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The best iPads for photo editing, video editing and photography in 2022

best iPads for photo editing, video editing and photography
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

What are the best iPads for photographers and video editors? If money's no object, the simple answer is the iPad Pro 12.9 M1 (2021) (opens in new tab) and the iPad Pro 11 M1 (2021) (opens in new tab), which have the fastest processors, best screens and most storage. However, these latest models are expensive, and will be overkill for many people. In this article, then, we'll round up the best iPads at a range of budgets, and give you the information you need to pick the right choice for you.

In general, iPads are certainly among the best tablets for photographers (opens in new tab). Lightweight and portable, they're also becoming increasingly powerful, which means you can use programs such as Adobe Photoshop for iPad or Affinity Photo without having to suffer from lagging or loading issues. And of course, they benefit from the sleek design that all Apple products are known for and have portability of their side.

Note, though, that we haven't included every single iPad on list this: if you want that, then check out this list of all the different iPad generations (opens in new tab). Instead, we've curated the best of the best, to help narrow down your choices.

• See also: Best Wacom tablets (opens in new tab)

The best iPad in 2022

Apple iPad Pro 12.9 (2021)Editor's Choice

(Image credit: Matthew Bolton/Digital Camera World)
The best iPad for photographers and video editors

Specifications

Weight: 682g
Dimensions: 280.6 x 214.9 x 6.4 mm
OS: iPadOS 14
Screen size: 12.9-inch
Resolution: 2048 x 2732 pixels
CPU: Apple M1 chip
Storage: 128GB/256GB/512GB/1TB/2TB
microSD slot: No
Rear cameras: 12MP wide (f/1.8), 10-MP ultra-wide (f/2.4)
Front camera: 12MP ultra-wide TrueDepth (f/2.4)

Reasons to buy

+
New M1 chip
+
Up to 2TB of storage
+
TrueDepth selfie camera

Reasons to avoid

-
No microSD slot
-
Key accessories cost extra

The current iPad Pro (2021) 12.9 is the best iPad for photo editing – or, indeed, pretty much anything creative that you want to set your mind to. Apple has gone under the hood and given the latest iPad Pro a substantial internal update that could revolutionize what users will expect from their tablets forever. If that sounds like hyperbole to you, then let us explain. 

The iPad Pro is the first tablet to ever house the Apple M1 chipset. This means that the 8-core CPU will be 50% faster than the previous generation, while the 8-core GPU will deliver 40% faster graphics (interestingly, the new iPad Pro will be an astounding 1500x faster than the very first iPad Pro!).

Outside of the introduction of the M1 chip, some of the other exciting features include a 2TB storage option, the addition of 5G (and in the US, users will be able to experience super-fast mmWave 5G) and a new 12MP ultra-wide front-facing camera with a 122º field of view.

This new TrueDepth selfie camera is particularly intriguing, as it features the new Center Stage function. This gives users the ability to record and stream video while moving around their space. Center Stage will track the user's movement and keep the subject in the field-of-view by panning to follow them. It'll even expand to fit others in the shot if new people join the video. 

The iPad Pro (2021) 12.9 is admittedly pretty expensive, so if you're on a budget then you may want to check out some of the other options in our guide to the best iPads for photo editing. Plus, when you start adding on additional storage and cellular connectivity, you might start to find your wallet wincing. However, if you've got the cash to splash, the substantial upgrades to the iPad Pro mean that there's no better investment for your money.

iPad Air 2022

(Image credit: Apple)

2. iPad Air (2022)

The best and lightest iPad for photographers and video editors

Specifications

Weight: Wi-Fi: 461g Wi-Fi + Cellular 462g
Dimensions: 247.6 x 178.5 x 6.1 mm
OS: iPadOS 14
Screen size: 10.9-inch
Resolution: 2360 x 1640 pixels
CPU: Apple M1 chip
Storage: 64GB/256GB
microSD slot: No
Rear cameras: 12MP wide (f/1.8)
Front camera: 12MP ultra-wide f/2.5

Reasons to buy

+
New M1 chip
+
Very light
+
Stereo speakers

Reasons to avoid

-
No microSD slot
-
Only up to 256GB of storage

The lightest iPad now receives the revolutionary Apple M1 chipset. This means that the 8-core CPU will be 60% faster than the previous generation, while the 8-core GPU will deliver 2x faster graphics.

Outside of the introduction of the M1 chip, some of the other exciting features include either a 64GB or 256GB storage option, the addition of 5G (and in the US, users will be able to experience super-fast mmWave 5G) and a new 12MP ultra-wide front-facing camera with a 122º field of view along with the companies Centre Stage, making sure you always in the frame while on important business calls. Center Stage will track the user's movement and keep the subject in the field-of-view by panning to follow them. It'll even expands to fit others in the shot if new people join the video. 

The iPad Air (2022) 10.9 is admittedly pretty expensive when spec'd out, so if you're on a budget then you may want to check out the other options in our guide to the best iPads for photo editing. Plus, when you start adding on additional storage and cellular connectivity, you might start to find your wallet wincing. However, if you've got the cash to splash, the substantial upgrades to the iPad Air mean that there's no better investment.

(Image credit: Apple)
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2. iPad Pro 11 (2021)

The second best iPad for photographers and video editors

Specifications

Weight: 468g
Dimensions: 247.6 x 178.5 x 5.9 mm
OS: iPadOS 13
Screen size: 11-inch
Resolution: 2388 x 1668 pixels
CPU: A12X Bionic
Storage: 64GB/256GB/512GB/1TB
microSD slot: No
Rear camera: 12MP wide (f/1.8), 10-MP ultra-wide (f/2.4)
Front camera: 12MP ultra-wide TrueDepth (f/2.4)

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and light
+
Great value
+
Powerful M1 chip

Reasons to avoid

-
Lower brightness than 12.9 inch Pro

If the 12.9-inch version of the iPad Pro (number one on our list) is either too large or too expensive for you, then consider the more compact and affordable 11-inch version. This matches its bigger sibling in almost all respects: you can get the same powerful M1 chip, the same storage, the same gorgeous display, the same first-class cameras, the same 5G connectivity. 

The main difference other than size and weight is that the screen only offers 600 nits of brightness, to the 12.9 inch iPad Pro's 1,600. However, the big price difference between them means the 11-inch version is very tempting indeed. Particularly if you're thinking of getting a Apple Magic Keyboard to turn your tablet into a laptop, as there's a big price difference between the 11 and 12.9 inch version of that too. 

(Image credit: Apple)
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3. iPad 10.2 (2021)

The best non-Pro iPad for photographers

Specifications

Weight: 487g
Dimensions: 248.9 x 172.7 x 7.4 mm
OS: iPadOS 15
Screen size: 10.2-inch
Resolution: 2160 x 1620 pixels
CPU: A13 Bionic
Storage: 64GB/256GB
microSD slot: No
Battery: 32.4Wh
Rear cameras: 8MP f/2.4
Front camera: 12MP f/2.4

Reasons to buy

+
Double storage for similar money
+
True Tone screen
+
Much-improved front camera

Reasons to avoid

-
Incremental update over 2020 version

The latest 2021 iPad may not be as revolutionary as the new MacBooks launched at the same time, but this is still a hugely competent tablet. Featuring Apple's A13 Bionic chip, performance is said to be 20% faster than the previous 8th-gen (2020) 10.2-inch iPad. The Neural Engine in the A13 chip also enables new machine learning features like Live Text, which is able to recognize text in a photo that you can then take immediate action on.

The 9th-gen iPad is also the first 10.2-inch iPad to get Apple's True Tone display technology. This can automatically adjust screen colors to compensate for the color temperature of the ambient lighting around you, making for a more comfortable viewing experience.

Though the 8MP rear-facing camera remains unchanged, Apple has given the front-facing camera a huge upgrade. Out goes the old 1.2MP selfie cam, replaced by a 12MP snapper, now capable of recording video in Full HD (1080p). Its ultra-wide viewing angle also makes it compatible with Apple's Center Stage video call technology, whereby the camera automatically pans to keep you in view if you move around. If you're joined by other people, the camera detects them and smoothly zooms out to include them in the conversation.

Consider that 9th-gen iPad now starts with 64GB storage - double that of the previous version - yet the price remains the same: this latest 10.2-inch iPad is cracking value.

Best iPad stands (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Apple)
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4. iPad Mini (2021)

The best compact iPad for photographers

Specifications

Weight: 290g
Dimensions: 203.2 x 134.8 x 6.1 mm
OS: iPadOS 13
Screen size: 8.3-inch
Resolution: 1488 x 2266 pixels
CPU: A15 Bionic
Storage: 64GB/256GB
microSD slot: No
Battery: 5,124mAh
Rear camera: 12MP
Front camera: 12MP

Reasons to buy

+
Perfect portable size
+
Surprisingly powerful specs

Reasons to avoid

-
Bezel-heavy design
-
Noticeably pricier than 2019 Mini

The iPad Pro and 10.2-inch iPad are are big devices which offer great experiences for working on, but what about photographers who are often traveling? Carrying around such large iPads isn't always convenient, which is why the iPad Mini is such a great choice.

It comes in a compact size with an 8.3-inch display, yet it's also impressively powerful, with Apple's latest A15 Bionic processor that also powers the iPhone 13. Compared to compact Android tablets, the iPad Mini blows them out of the water when it comes to performance, and it can even compete with Apple's larger devices.

This is definitely the best iPad for photographers who spend a lot of time on the road.

• See also Best iPad Mini cases (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Apple)
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5. iPad Pro 12.9 (2020)

It may be a generation old, but the 2020 iPad Pro is still hugely impressive

Specifications

Weight: 639g
Dimensions: 280.4 x 214.8 x 5.8 mm
OS: iPadOS 14
Screen size: 12.9-inch
Resolution: 2048 x 2732 pixels
CPU: A12Z Bionic
Storage: 128GB/256GB/512GB/1TB
microSD slot: No
Battery: 9,720mAh
Rear cameras: 12MP wide (f/1.8), 10-MP ultra-wide (f/2.4)
Front camera: 7MP

Reasons to buy

+
Super-fast performance
+
Decent battery life
+
Full mouse/keyboard support

Reasons to avoid

-
Magic keyboard costs extra

Though it may look virtually identical to the 2018 version, the iPad Pro 12.9 for 2020 had undergone plenty of improvement, not least of which is the new A12Z Bionic chip that delivers faster performance across the board. 

While the 2020 version is no longer current, this iPad is still lightning-fast, and it's clear that Apple is gunning for its users to replace personal computers with this model. It's got support for the new Magic Keyboard (though that'll cost extra), and though app developers need to do some catching up to the new mouse/keyboard inputs offered by the new iPad, it's certainly a boon for photographers who may prefer this method of editing to the touchscreen.

Battery life is also majorly improved over the 2018 model, and given that this was one of that iPad's major flaws, it makes this edition pretty tough to come up with any arguments against. If you can foot the pretty hefty cost, then you'll enjoy serious processing power and a gorgeous display.

• See best iPad Pro cases (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Apple)
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6. iPad 10.2 (2020)

Still a great option for photographers

Specifications

Weight: 483g
Dimensions: 250.6 x 174.1 x 7.5mm
OS: iPadOS 13
Screen size: 10.2-inch
Resolution: 1620 x 2160 pixels
CPU: A10 Fusion
RAM: 3GB
Storage: 32/128GB
microSD slot: No
Battery: 8,827mAh
Rear camera: 8MP
Front camera: 1.2MP

Reasons to buy

+
Slightly bigger screen
+
Works with the Smart Keyboard

Reasons to avoid

-
Marginally better than iPad 9.7
-
iPad Air is superior for sketching

If you like the look of the iPad Pro, but its price tag puts you off - and you won't quite need all that power - then the iPad 10.2 is a brilliant choice. You still get a large and vibrant screen, and it supports most of the peripherals that the iPad Pro does, including the excellent Apple Pencil.

It's also had a bit of a specs upgrade since the previous model, and it now comes with an extra gigabyte of RAM. This makes all the difference when it comes to opening and using apps - they now feel faster and more responsive than ever before.

Add in the gorgeous design Apple is known for, and this more affordable iPad offers some brilliant features for many photographers.

(Image credit: Apple)
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7. iPad Air (2020)

A brilliant all-round iPad

Specifications

Weight: 458g
Dimensions: 247.4 x 178.3 x 6.1 mm
OS: iPadOS 15.1
Screen size: 10.9-inch
Resolution: 1640 x 2360 pixels
CPU: A14
Storage: 64GB/256GB
microSD slot: No
Rear camera: 12MP
Front camera: 7MP

Reasons to buy

+
Brilliant-looking laminated screen
+
Cheapest Smart Keyboard iPad

Reasons to avoid

-
Uses the 1st Gen Apple Pencil
-
Traditional design doesn't wow

If you want a bit more power than the entry-level iPads, but don't want to spend a huge amount on the iPad Pro, then the iPad Air is the best iPad for you. It's cheaper than the iPad Pro, while still offering a large screen and enough power to run photo editing apps with ease.

It is compatible with Apple's Smart Keyboard Cover, meaning you don't need to deal with tricky Bluetooth keyboard connections if you want to type up emails, documents and more.

It's all powered by Apple's A14 chipset, which is also used in the iPhone 12. This means it's a very fast tablet that's large enough to work on, while being thin and light enough to still easily carry around. A winning combination, in our book.

(Image credit: apple)
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8. iPad 9.7 (2017)

An oldie, but a goodie

Specifications

Weight: 469g
Dimensions: 240 x 169.5 x 7.5mm
OS: iPadOS 13
Screen size: 9.7-inch
Resolution: 1536 x 2048 pixels
CPU: A9
RAM: 2GB
Storage: 32GB/128GB
microSD slot: No
Battery: 8,827mAh
Rear camera: 8MP
Front camera: 1.2MP

Reasons to buy

+
Good screen quality
+
Powerful for the price

Reasons to avoid

-
Apple Pencil costs extra
-
Getting old

iPads are brilliant devices, but they can often be quite expensive. One of the best ways, then, to get an affordable iPad, is to buy one of the older models. Even though this iPad was released three years ago, it's still a brilliant performer, and while more modern iPads come with features and performance you won't get with this iPad, you can still run pretty much any app you want to on it.

The main selling point is the price, though. If you're a photographer who wants to get started with an iPad, but you're conscious of spending too much money on one of Apple's tablets, then going for the older iPad from 2017 is the best choice for you.

The best iPads: what are the different types of iPad and what do we look for?

As we mentioned, there are a range of iPads available, so what are the differences and how do you pick the best iPad for your needs?

Let's start off with the regular iPad. This is the best mid-range iPad that offers a large and vibrant screen (10.2-inches), whilst remaining thin and light enough to easily carry around with you. It has enough power to run photo and video editing apps without a hitch, and new models also support the Apple Pencil stylus (check out the best stylus for iPads (opens in new tab)). Crucially, the asking price of the iPad sits between the expensive iPad Pro and iPad mini when it comes to size and power, making it a great compromise. If you get the 2018 model, you get a smaller 9.7-inch screen, which may be more appealing to some people.

If you want something that's more portable then the iPad mini is the best iPad for you. With a screen size of 7.9 inches, this is an ideal tablet for carrying around with you. The screen is still large enough to use comfortably, and thanks to the gorgeously vibrant and sharp image quality, it's a great iPad for showing clients your work.

The latest modes also feature some of Apple's best hardware yet, and it's also compatible with the Apple Pencil, making it great for photo editing and doodling. The iPad mini used to be the cheapest iPads, but the most recent version is actually more expensive than the standard iPad - but considering the power and size, it's well worth the investment.

Then there's the iPad Air. This is a great compromise device that offers a larger 10.5-inch screen, while remaining affordable. And as the name suggests, it's also lightweight enough to comfortably carry around as well.

Finally, there's the top-of the range iPad Pro, which has been updated for 2021 with Apple's new M1 processing chip. These are larger, more powerful models of the iPad that come in 11-inch and 12.9-inch sizes, and feature power and performance that rival laptops. They are great for working on intensive apps, like video and photo editors, and if you're after an iPad that can double as a laptop (you'll need to buy a keyboard, however) then this is a good shout.

Read more:
Best cases for iPad Pro (opens in new tab)
Best stylus for iPads and iPhones (opens in new tab)
Best iPad keyboard (opens in new tab)
The best phablets (opens in new tab): big-screen smartphones
The best monitors for photographers (opens in new tab)
Best drawing tablets for photo editing (opens in new tab)
The best photo-editing laptops (opens in new tab)
The best desktop computers for photo editing (opens in new tab)

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For nearly two decades Sebastian's work has been published internationally. Originally specialising in Equestrianism, his visuals have been used by the leading names in the equestrian industry such as The Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), The Jockey Club, Horse & Hound and many more for various advertising campaigns, books and pre/post-event highlights.


He is a Fellow of The Royal Society of Arts, holds a Foundation Degree in Equitation Science and is a Master of Arts in Publishing.  He is member of Nikon NPS and has been a Nikon user since the film days using a Nikon F5 and saw the digital transition with Nikon's D series cameras and is still to this day the youngest member to be elected in to BEWA, The British Equestrian Writers' Association. 


He is familiar with and shows great interest in medium and large format photography with products by Phase One, Hasselblad, Alpa and Sinar and has used many cinema cameras from the likes of Sony, RED, ARRI and everything in between. His work covers the genres of Equestrian, Landscape, Abstract or Nature and combines nearly two decades of experience to offer exclusive limited-edition prints to the international stage from his film & digital photography.