The best Sony RX100 V deals in September 2018

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One of the most advanced compact cameras we’ve ever seen, the Sony RX100 V goes way beyond what we'd normally expect from a pocket camera. 

It's a premium camera with a premium price, but if you want to get your hands on one, you're best off checking out our great deals below. Here's a little more on what makes the camera special and the best RX100 Mark V prices right now.

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Sony RX100 V Key Specs

Superb performance inside a tiny body, this is a camera that impresses

Sensor: 1-inch, 20.1MP | Lens: 24-70mm, f/1.8-2.8 | Monitor: 3.0-inch tilt-angle display, 1,228,800 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Continuous shooting: 24fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert

24fps burst shooting
Superb image and video quality
Some minor handling issues
Price

So what do your pennies get you? The sensor is the star of the show, with 20.1MP spread across a 1in chip, and a stacked architecture with a separate DRAM chip for high performance. Among other things, this allows the camera to fire at 24fps with autofocus and auto-exposure maintained throughout, as well as reduced rolling shutter in video recording.

Video itself is also a highlight, with 4K recording heading a list of impressive specs that include various slow-motion options, zebra patterning and Log shooting. You can also pop up a high-quality 2.36million-dot electronic viewfinder on demand, and tilt the touchscreen to face various positions. 

The 24-70mm equiv. f/1.8-2.8 lens, meanwhile, draws in plenty of light to let you use lower ISOs in low-light conditions, with that wide maximum aperture also helping to separate subjects from their surroundings. On top of all of the above, you get a 315-point AF system and a variety of focusing options, as well as an built-in ND filter that lets you record videos easier in bright light (and long exposures, of course).

So what's not to like? Well, the 220-shot battery life is somewhat average, and handling could be improved. Even so, this remains a camera where you get what you pay for: a solid imaging pipeline, masses of features and a stellar performance across both stills and movie capture. 

Similar cameras: Sony RX100 Mark IV, Fujifilm XF10, Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II