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Red + Canon RF = Red V-Raptor ST, an 8K camera that shoots up to 600fps

Red joins the 8K battle! The Red V-Raptor ST delivers 8K 120fps – for $24,500
(Image credit: YouTube: Red Digital Cinema)

Red has announced its latest flagship cinema camera, the Red V-Raptor ST, and in doing so has joined the 8K battleground. 

The new Red V-Raptor ST features a newly designed 35.4 megapixel sensor, which is capable of producing 8K video at up to 120 frames per second or 2K video up to an astonishing 600 frames per second.

• Read more: Best cinema cameras

Notably, the V-Raptor makes use of the Canon RF mount – the same mirrorless mount used on R-series cameras such as the Canon EOS R5, as well as the manufacturer's new generation of cinema cameras like the Canon EOS C70

It is significant that Red has chosen the RF mount, which is becoming increasingly legitimized as the cinema mount of the future – and of course is compatible with EF optics, one of the current staples of cine shooting, by way of lens adaptors. 

In addition to its headline 8K capability, the V-Raptor boasts Red's best ever dynamic range of "over 17 stops", along with double the scan time speed of the brand's previous cameras. The Redcode RAW codec enables footage to be captured in 16-bit RAW – even at the full fat 8K 120p. Accordingly, it relies on CFexpress memory to push all that data.  

The Red V-Raptor ST is available body only for $24,500 (approximately £17,766 / AU$33,183), or in a Starter Pack (including a 7-inch monitor, 660GB CFexpress card and reader, two batteries with charger, grip and Timecode cable) for $29,579.99 (£21,449.33 / AU$40,059.91). The product description from Red follows.

Watch video: Red V-Raptor ST product reveal

"V-Raptor ST 8K VV is the most powerful and advanced Red cinema camera ever. As the brand’s new flagship system and sensor, as well as the first entrant into the new DSMC3 generation of cameras, V-Raptor stands alone at the forefront of the of digital image capture technology.

"Featuring a groundbreaking multi-format 8K sensor- with the ability to shoot 8K Large Format or 6K S35, it unlocks the largest lens selection of any comparable camera on the market and allows shooters the ability to always deliver at over 4K. The sensor also boasts the highest recorded dynamic range of any Red camera and the fastest ever cinema quality scan time. 

"With a dynamic range of over 17 stops and featuring scan times 2x faster than any previous Red camera, allowing users to capture up to 600 fps at 2K. V-Raptor will also continue to feature Red’s proprietary Redcode RAW codec, allowing users to capture 16-bit RAW, and leverage Red’s latest IPP2 workflow and color management.

Along with a new flagship sensor, the V-Raptor features a modernized platform in an amazingly compact package weighing in at barely over 4 lbs. With 2 4K 12G-SDI outputs, XLR audio and phantom power via adapter, and 1080p livestream, this system can handle most anything a shooter can throw at it."

Read more: 

What is 8K?
Canon EOS R5 review
Canon EOS C70 review

James Artaius

The editor of Digital Camera World, James has 21 years experience as a magazine and web journalist and started working in the photographic industry in 2014 (as an assistant to Damian McGillicuddy, who succeeded David Bailey as Principal Photographer for Olympus). In this time he shot for clients as diverse as Aston Martin Racing, Elinchrom and L'Oréal, in addition to shooting campaigns and product testing for Olympus, and providing training for professionals. This has led him to being a go-to expert for camera and lens reviews, photographic and lighting tutorials, as well as industry analysis, news and rumors for publications such as Digital Camera MagazinePhotoPlus: The Canon MagazineN-PhotoDigital Photographer and Professional Imagemaker, as well as hosting workshops and demonstrations at The Photography Show. An Olympus (Micro Four Thirds) and Canon (full frame) shooter, he has a wealth of knowledge on cameras of all makes – and a particular fondness for vintage lenses and film cameras.