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The best book scanner in 2022

Best book scanner: woman scanning a book in a library
(Image credit: CZUR)

For most people, their first experience with a scanner is a flatbed, designed to take an image one at a time under a door. If transferring an entire book, or archive, to digital form is your goal then a dedicated book scanner will take hours – perhaps days – off the process.

Good book scanners are built to speed up every part of the process which would otherwise be repeated by the user; instead of a moving scanner, a camera is held far enough above that it can capture the page fast. Nevertheless even though it’s measured in seconds, time-per-page is a factor which can add up for books of 300-400 pages.

Mechanisms to recognize page turning keep times down too; some scanners come with pedals so the operator can turn pages with their hands, hold them in place, and initiate a scan without the book slamming shut. There are even some which use AI to detect the page turns.

If you’re planning on scanning a lot of shiny pages, then scanners which offer lower or more diagonal illumination may help avoid reflections. Another great hardware feature to look for is laser sensors which can detect the three-dimensional shape of the pages. These assist the algorithms which replicate original flat pages in the scans offered by even more scanners, but usually hardware measurements offer the process an advantage.

Finally don’t forget that if book scanning is only one function of a scanner for you, then we’ve also got a guides to document scanners and document cameras.

The best book scanner in 2022

(Image credit: Xerox)

1. CZUR ET18 Pro

A book scanner which will overcome paper curves

Specifications

Resolution: 16 Megapixels / 4896 x 3672 px
Shooting area: A3+ (420 x 297 mm)
Speed: 1.5 sec / page
Book thickness: 35mm
Live View: 20fps at 1080p
Size: 362 x 352 x 149 mm (259 x 163 x 39 mm (folded))
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 1500g

Reasons to buy

+
Rapid scanning
+
Laser scanner measures book’s curve
+
Mac and PC compatible
+
Anti-reflection light positioning

Reasons to avoid

-
CZUR are raising funding for a 24-MP version
-
Presentation mode (live view) only 20fps
-
AI occasionally fooled 

The CZUR ET scanners are built to help blast through scanning entire books and can export to JPEG, PDF, searchable PDF, Word, Excel and TIFF via USB or Wi-Fi. A small LCD of the scanning area at the top helps line things up, while a included button and foot pedals speed things along. Processing will not only use the 3 built-in lasers to flatten the output images but also – if you use the finger grips – recognize, and remove your fingers automatically. All this automation makes it possible to blast through a 300-page book in under ten minutes. With over 180 languages of OCR available through the included ABBYY software, this is a powerful way to quickly digitize archives. Admittedly we think Czur are pushing it when they call the device itself ‘minimalist and exquisite,’ but by having side lights halfway up the post the scanner illuminates the page from an angle with avoids reflection. For us at least better scans matter more! 

(Image credit: Xerox)

2. Fujitsu ScanSnap SV600

Tried and tested archiving scanner

Specifications

Resolution: megapixels not stated / 600ppi max interpolated
Shooting area: A3 (300 x 400mm)
Speed: 3 sec / page
Book thickness: 30mm
Live View: -
Size: 383 x 210 x 156 mm
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 3000g

Reasons to buy

+
600ppi resolution scan option
+
Popular choice with archivists
+
Large scanning area

Reasons to avoid

-
The scanner itself is unchanged in 8 years
-
No live-view option

Rather than directing a high resolution camera downward like many document scanners, the ScanSnap SV600 still conducts linear scans, adjusting focus as it goes to avoid the potential for distortion in the image corners. While the lights remain in the same spot, the brightness adjusts as the scan swoops across the page too. Software efficiency tools are impressive too; an A3 landscape in three seconds and the scanner is happy with bound pages up to 30mm thick too. It can compensate for curvature, producing perfectly flat-looking scans, and detect and separate multiple documents on the bed. ABBYY OCR is also included, meaning extraction of scannable & editable text is feasible, and indeed the quality should help. Resolution is good, with 150, 200, 300 and 600 dpi modes (all at 3 seconds), which should please the design agencies, studios, galleries and professional archiving services in mind.  

(Image credit: Xerox)

3. Czur Aura Mate Pro

Dual-camera document scanner with book-flattening capability

Specifications

Resolution: 16 Megapixels / 4608 x 3456 px
Shooting area: A3 (460 x 345mm)
Speed: 2 sec / page
Book thickness: 30mm
Live View: 1080P @ 20fps
Size: 372 x 180 x 443 mm (180 x 130 x 443mm folded)
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 1650g

Reasons to buy

+
Folding design
+
Built-in webcam
+
Stylish desk lamp mode with adjustable color temperature
+
Available in choice of colors

Reasons to avoid

-
Webcam is around 2 megapixels
-
Cloud scanning may trouble privacy enthusiasts

The Aura Mate Pro is Czur’s answer to the mobile worker’s book scanner and presentation tool; a document scanner equipped with much of their processing functionality from their dedicated devices with extra features for online meetings, not least of which is a second camera in the post, ideal for a lecturer sharing a book or a students in a Zoom class, though the addition of wi-fi might be more useful more often.

As well as working with your computer (Mac and Windows), you can use your phone with an complete enough to remind you to adjust your posture if you’ve been using it long enough! It might be portable, but the inclusion of a foot pedal makes clear Czur still take the book scanning functionality seriously; OCR software and page flattening isn’t left out. The lamp-like design includes a 320 x 240 px preview LCD and (especially compared to its sibling) looks gorgeous – Pixar would be proud. 

Best book scanner - IPEVO V4K PRO

(Image credit: Xerox)

4. IPEVO V4K PRO

Portable document scanner for sharing book pages on the go

Specifications

Resolution: 8 Megapixels / 3264 x 2448 px
Shooting area: 342 x 255mm
Speed: -
Book thickness: [not stated]
Live View: 3264 x 2448P at 30fps
Size: 277 x 78 x 48 mm (folded)
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 581g

Reasons to buy

+
EmpFolds small for travel
+
Excellent noise cancellation for online classroom use
+
Adjustable exposure and focus

Reasons to avoid

-
Book scanning is a secondary function
-
Single LED light can be uneven or cause reflection

Many of us are involved in sharing parts of documents, including books, in live online presentations and lectures; step forward the modern-day overhead projector: a document camera. One of the our favorites is the IPEVO V4K Pro, which took one of the most popular designs on the market and refined the microphone with smart AI noise reduction. The camera can easily be directed at a book, either to produce a live view or to capture still images, on a Mac, PC or Chromebook. It’s not equipped with all the rapid page processing tools of the Czur or SV600, but it can definitely tackle capturing a few pages for work, which is why it sports a higher resolution autofocus camera than required simply for 1080P live streaming. We also liked the fetching bottle green shade, and it’s hard to deny the relatively low cost of a product dedicated without book scanning tools.

(Image credit: Xerox)

5. Xerox XD-Combo

If the book doesn’t need to survive, consider sheet-feeding

Specifications

Resolution: 600ppi
Shooting area: 330 x 428mm
Speed: 25 pages per minute
Max Resolution: 600ppi
Book thickness: 35 sheets
Live View: No
Size: 401 x 330 x 140 mm
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 2700g

Reasons to buy

+
Ideal for separated pages
+
Mac and PC compatible
+
Scans up to 25 pages a minute
+
Cheaper than many pillar style book scanners

Reasons to avoid

-
Books need to be unbound to be scanned
-
Separate power supply and USB connection

This is a full duplex sheet feeding scanner, which, by taking pages from a pile and scanning both sides, might be a more useful tool for some archiving tasks. It’s certainly quick; Xerox say a user can plough through 1,500 scans a day so, if the book will be discarded after scanning, why not un-bind it so the scans can be run more quickly through the scanner?

In practice this technology – which Xerox commonly place atop photocopiers – does prefer perfectly trimmed pages, but if that’s something you can provide the system will churn out images at 25 pages per minute which eclipses even the most powerful book scanners once the page turning is accounted for. We were also impressed that banners up to 3m (118 inches) could be scanned if required; you’ve got to admire flexibility. There is also the option of standard one-off 600ppi scans from under the lid, always a handy option to have in the office; all this for a relatively modestly priced device.

(Image credit: Xerox)

6. IRIScan Desk 5

Budget option for scanning smaller books

Specifications

Resolution: 8 Megapixels
Shooting area: A4/Letter
Speed: 2 sec / page (B&W)
Max Resolution: 300ppi
Book thickness: 30mm
Live View: 1080p
Size: 267 x 85 x 75 mm
Connectivity: USB
Weight: 620g

Reasons to buy

+
Relatively light and portable
+
OCR with 138 languages
+
Automatically detects page turn

Reasons to avoid

-
Curve compensation AI could be better
-
IRIScan Desk software not Mac compatible

IRIScan Desk 5 (and bigger brother Desk 5 PRO) are built to handle A4 (letter) and A3 (tabloid) sizes. The smaller Desk 5 is a great choice if you’re not looking to capture large documents as Canon-subsidiary IRIS have kept the feature-list trim while including all the archiving essentials – assuming, that is, you’re not using a Mac. These are edge detection, cropping, finger detection and deletion. There is even page turn detection, eliminating the need for a pedal switch.

The supplied software also allows live view dual-screening with your (Windows) computer’s webcam, making for an alternative to switching between views in a e-learning situation. We also appreciated that the device is entirely powered by its USB connection so painless to transport.

Don’t forget your phone!

While it’s unlikely to be something you’ll want to do on an industrial scale, or even for a whole book, it’s worth remembering that your camera phone likely includes a camera at least capable of putting up a fight against some of those featured by the scanners on these lists, and might well have them beaten when it comes to processing power. This isn’t lost on developers either, and there are a good range of scanning tools out there, perhaps the most useful of which (beyond the built-in note tools) is Adobe Scan (from Apple App Store or Google Play), which is not only straightforward in its design but features reliable OCR and can output clean PDFs. 

Read more
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With over 20 years of expertise as a tech journalist, Adam brings a wealth of knowledge across a vast number of product categories, including timelapse cameras, home security cameras, NVR cameras, photography books, webcams, 3D printers and 3D scanners, borescopes, radar detectors… and, above all, drones. 


Adam is our resident expert on all aspects of camera drones and drone photography, from buying guides on the best choices for aerial photographers of all ability levels to the latest rules and regulations on piloting drones. 


He is the author of a number of books including The Complete Guide to Drones, The Smart Smart Home Handbook, 101 Tips for DSLR Video and The Drone Pilot's Handbook