13 best free photography apps for iPhone

13 best free photography apps for iPhone

The best camera is the one you have on you, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make the most of the snapper in your pocket. Apple’s iPhone is the most widely used “camera” on Flickr, while the number of photography apps for iPhone has probably reached the thousands by now.

But you don’t have to shell out hard earned cash (or iTunes credit) to pimp out your iPhone, as we take a look at the best free photography apps for iPhone right here.

ALSO SEE: Best photo apps for photographers reviewed and rated

13 best free photography apps for iPhone

All of the free photography apps for iPhone in this list were available at the time of writing.

13 best free photography apps for iPhone: Instagram 13 best free photography apps for iPhone: Instagram

Best Photography Apps for iPhone: Instagram

 

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably already heard of Instagram, but it’s still worth a mention here in case you haven’t already checked it out.

A neat way to funk up your photos with retro photography effects and borders, you can also share the resulting images on the Instagram network, via Twitter or Facebook.

Find out more about Instagram

No. 1: Instagram
No. 2: Photo Editor by Aviary
No. 3: PicStitch
No. 4: Muzy
No. 5: Photoshop Express
No. 6: SP Photo Fix Lite
No. 7: Facebook Camera
No. 8: Pudding Camera
No. 9: Polarize
No. 10: Piictu
No. 11: Magic Hour Lite
No. 12: DMD Panorama
No. 13: PowerCam

READ MORE

44 essential digital camera tips and tricks
Digital camera effects from A-Z
Famous Photographers: 225 tips to inspire you
The 55 Best Photographers of All Time. In the history of the world. Ever.
21 fun photography facts you probably never knew
99 common photography problems (and how to solve them)

  • jmeyer

    Hi Karen, you’re right, Hipstamatic sadly isn’t free. Though it’s only £1.99! Were we to do a list of paid-for apps (hmm…) it would certainly make the cut.

  • jmeyer

    Hi Tenty, thanks for the heads up. That’s odd, because it was free to download when we were writing the article. Perhaps it’s changed? We’ll look into it.