Double trouble! How to use the multiple exposure options on a Canon camera

Canon
(Image credit: Future)

Even non-photographers will be familiar with the term double exposure. It’s the effect created when two separate photos are merged with each other to create an artistic picture combining the colors and shapes of each into a new abstract shot.

While the technique originally started with film photography, we’re now able to create them digitally in-camera or in software, the best Canon EOS cameras have a multiple exposure mode that make it easy to pull off.

PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine

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Dan Mold
Deputy Editor

Deputy Editor on PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, Dan also brings his technical wizardry and editing skills to Digital Camera World. He has been writing about all aspects of photography for over 10 years, having previously served as technical writer and technical editor for Practical Photography magazine, as well as Photoshop editor on Digital Photo


Dan is an Adobe-certified Photoshop guru, making him officially a beast at post-processing – so he’s the perfect person to share tips and tricks both in-camera and in post. Able to shoot all genres, Dan provides news, techniques and tutorials on everything from portraits and landscapes to macro and wildlife, helping photographers get the most out of their cameras, lenses, filters, lighting, tripods, and, of course, editing software.