Skip to main content

Best camera for sports photography in 2022: get in on the action!

Best camera for sports photography
(Image credit: Digital Camera World)

The best camera for sports photography has quite specific requirements. It's not all about the most megapixels – a good sports camera needs to be fast and accurate, able to keep up with subjects that move quickly and unpredictably. For this guide, we've compiled the best sports cameras for all budgets and abilities, from cheap bridge cameras that deliver the goods, to the cutting-edge professional models that are used at the Olympics. 

The specs a sports camera needs to excel in are few, but vital. If you're coming at this completely new, then click to jump straight to our section on how to choose the best camera for sports photography, where we lay out the essentials. In brief though, a fast burst rate is vital – meaning a good sports camera needs to be able to capture a lot of shots in a shorts space of time, measured in frames per second. But the other half of this picture is what's called the buffer, meaning the number of consecutive shots a camera can take before it needs to stop to cool off. A camera that can shoot at 12fps isn't much cop if it needs to stop every 13 frames. 

A decent zoom is also handy, as in sports you're unlikely to be able to get super-close to the action. That's why in our list, we've picked a mix of interchangeable-lens cameras that offer access to big lenses, and bridge-style compact cameras that have a big zoom lens of their own. These latter types tend to be much more affordable, and are great for beginners who are learning the ropes of sports photography. 

At the other end of the scale, the world of pro sports cameras tends to be where some of the most exciting developments are happening, especially in the mirrorless camera sector. The upcoming Nikon Z9 is almost here (opens in new tab) , with 120fps burst speeds and a fastest shutter speed of just 1/32,000sec. Then there's also the Canon EOS R3, a full-frame monster (opens in new tab) that allows you to control the AF point with movement of your eye! Once these cameras hit store shelves, and are put through their paces by our reviewers, we're sure they'll end up earning a place on this list. 

To help you find the best camera for sports photography for your needs, we've split this guide into three different categories. First we deal with beginner cameras, then with the best mid-priced models for enthusiasts, and lastly we list the top sports cameras for professionals. 

Best camera for sports photography – the full list

Bridge cameras for beginners

If you’re looking for something straightforward, self-contained and affordable that’ll allow you to get some good shots of the kids’ sports days, look no further. These bridge cameras have large zoom lenses that let you get close to the action, are designed to be intuitive to use, and all carry smaller price tags than mirrorless cameras or DSLRs.

(Image credit: Nikon)
(opens in new tab)
With an impressive 2000mm you'll be able to zoom in on all the action

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3-inch
Megapixels: 16MP
Lens: 24-2000mm (equivalent) f/2.8
AF points: Not specified
Burst rate: 7fps
Buffer: 10 shots (JPEG)
Weight: 1005g

Reasons to buy

+
Enormous zoom range
+
Useful stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Small, unimpressive sensor
-
Sharpness issues at telephoto

It’s just… an enormous zoom lens, isn’t it? If you’ve ever wanted to stand at the side of a rugby pitch and zoom in so far that you can see a player’s individual follicles (and really, who hasn’t?) then the Nikon CoolPix P950, with its 83x optical zoom, is the camera for you. A little more affordable than the flagship P1000, this impressive camera can bring even the most distant subjects within easy reach. There are a few sharpness issues at the telephoto end, particularly if you’re working at high ISO settings, but in all honesty it’s much more usable than it has any right to be. 

Read more: Nikon Coolpix P950 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Panasonic)
(opens in new tab)

2. Panasonic FZ300

Need a big zoom but have a tight budget? The FZ300 is budget-friendly and has an impressive lens

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1/2.3-inch MOS
Megapixels: 12.1MP
Lens: 25-600mm (equivalent) f/2.8
AF points: 49
Burst rate: 12fps with AF (or up to 30fps using 4K Photo mode)
Buffer: Not specified
Weight: 640g

Reasons to buy

+
Impressive zoom lens
+
Well-priced package

Reasons to avoid

-
Small sensor...
-
... with low megapixel count

Bridge cameras may not offer all of the high-end functionality of professional mirrorless cameras and DSLRs, but for the money you spend, you do get a heck of a lot. Nowhere is this more true than in the case of the Panasonic Lumix FZ300 (known as the FZ330 outside of North America). It's an inexpensive bridge camera with an impressively big 24x optical zoom that’s perfect for sports photography. It’s no slouch in burst shooting either, with a 4K Photo mode that allows you to utilize the 30fps 4K frame rate for the purposes of stills shooting – as long as you don’t mind a resolution cut to 8MP. Although resolution more generally is the camera’s main area of disadvantage – its resolution tops out at 12.1MP, meaning it’s not a great choice if you’re planning to make prints, and the relatively small sensor does affect performance in low light. If neither of these are important factors for you, this is a strong choice for simple sports photography.

(Image credit: Panasonic)

3. Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 II

A bigger 1-inch sensor means its low-light performance is better than on other bridge cameras

Specifications

Type: Compact
Sensor: 1-inch MOS
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens: 25-400mm (equivalent) f/2.8-4
AF points: 49
Burst rate: 30fps (using 4K Photo mode, 8MP), 12fps (single AF), 7fps (continuous AF)
Buffer: 100+ shots (JPEG), 26 shots (RAW)
Weight: 810g

Reasons to buy

+
Good shot buffer
+
Useful Zoom Assist mode

Reasons to avoid

-
Max aperture falls quickly
-
Comparatively expensive

For a bridge camera with a little more oomph, we'd definitely recommend considering Panasonic's FZ1000 II. Its 1-inch sensor gives you significantly greater dynamic range to work with, making it easier to shoot in challenging light conditions and generally improving versatility. While the FZ1000 II is a pretty minor refresh over the original FZ1000, for sports photographers it does deliver a few improvements where it counts. The buffer depth is greater, for one, and there's also the new Zoom Compose Assist mode. This mode tracks your subject while you're zoomed in and keeps hold of them even if they suddenly leave the frame – useful if a football player unexpectedly changes direction. The 4K Photo mode is also handy, allowing you to shoot 8MP images at 30fps. 

Sports cameras for enthusiasts

For enthusiasts who know what they’re doing and want a camera that’ll give them options to suit their level of expertise, these are the best DSLRs and mirrorless cameras for sports photography. These models all have the impressive burst-shooting rates needed for shooting fast action, and give the user access to the kinds of excellent lenses that’ll deliver great results every time.

(Image credit: Rod Lawton)
(opens in new tab)
With a 30fps burst mode and a big buffer, you'll be able to snap away and never miss a shot

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 26.1MP
Lens mount: Fujifilm X
AF points: 425
Burst rate: 20fps (mechanical shutter), 30fps (electronic shutter; 1.25x crop)
Buffer: 145 shots (JPEG), 42 shots (lossless compression RAW), 36 shots (uncompressed RAW)
Weight: 607g

Reasons to buy

+
Images look fantastic
+
Big JPEG buffer
+
Sensor-shift stabilisation

Reasons to avoid

-
Pretty expensive for APS-C

More than just an update to the X-T3, more than just another mirrorless APS-C camera – the Fujifilm X-T4 is one of the best cameras ever made. With all-metal construction and dial-led controls, it’s fantastic to handle, and it produces gorgeous, vibrant images straight out of camera. Fast burst shooting, a big buffer (well, big for JPEGS), great high-ISO performance, a terrific stable of X-system lenses – it’s got it all for sports shooters. Any negatives? Well, a lot of attention was paid to the (brilliant) 4K video on the X-T4, and while this is obviously all to the good, it does mean that the asking price is a little high if you’re only planning to shoot stills.

Read more: Fujifilm X-T4 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Digital Camera World / Louise Carey)
(opens in new tab)
A lightweight, super speedy APS-C camera with an increasing range of lenses to choose from

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 20.8MP
Lens mount: Nikon Z
AF points: 209
Burst rate: 11fps
Buffer: Not specified
Weight: 395g

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent dynamic range
+
Lightweight and fast

Reasons to avoid

-
No in-body stabilization
-
Relatively few native lenses

The new baby in Nikon’s Z range of mirrorless cameras, the Nikon Z 50 (opens in new tab) is an APS-C model aimed squarely at enthusiasts and newbies looking to take their first step into mirrorless shooting. It’s a great choice for sports photography thanks not only to its 11fps burst shooting but also its sophisticated autofocus system and impressive image quality, with dynamic range you’ll be talking about for days. It’s a good system to invest in with one eye on the future – though that does mean the native lens selection is currently a little limited. The most telephoto reach you’ll currently get with a Z-branded lens is 250mm. While an FTZ adapter does help here, using F-mount lenses is a good stopgap solution but not ideal in the long run. Still, with every sign that Nikon plans to make this system a future priority, the Z 50 represents a solid investment.

Read more: Nikon Z 50 review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
(opens in new tab)
A fast burst rate and a 32-megapixel sensor make it great for sports photography

Specifications

Type: DSLR
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 32.5MP
Lens mount: Canon EF
AF points: 45
Burst rate: 11fps
Buffer: 58 shots (JPEG), 25 shots (RAW)
Weight: 701g

Reasons to buy

+
Great Live View autofocus
+
216-zone metering system

Reasons to avoid

-
Unimpressive buffer
-
Small jump from 80D

Some have questioned the need for the humble DSLR in the age of the mirrorless camera, but Canon came out fighting with the versatile, well-engineered EOS 90D. It’s a do-it-all DSLR designed to function well in myriad different shooting situations, fast enough for sports photographers while also boasting rugged weatherproofing for outdoor use. Its sophisticated metering system helps nail the exposures in JPEG mode – useful, as the RAW buffer is a little limited compared to the competition. Surprisingly for a DSLR, the EOS 90D really comes into its own in Live View mode using the LCD, with great touchscreen controls and a solid Live View autofocus system.

Read more: Canon EOS 90D review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Future)
(opens in new tab)
Stunning autofocus and good burst performance in a compact body

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: APS-C
Megapixels: 24MP
Lens mount: Sony E
AF points: 425
Burst rate: 11fps
Buffer: 116 shots (JPEG), 46 shots (RAW)
Weight: 503g

Reasons to buy

+
Good battery life
+
Real-time Eye AF tracking

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller buffer than A6500
-
Dated/cramped body design

Sony has done a great job of carving out a niche for its APS-C cameras alongside the full-frame flagships – the A6000 series are known for being fast and light, with burst and autofocus speeds to rival those of the pros. This generally makes them great for sports photography, and the A6600, the newest of the bunch, is no exception, with 11fps burst shooting and a sophisticated 425-point autofocus system that boasts features like real-time Eye AF tracking – a great tool for keeping track of a fast-moving player. It’s a little disappointing that the shot buffer has been reduced from the previous (and cheaper) A6500, but this is still an exceptional imaging machine.

Read more: Sony A6600 review (opens in new tab)

Professional sports cameras

These are best professional sports cameras right now, for those who shot action subjects for a living and need the ultimate in speed, durability and reliability. 

(Image credit: James Artaius / Digital Camera World)
Super-fast WiFi transfer makes this a smart choice for press photographers who need fast image turnaround

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full-frame
Megapixels: 24.2MP
Lens mount: Sony FE
AF points: 693
Burst rate: 20fps (electronic shutter), 10fps (mechanical shutter)
Buffer: 361 shots (JPEG), 239 shots (compressed RAW), 226 shots (compressed raw + JPEG)
Weight: 678g

Reasons to buy

+
Superior autofocus system
+
Burst shooting demon
+
Superfast Wi-Fi

Reasons to avoid

-
No CFexpress support

Where to begin? It’s the most advanced mirrorless camera around right now, it’s a superb sports-shooting machine thanks to its 20fps burst shooting with no viewfinder blackout, and its autofocus system puts basically all others to shame, capable as it is of making up to 60 calculations every second. Yep, that about covers the superb Sony A9 II (opens in new tab), but the manufacturer really has gone above and beyond with other features useful for sports shooters, like the built-in 5GHz Wi-Fi for super-fast image transfer, like a new mechanical shutter designed with ultra-low vibration, like… well. You get the idea. An outstanding achievement in camera engineering.

Read more: Sony A9 Mark II review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Digital Camera World)
(opens in new tab)
It's big and heavy but the buffer, burst rate and advanced AF system make it excellent for sports

Specifications

Type: DSLR
Sensor: Full-frame
Megapixels: 20.1MP
Lens mount: Canon EF
AF points: 191
Burst rate: 16fps
Buffer: 1,000+ shots (essentially unlimited)
Weight: 1,250g

Reasons to buy

+
Near-infinite buffer
+
Revolutionary smart controller
+
Deep-learning AF

Reasons to avoid

-
No stabilisation

Like including Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours on a best-seventies-album list, we’re not surprising anyone by putting the EOS-1D X Mark III (opens in new tab) in here, but all the same, the enterprise would feel wrong without it. It’s the third iteration of the best action DSLR in the world, but it takes on advancements from the world of mirrorless to make for one of the best cameras ever made. The 1D X Mark III just shoots and shoots and shoots, and with an amazing smart controller that makes handling a breeze, and deep-learning autofocus that gets better with use, it’s one of the best sports-shooting cameras ever made. 

Pro Canon shooters wanting the firm's best sports camera should also consider the EOS R3 (opens in new tab), the latest full-frame mirrorless model for professionals. While it's not supposed to be a replacement for the 1D X Mark III, as it's not a "1-series" camera (that'll be the EOS R1 (opens in new tab), whenever it gets here), it does considerably outstrip the 1DX Mark III in several key areas. Once we've fully tested it, and it's available to buy, it may well find a place in this guide while we're all twiddling our thumbs waiting for the EOS R1. 

Read more: Canon EOS-1D X Mark III review (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Rod Lawton/Digital Camera World)
The fastest sports camera on the planet - but it comes with a hefty price tag

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full Frame
Megapixels: 50.1MP
Lens: Sony E mount
LCD: 3in tilting touchscreen, 1.44million dots
Viewfinder: EVF, 9.44million dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 50fps electronic shutter, 10fps mechanical
Max video resolution: 8K
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
Unprecedented 30fps burst shooting
+
8K video that doesn't overheat
+
Hybrid CFexpress A and SD card slots

Reasons to avoid

-
Stabilization is still suspect
-
30fps isn't guaranteed
-
No articulating screen

This could be the ultimate mirrorless camera. There is literally nothing it can't shoot. Sports? Check, thanks to its unreal 30fps continuous shooting. Fine detail? Check, thanks to its 50.1MP resolution. Video? Check, thanks to its 8K recording capability (even though it's hampered by not having a fully articulating screen). The Sony A1 is far and away the most advanced and most powerful camera on the market… yet this comes at a cost, literally. It's about twice the cost of the Sony A9 II, and it's even more expensive than the 100MP medium format Fujifilm GFX 100S. There are also caveats on the 30fps burst, which isn't always achievable (sometimes topping out at 15-20fps, which is still impressive but less impressive than the spec sheet). Overall, though, if you want a camera that can take on any possible assignment, this is it.

(Image credit: James Artaius)
This beast makes a great sports camera due to its fast burst mode - but it's great for portraits and video too

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor: Full frame CMOS
Megapixels: 47.5MP
Monitor: 3.2-inch, 2,100k dot 4-axis tilting touchscreen
Continuous shooting speed: 20fps RAW (up to 1,000 buffer), 30fps hi-res JPEG, 120fps lo-res JPEG
Viewfinder: EVF, 3,690k dots, 100% coverage
Max video resolution: 4K UHD at 30p
User level: Enthusiast

Reasons to buy

+
120fps burst and deep buffer
+
8K 60p video
+
Deep-learning autofocus

Reasons to avoid

-
Only 11MP at 120fps
-
Some features arriving later

Here, at long last, is the shot across the bows of Canon and Sony – the Nikon Z9, the firm's latest pro mirrorless camera and a startling step forward for professional imaging. Taking full advantage of the Nikon Z-mount, with its short flange distance and large throat diameter, the Nikon Z9 boasts an intimidating set of features. It's capable of burst-shooting at a face-melting 120fps, for one, and its buffer can record a nominal 1,000 images per burst, with Nikon recording it being capable of as many as 5,000 when used with a high-spec CFExpress card. 

It also uses deep-learning AF, meaning its focusing ability should get better over time, and the back-side illuminated sensor delivers superior low-light performance. However, while this camera is still on pre-order with arrival imminent, there is one drawback we do have to mention. Several of its headline features, like 8K 60p video and the compressed high-efficiency N-RAW format, are not going to be available at launch, but will come in a firmware update expected later in 2022. Nikon is not the only manufacturer doing this, but it's still a trend we're not fans of.

Read more: Nikon Z9 review (opens in new tab)

It might only have a 24MP sensor but with a 30fps burst mode it could be an advantage

Specifications

Type: Mirrorless
Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS
Megapixels: 24.1
Monitor: 3.2-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 4.15 million dots
Continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Viewfinder: Electronic 0.5-inch, 5.76m dots
Max video resolution : 6K
User level: Professional

Reasons to buy

+
6K Raw video
+
30fps continuous shooting
+
Blackout-free shooting

Reasons to avoid

-
No 8K video
-
Only a 24.1MP sensor
-
Split SD/CF Express card slots

The Canon EOS R3 (opens in new tab) is the latest addition to Canon's mirrorless lineup, offering 6K Raw video, 30fps continuous shooting and Eye control AF so you can place a focal point simply by looking at your subject. It packs a lot of advanced features which make up for the fact it's "only" 24.1MP. It might not be the highest resolution sensor, but at least when you're shooting hundreds of images in burst mode, the file sizes will be smaller and it'll take less time to transfer than if you were shooting with something like the Sony A1 (opens in new tab). The 6K and 4K video footage is crystal clear and best of all it doesn't seem to suffer from the same overheating issues as the R5 and R6. We were seriously impressed with the R3 when we got to do hands-on with it. It's a super-fast, intuitive camera that's more than capable of producing high-quality pictures and videos.

How to choose the best camera for sports photography

One of the most important features in a sports camera is a good burst mode. This refers to how many frames per second your camera can capture. The faster it is, the more likely you are to capture that winning mid-action shot. Mirrorless cameras tend to be more impressive in this area, as they don't have a physical shutter to move. However, there are many DSLRs that have perfectly respectable burst modes as well. 

However, a great burst mode means very little without a good buffer depth to accompany it. This refers to the amount of continuous photos a camera can take before it needs to pause. If you're shooting in JPEG, then you'll find that there will be a larger buffer than if you're shooting in RAW. However, professional cameras should be capable of decent buffer depths for RAW files. 

Another super important feature for the best camera for sports photography is fast and efficient autofocus. Without an autofocus system that's able to keep up with the action, you'll likely end up with a lot of mis-focused images that will make you want to tear your hair out! You'll want to look for a good coverage of autofocus points – and if the camera has a sophisticated AF tracking system, then you're definitely on the right lines.

Whether it's photographing a Formula 1 car racing around the track or a sprinter reaching the finish line, almost all sports photography requires an absolutely essential ingredient: a telephoto lens. If you have a bit more cash to splash, then you'll want to plump for an interchangeable-lens camera that has great telephoto options. Alternatively, if you're on a budget, then you'd do well to consider a compact camera with a generous zoom – such as the bridge cameras we've listed at the top of this article. 

How we test cameras

We test DSLR and mirrorless cameras in real-world shooting scenarios and in carefully controlled lab conditions. Our lab tests measure resolution, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio. Resolution is measured using ISO resolution charts, dynamic range is measured using DxO Analyzer test equipment and DxO Analyzer is also used for noise analysis across the camera's ISO range. For compact cameras, we use real-world results and handling alone in compiling our guides.

Read more:

The best professional cameras (opens in new tab) right now
Best camera for car photography (opens in new tab)
The best mirrorless cameras today (opens in new tab)
The best DSLRs to buy (opens in new tab)
DSLR vs mirrorless (opens in new tab): which is best?
The best telephoto lenses (opens in new tab)

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Jon spent years at IPC Media writing features, news, reviews and other photography content for publications such as Amateur Photographer and What Digital Camera in both print and digital form. With his additional experience for outlets like Photomonitor, this makes Jon one of our go-to specialists when it comes to all aspects of photography, from cameras and action cameras to lenses and memory cards, flash diffusers and triggers, batteries and memory cards, selfie sticks and gimbals, and much more besides.  


An NCTJ-qualified journalist, he has also contributed to Shortlist, The Skinny, ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, The Guardian, Trusted Reviews, CreativeBLOQ, and probably quite a few others I’ve forgotten.