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Apple due to slash iPhone 12 mini production by 20%

iPhone 12 Mini sales
(Image credit: Apple)

UPDATE 11/03: A new report is suggesting that Apple will be cutting its iPhone 12 mini (opens in new tab) production by 20% this year. Nikkei Asia is reporting that Apple is planning to cut the production of the smallest handset of the iPhone 12 family "as part of a broader adjustment to output plans". The mini won't be the only phone impacted, as Apple will also apparently be cutting orders for all iPhones by 20%.

However, the iPhone 12 mini is definitely bearing the brunt of the cuts, with Nikkei Asia reporting (opens in new tab) that the "mildest estimate was that Apple will cut planned production by more than 70% for the six months through June". 

• Read more: Best camera phone (opens in new tab)

Following the previous news (below) that the iPhone 12 mini is only making up 5% of sales for the entire iPhone 12 lineup, it appears like that future doesn't look good for the continued production of smaller handsets. 

ORIGINAL STORY: As camera phones get larger and larger, users with smaller hands have become frustrated with the lack of options. When the iPhone 12 mini was launched, many thought that this would be the revival of the smaller handset. Unfortunately, it looks as if the iPhone 12 mini hasn't been quite as popular with consumers as initially expected. 

According to a report published by Counterpoint Research (opens in new tab), sales of the iPhone 12 mini only made up 5% of the entire iPhone 12 lineup in January. Analyst William Yang also confirmed to Reuters that the overall sales for smaller phones now only account 10% of the overall market. 

As camera phones increased in size, the demand for a smaller phone with high-end specs seemingly increased too. Camera phones with displays that are smaller than six inches tend to fit better in most hands, offering a better single-handed experience. However, the popularity of smaller phones seems to be fading, based on the latest figures.

As reported (opens in new tab) by Reuters, the overall market for camera phones with sub-6" displays now only account for 10% of the overall market. As people consume more content on their camera phones, larger phones have seemingly increased in popularity, with video content and social media being the possible major driving force behind this. 

Smaller phones

(Image credit: Counterpoint)

Yang confirmed to Reuters that, due to the fall in sales for the iPhone 12 mini, Apple may stop its production for the second quarter. 

A Counterpoint analyst goes on to say: “This is in line with what we’re seeing in the broader global market, where screens under 6.0” now account for around 10% share of all smartphones sold." 

Apple has not yet confirmed whether it plans to continue iPhone 12 mini production. However, with the demand for smaller phones seemingly in decline, this could cause companies to rethink producing smaller variants in the future.

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With over a decade of photographic experience, Louise arms Digital Camera World with a wealth of knowledge on photographic technique and know-how – something at which she is so adept that she's delivered workshops for the likes of ITV and Sue Ryder. Louise also brings years of experience as both a web and print journalist, having served as features editor for Practical Photography magazine and contributing photography tutorials and camera analysis to titles including Digital Camera Magazine (opens in new tab) and  Digital Photographer (opens in new tab). Louise currently shoots with the Fujifilm X-T200 and the Nikon D800, capturing self-portraits and still life images, and is DCW's ecommerce editor, meaning that she knows good camera, lens and laptop deals when she sees them.