Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends photo book depicts early years of Pop Art

Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends
Cover of Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends. (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)

More than 150 pictures of Andy Warhol and his acquaintances captured during the mid-1960s by American photojournalist, Steve Schapiro, are finally seeing the light of day in a new photo book published by TASCHEN and authored by Blake Gopnik. 

Schapiro was a legendary photographer known for his photojournalism works that depicted key moments of the civil rights movement. He sadly passed away earlier this year in January, at the age of 87.

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A behind-the-scenes look at the rise of the world-famous Pop artist legend, producer, and filmmaker, Andy Warhol is being portrayed in a new limited-number hardcover photo book that comprises six decades worth of imagery from the documentary photographer, Steve Schapiro, on the life of Andy Warhol. 

The photo book published by TASCHEN is titled Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends (opens in new tab), and has been authored by the New York Times contributor and successfully published by definitive Warhol biographer, Blake Gopnik.

Cover of Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends. (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)
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American culture shines throughout this photo book, documenting everything from this unique era such as the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. as well as the presidential campaign of Robert F. Kennedy. Readers will get a front-row seat to the behind-the-scenes of Andy Warhol’s Factory, and a glimpse into the filming of The Godfather trilogy.

The performers' Sonny and Cher with Warhol at the Trip in Los Angeles on May 3, 1966. The hard-edged Velvets and their “manager” Warhol were a bad fit for the California scene as it embraced peace, love, and flower power. “It will replace nothing — except maybe suicide,” Cher is supposed to have said as she walked out on the band. (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)
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From Campbell Soup Cans to the diptych of Marilyn Monroe, Warhol's artworks are instantly recognizable, as is his trademark pop art style. Schapiro’s images have been juxtaposed with Warhol pieces that were created and exhibited during the time period between 1965-1966, with multiple contact sheets and quotes from the artist.

Warhol in his signature motorcycle jacket and dark sunglasses at the Castle in Los Angeles, 1966 (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)
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Warhol produced his art during a very transformative period in the post-war timeline of New York and American culture, and luckily Schapiro was there to document Warhol's creative process and relentless rise from starting out as a New York-based culture Pop artist, to becoming a legendary 20th-century icon.

Lou Reed and Nico, Scepter Studio, located on West 54th Street in Manhattan, 1965. A decade later the building was home to the legendary Studio 54 disco, often frequented by Warhol during its heyday. (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)
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The photography book is a collector’s edition (opens in new tab)that's limited to only 700 copies (No. 101–700), which are each numbered and signed by Steve Schapiro. Priced at $1,000 (£850 / AU$1,500 approximately) - this book certainly isn't cheap, and is pretty heavy too, comprising 236 pages in a hard case with an acrylic slipcover.  

Steve Schapiro, Andy Warhol and Friends

Andy with Silver Cloud, Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, 1966. (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)

Be sure to grab yourself a copy of this limited edition photo book and collector's item from TASCHEN, and embark on a visual journey through collaboration between Schapiro's images and Warhol's creative flair and mannerisms. 

New York party, 1965. “In the years that I photographed Andy, I never saw him out of his ‘character’ — except in this one photo. He looks so charmed by his friend Edie. I find this picture to be very endearing. I call this image ‘Andy Loves Edie.’” — Steve Schapiro (Image credit: Steve Schapiro / TASCHEN)
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You may also want to take a look at our guides to the best canvas print services (opens in new tab), as well as the best retro cameras (opens in new tab), and not forgetting the best instant cameras (opens in new tab). Discover how to use neon lights to add drama to your photography projects (opens in new tab), and hang them in style with WhiteWall's Pop Art frames (opens in new tab).

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Beth Nicholls
Staff Writer

A staff writer for Digital Camera World, Beth has an extensive background in various elements of technology with five years of experience working as a tester and sales assistant for CeX. After completing a degree in Music Journalism, followed by obtaining a Master's degree in Photography awarded by the University of Brighton, she spends her time outside of DCW as a freelance photographer specialising in live music events and band press shots under the alias 'bethshootsbands'.