If you’re hauling a big camper, you need to think about driver visibility, indicating the presence of the load, and – when you reach your destination – the safety of you and your possessions. The Vision S system is built to contribute in every aspect with a selection of cameras; not just the rear Sharkfin with 120-degrees visibility but side cameras with 65-degrees visibility and amber marker lights. These can be installed in place of existing lights, cutting down on installation effort – ideally at the front on either side to give a view of the blind spot. Finally a doorway camera is included which affords a better view of visitors – welcome or otherwise.

When you’re parked up, the 7” touch screen can be rested in the camper on the supplied stand and – except the side-view cameras – there are microphones in these cameras so they can even help you listen as you monitor events outside, though we’d have liked to see a record function.

(Image credit: Amtifo)
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7. Amtifo FHD backup system

Low-cost RV & camper backup camera system

Specifications

Video quality: 1080p cameras
Viewing angle: 150 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 7”
Activated: Optional
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Works with vehicles around 20m/60ft
+
Up to 4 channels
+
Looped Record option

Reasons to avoid

-
More cameras means more power wires

With a theoretical maximum (without obstruction), the 1080P video signals from these cameras can travel nearly 1000ft (300m), meaning they still have a decent amount of range when the radio waves need to negotiate the structures of a truck or RV.

Each of the cameras is designed to withstand the outdoors, with an IP69 rating. The mounting brackets afford a good range of movement, though at 3.3-inches/8.5cm wide they’re not designed for smaller vehicles. Not that the extra size doesn’t have a purpose; it houses 16 LEDs to provide automatically enabled infra-red night vision when needed – don’t forget you’ll need to hook the cameras to power sources – a big camper’s running lights are handy for this.

The 7-inch monitor is sharp, with a selection of buttons to tweak settings like reversing lines and split screens. It’s designed for a big cab, but offers fan shaped or bracket bases. It is also home to the SD card which can record a loop from the up-to four cameras (the included 32GB records 68 hours in this dual camera arrangement).

(Image credit: Garmin)
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8. Garmin BC35

Upgrade your Garmin GPS and keep down in-car clutter

Specifications

Video quality: 1080p cameras
Viewing angle: 160 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 7”
Activated: Optional
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: No
Compatible Garmin Navigators: Garmin dēzl 780/OTR800/OTR1000, dēzlCam 785 RV 701/785/890, Overlander, Garmin fleet 770/780/790

Reasons to buy

+
Avoid adding extra screens
+
Recording with GPS 
+
Makes it possible to retro-fit a whole system

Reasons to avoid

-
Need to buy the Garmin GPS screen component separately
-
Doesn’t work with all Garmin GPS navigators

The chances are, if you’re thinking of adding a backup camera to your vehicle, you’ve come to accept there will be an extra monitor in the cab. If so, it’d be nice to have as many features as possible for as little clutter, which is along the lines Garmin, perhaps better known for its GPS navigation systems, have been thinking. The result is the BC35 camera which can be used with several of its Navigators, including the dezl 780 or the Overlander.

The BC35 has wide 160˚ horizontal viewing through its CMOS sensor, and sends its video signal wirelessly, though you’ll need to draw power from a source in the vehicle when you fit it. 

Garmin also offer a battery wireless camera which can be attached to the top of a license plate, the Garmin BC40, but the BC35 comes with a good length power cable (15ft/4.5m) but a slightly random selection of other cables with the fuse flimsily mounted in the lead.

If you opt for the touchscreen Garmin Overlander – a kind of motorist’s tablet – you get the BC35 with a range of other features including cloud backup as well as local recording, so this is an elegant and useful solution for traveler.

(Image credit: Auto-Vox)
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9: Auto-Vox CS-2

Digital wireless reversing camera for trucks and RVs

Specifications

Video quality: 480x272px monitor
Viewing angle: 110 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 4.3”
Activated: Automatically
Connectivity: Wireless
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Cables provided for reversing or continuous use
+
Clean digital signal
+
Easy DIY install

Reasons to avoid

-
More expensive than some
-
Only 6 presets for parking lines 
-
110˚ view isn’t as wide as some

Auto-Vox’s digital signal means this one-channel system might not be the cheapest, but it produces a more reliable image than those subject to analog interference. Digital images aren’t subject to excessive saturation either, while parking likes can be overlaid too, albeit a limited set of positions.

The camera is connected to (and draws power from) the reversing light, while the monitor is plugged into the lighter socket and offers a spare USB port to charge phones. This makes it an easy DIY install.

The rear-view camera can operate in low-light environments, and with IP68 grade weather protection shouldn’t struggle with the great outdoors. It does, however, have a narrower field of view than some, but this is a matter of taste; this also means it side-steps any fish-eye distortion.

The pack also includes a constant power cable and fixings so the monitor can be used for towing too.

(Image credit: eRapta)
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10. eRapta ERT11

Best budget back-up camera

Specifications

Video quality: 720P
Viewing angle: 150 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: Uses in-car entertainment system
Activated: Automatically
Connectivity: Wired
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Cheap to buy
+
Starlight night vision
+
Connects to reverse and ‘borrows’ in-car entertainment system

Reasons to avoid

-
Requires suitable in car entertainment system
-

If you’ve already fitted a car monitor, then you’ll likely find it has an RCA port for an analog video feed from a camera. If that’s what you’ve got (or you’re having one fitted) then the ERT11 – eRapta’s third generation – makes a great choice backup camera. 

To install, the camera is connected to the reversing light for power and the video and a control lead which tells the system when reverse is engaged to it takes over the display. The camera is IP69 waterproof, and can survive a carwash. It’ll also cope with harsh temperatures: -58˚ to 176˚F (-50˚ to 80˚C). The camera has a glass lens and a typical 30fps refresh, so it can produce a decent image without digital judder. Moreover, unlike predecessors, it can produce a clear image with very little light. The lengthy RCA cable is enough for a sizable truck or car, and two different mounts are included.

If your car is not equipped with a suitable screen – or you don’t feel qualified to lift the entertainment system from the dash – eRapta offer a version of the camera with a monitor.

(Image credit: Jansite)
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11. Jansite One-Wire Installation Backup Camera

Best UK budget backup camera option

Specifications

Video quality: 640x480 monitor
Viewing angle: 120 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: 4.3”
Activated: Switch
Connectivity: Wired
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Cheap to buy in Europe
+
Sucker or bracket to fit monitor
+
Very similar AUTO-VOX M1 available in USA

Reasons to avoid

-
Low Resolution
-
Settings changed by snipping wires

This is a simple and cheap solution which can obtain its power via the cigarette lighter and then needs only one cable to be run to the camera, which clips over the license place. Despite the modest price, the screen can be used in normal and mirrored modes with optional reversing guides and the camera even has ‘Super Night Vision’.

The backup camera itself is pleasingly discrete, not only IP68 waterproof but can be fitted without drilling but just attaching to the top of your number plate. (You could attach it over the front plate too if that’s where you needed help). The resolution might not be true HD, but it’s more than up to the task.

Manual switching may offend the sensibilities of car tech enthusiasts, and changing settings is far from simple, but many car and van drivers like having the ability to keep the view on in other driving situations, so for some that might be a plus.

(Image credit: Wrangler)
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12. EchoMaster Kit for Wrangler JK

Best option for the popular Jeep Wrangler JK

Specifications

Video quality: 640x480
Viewing angle: 170 degrees
Integrated GPS: No
Screen: JK factory fitted
Activated: Switch
Connectivity: Wired
Night vision: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent view through rear-mounted spare
+
Very wide angle view
+
Uses standard 2007-2018 model display

Reasons to avoid

-
No night vision feature
-
Wiring requires vehicle maintenance ability

While it’s no longer the current model, there are hundreds of thousands of Jeep Wranglers on the road and adding a camera with a clear view is easily possible thanks to the central position of the spare wheel on the back door. At that height, the 170 degrees gives a great view, with the lines turned on or off.

EchoMaster’s kit, buit round a 1/4 “CMOS IP-67 camera needs to be wired properly, though on the plus side the included module uses the Jeep’s own screen as a display so there is nothing to clip onto the dash, and the work can be done following the included instructions though experience of car wiring is definitely an advantage. Your mechanic, rather than a dealer with a code, will be all you need though.

Before buying, make sure that your Jeep has the same factory-fitted ‘MyGig’ radio on the Amazon page (opens in new tab)

Choosing a backup camera

Reversing cameras divide long three main lines. These are:

  • Is there a monitor?
    If your car has a screen – or at least an aftermarket head unit – your backup camera can be displayed on that. If you have an original (OEM) monitor, or none at all, you’ll likely need a separate monitor. Separate monitors might take the form of stand-alone items you can attach to your windshield or dash. Some of our favorites are integrated into a rear-view mirror.
  • Wired or Wireless?
    Wireless systems can be quicker to install, though they probably still involve wires. The term usually means there isn’t a wire to the display, but you’ll still have to connect the camera to the reversing light.
  • Mounting point?
    This is very often above the license plate, with a camera designed to fit into the plate mount. The alternatives are a universal mount which can be placed anywhere (perhaps even inside the rear window) or perhaps a brand-specific design.

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