Canon PowerShot PX review

The Canon PowerShot PX is a ‘smart’ camera that automatically captures images for us, allowing us to get on with living our life

Canon PowerShot PX review
(Image: © Gavin Stoker / Digital Camera World)

Digital Camera World Verdict

The Canon PowerShot PX – or ‘Pixie’ – is an auto-everything ‘smart’ camera designed to take pictures for us. Or as its maker sells it: this is your own personal photographer. However, if it truly was our own personal photographer, we probably wouldn’t hire it again. This is because results closely resemble image grabs from a webcam, worsening progressively as light levels drop. While pairing it with, and controlling it from, our smartphone’s handset proved relatively easy, its suggested price tag feels somewhat higher than it should be for something best viewed as a bit of fun – but you can find significant discounts in some places.

Pros

  • +

    Unobtrusive

  • +

    Quick and easy to pair with our smartphone

  • +

    Decent build quality given its size

Cons

  • -

    So-so results resemble webcam grabs or surveillance camera footage

  • -

    Unable to pan through a full 360°

  • -

    Expensive (particularly if you pay full price)

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Originally released in time for Christmas 2021, the Canon PowerShot PX was, at that time, the company’s first ‘smart’ camera intended to revolutionize the way people – specifically families – take photographs. Sold as the Powershot Pick in North America and Australasia, the PX is an AI-powered surveillance device of sorts, the intention here was that the camera automatically takes photographs and videos without anyone needing to press a shutter release button. 

With a pepperpot-style webcam look, the PowerShot PX was designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when stuck on a shelf or mantelpiece. The idea is that we’re free to socialize while it takes candid, un-posed snaps. Opinion was split in our household from the off, with some finding the look of the device ‘cute’ but others decrying it as ugly. 

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Gavin Stoker

Gavin has over 30 years’ experience of writing about photography and television. He is currently the editor of British Photographic Industry News, and previously served as editor of Which Digital Camera and deputy editor of Total Digital Photography


He has also written for a wide range of publications including T3, BBC Focus, Empire, NME, Radio Times, MacWorld, Computer Active, What Digital Camera and the Rough Guide books.


With his wealth of knowledge, Gavin is well placed to recognize great camera deals and recommend the best products in Digital Camera World’s buying guides. He also writes on a number of specialist subjects including binoculars and monoculars, spotting scopes, microscopes, trail cameras, action cameras, body cameras, filters and cameras straps.