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These camera bags are Morally Toxic

Morally Toxic
(Image credit: Morally Toxic)

Morally Toxic may be a new name in camera bags, but the brand actually comes from 3 Legged Thing, the British manufacturer of some of the best tripods with rock ’n roll-inspired names such as Ray, Winston and Brian. 

First in the range is a backpack, which goes by the name Valkyrie, and a messenger bag Wraith. Valkyrie comes in 20-liter ($299.99 / £259.99 / approx AU$413.52) and 25-liter ($309.99 / £269.99 / approx AU$426.26) capacities, while Wraith is available in 15-liter ($209.99 / £169.99 / approx AU$288.75) and 20-liter ($219.99 / £179.99 / approx AU$302.50) sizes. 

• Read more: Best camera bags

In both cases, the larger bag has a sleeve for a 15-inch laptop, while the smaller bag can accommodate a 13-inch device. The main compartments of the bags have a clever divider system, with attached pockets for storing cables, filters and the like, that can be customized to fit your camera kit.

Available in 25L and 20L capacities and with copious compartments, the Valkyrie has plenty of space to store your gear (Image credit: Morally Toxic)

However, the big USP is a ‘frog pocket’ – a separately accessible waterproof compartment that can be used to stash wet gear such as rain jackets, while the rest of your kit remains snug and dry. In more clement conditions the pocket can be used to  store additional camera gear or minimized to give more storage in the main compartment. 

There’s also a plethora of compartmentalized organizer pockets for storing all your bits and pieces, including a ‘hidden’ pocket for valuables, and a stretchy side pocket for water bottles. 

In addition, the Valkyrie has bungee strapping for tucking away things like fleeces, as well as a tripod carry system, plus there’s removable memory card pocket. The Wraith has various carrying strap attachments so it can be worn messenger or sling-style, and can be attached to a roller bag.  

A 'secret' pocket stores your cash and passport, or other things you might want to keep from prying fingers (Image credit: Morally Toxic)

On the outside the bags come with blue, green or black finishes (or 'emerald', 'sapphire' and 'onyx', as Morally Toxic would have it), and the seemingly random design is actually based on a reproduction of a vintage map of Stagsden – the town in Bedfordshire, England, where the company is based. The tough material is water-resistant, and there’s an additional pull-out waterproof raincover. 

The company’s ethical code minimizes waste materials, while any off-cuts are recycled. Minimal plastic is employed, but where it is needed recycled ocean plastics are used, when possible.

All models have a 'frog pocket' for stashing wet gear safely away from your precious camera kit (Image credit: Morally Toxic)

With some neat features and an eye-catching design, the Morally Toxic range oozes cool and could shake up the camera bag market in the same way that 3 Legged Thing did to camera supports.

All bags come with a five-year warranty, and if that's not enough to persuade you, there's a free 'art card' with each bag.

Valkyrie and Wraith are available to pre-order with an introductory 20% discount via the MorallyToxic.com website and selected retailers. The products will be shipped and available in-store from 01 November 2021.

Pre-order Morally Toxic bags at B&H (USA & worldwide)
Pre-order Morally Toxic bags at Park (UK)

Morally Toxic

A strap on the Wriath enables the bag to slip on to a roller bag.  (Image credit: Morally Toxic)

Read more: 

Best messenger bags for photographers
Best camera sling bags
Best roller camera bags

Adam Waring

Adam has been the editor of N-Photo: The Nikon Magazine for almost 12 years, and as such is one of Digital Camera World's leading experts when it comes to all things Nikon-related. 


Whether it’s reviews and hands-on tests of the latest Nikon cameras and lenses, sharing his skills using filters, tripods, lighting, L brackets and other photography equipment, or trading tips and techniques on shooting landscapes, wildlife and almost any genre of photography, Adam is always on hand to provide his insights. 


Prior to his tenure on N-Photo, Adam was also a veteran of publications such as PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, so his wealth of photographic knowledge isn’t solely limited to the Big N.