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Phantom TMX camera shoots slomo at 1,750,000 frames per second!

Phantom TMX
(Image credit: Phantom)

High-speed camera specialists Phantom is setting a new benchmark for slow-motion video photography with the release of a new model that can capture footage at an extraordinary 1.75 million frames per second!

You may not have heard of Phantom, but you will have undoubtedly seen video shot with them on science and nature programs. If you want to see an explosion capture in all it frame-by-frame detail, want to see a bullet being fired, or see a high-resolution series of images showing the movements of a bees wings - then professional filmmakers reach for a Phantom. The range is made by American company Vision Research, which is based in Wayne, New Jersey.

The new Phantom TMX Series consists of two models, TMX 7510 and TMX 6410, designed to provide true high-speed performance. TMX 7510 achieves 76,000 frames per second (fps) at full 1MP resolution of 1280 x 800 ir over 300,000 fps at 1280 x 192 resolution – and over 770,000 fps at smaller resolutions. With the export-controlled FAST option, TMX 7510 reaches the blistering 1.75 Million fps and 95 nanosecond (ns) minimum exposure time, eliminating motion blur. This enables precise motion analysis for extremely fast applications. 

The TMX Series features the first high-speed cameras to use back side illuminated (BSI) sensors, achieving a readout of  some 75 gigapixels per second – as well as improving light sensitivity. 

YouTube stars The Slow Mo guys are big fans of Phantom camera - see them here using it to see exactly what an exploding watermelon looks like!

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Chris George

Chris George has worked on Digital Camera World since its launch in 2017. He has been writing about photography, mobile phones, video making and technology for over 30 years – and has edited numerous magazines including PhotoPlus, N-Photo, Digital Camera, Video Camera, and Professional Photography. 


His first serious camera was the iconic Olympus OM10, with which he won the title of Young Photographer of the Year - long before the advent of autofocus and memory cards. Today he uses a Nikon D800, a Fujifilm X-T1, a Sony A7, and his iPhone 11 Pro.