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The best Nikon telephoto lenses in 2020: zooms for every budget

best Nikon telephoto lenses
(Image credit: Getty Images)

How to pick the best Nikon telephoto lenses? Owners of the best Nikon cameras are spoilt for choice, with a catalogue of lenses that ranges from modest zooms bearing wide maximum apertures, to super-telephoto zooms that stretch to 500mm. 

To make it easier for you to figure out which is the best far-reaching lens for you, we've put together this guide to the best Nikon F-mount telephoto lenses around right now. There are actually a number of hyper-telephoto 150-600mm lenses on the market as well, but we have a separate buyer’s guide for those: the best 150-600mm lenses.

You might be tempted to stick to own-brand Nikon lenses, but it'd be a mistake not to more fully consider your options. Third-party manufacturers such as Tamron and Sigma are making excellent optics for all sorts of different users, and many of these are as good or even better than Nikon's own-brand lenses, with the added benefit of generally being more affordable.

• See also The best telephoto lenses

One thing to watch out for is that some of the more recent lenses feature an electromagnetically controlled diaphragm. Compared with the mechanical lever traditionally used in Nikon’s F mount lens system, this enables greater consistency in aperture control, especially when shooting in high-speed continuous drive mode; the downside is that aperture control is incompatible with older Nikon bodies, including the D300s, D3000 and D5000.

Read on for our pick of the telephoto zooms that currently win out for price and performance.

Affordable telephotos

Nikon AF-P 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR

1. Nikon AF-P 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6E ED VR

An excellent performer, and it’s recently become more affordable

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Stepping Motor | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.2m | Filter thread: 67mm | Dimensions (WxL): 84 x 146mm | Weight: 680g

New-generation autofocus and aperture control
Superb optical stabilizer and image quality
No focus distance scale
Incompatible with a variety of older DSLRs

We were always big fans of Nikon’s AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED VR and this recently launched replacement is even better. It features a ‘Pulse’ stepping motor autofocus system that’s incredibly fast and essentially silent in operation, and there’s also an electromagnetically controlled diaphragm; the only catch is that both of these systems make the lens incompatible with a number of older Nikon DSLRs.

The VR system is particularly effective, with 4.5-stop performance and a switchable ‘Sport VR’ mode, ideal for tracking erratically moving objects through the viewfinder. The weather-resistant construction feels robust, and the lens is a top performer in terms of handling and image quality, although some may be disappointed at the lack of a focus distance scale. Since launch, the average selling price has dropped by almost a third, making this lens much better value.

Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

2. Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

Simply the best budget 70-300mm zoom on the market

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: No | Minimum focus distance: 1.5m | Filter thread: 62mm | Dimensions (WxL): 82 x 143mm | Weight: 765g

Ring-type ultrasonic autofocus
Effective optical stabilization
No weather seals
No electromagnetic aperture control

It’s not the outright cheapest telephoto zoom on the market, but, considering that it has fast, whisper-quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus, plus highly effective optical stabilization, it's a steal at the price.

Unlike many of Tamron’s more recent, up-market lenses, it’s not weather-sealed, but the overall standard of build quality is still very good.

Aided by the inclusion of both an LD (Low Dispersion) and an XLD (eXtra Low Dispersion) element, levels of sharpness and contrast are very pleasing, and colour fringing is well controlled. All in all, you can’t buy better if you’re in the market for a budget 70-300mm lens. 

Unlike some Nikon tele-zooms, the Tamron is compatible with FX as well as DX-format bodies, and its conventional autofocus and aperture control systems make it compatible with older DSLRs.

(Image credit: Nikon)

3. Nikon Z DX 50-250mm f/4.5-6.3 VR

A perfect match for the Z 50 mirrorless DX body

Mount: Nikon Z DX | Full-frame compatible: No | Autofocus type: Stepping motor | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 0.5-1.0m | Filter thread: 62mm | Dimensions (WxL): 74 x 110mm | Weight: 305g

Compact, lightweight build
5-stop optical stabilizer
No weather-seals
Relatively narrow aperture rating

The Nikon Z 50 is available in an attractive twin-lens kit that includes this telephoto lens as well as the Z 16-50mm standard zoom. Also sold separately, it matches the latter in having a space-saving retractable design and is refreshingly lightweight, helped by the inclusion of a plastic rather than metal mounting plate. Typical of Z-mount Nikon lenses, it has a ‘pulse’ stepping motor autofocus system that’s quick and virtually silent, plus an electromagnetically controlled aperture diaphragm. The aperture itself shrinks to a fairly narrow f/6.3 at the long end of the zoom range but that helps to keep the size and weight down. The zoom range itself is equivalent to 75-350mm in full-frame terms. Image quality is very convincing in all respects and sharpness is enhanced in practical terms by a highly effective 5-stop optical VR system.

Premium telephotos

(Image credit: Sigma)

4. Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 DG OS HSM Sport

Fast and hardy, this lens never misses a moment

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Hyper Sonic Motor | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.2m | Filter thread: 82mm | Dimensions (WxL): 94.2 x 202.9mm | Weight: 1,850g

Intelligent and effective image stabilisation
High-speed autofocus
Large and bulky
Sizeable filter thread

The Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 DG OS HSM joins the 'Sport' line, and as this name implies, speed is very much the name of the game here. The lens has been designed with outstanding action capture in mind, and it hits this mark pretty perfectly. It boasts class-leading autofocus speeds and an Intelligent OS that provides effective, algorithm-led image stabilisation in all camera orientations.

Water- and oil-repellent coatings on the front of the lens ensure that it can stand up to challenging weather conditions. There's also a focus limiter and a manual override switch to give you very precise control over how your autofocusing works. The drawbacks? All this tech doesn't come cheap, and it also makes the lens pretty heavy even with the magnesium-alloy construction, so bear this in mind before you buy.

Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2

5. Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2

A pro-spec lens with a consumer-friendly price tag

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 0.95m | Filter thread: 77mm | Dimensions (WxL): 88 x 194mm | Weight: 1,485g

Incredibly quick and accurate autofocus
Class-leading 3-mode stabilizer
Pro-grade build and image quality
Like other 70-200mm f/2.8 lenses, it’s fairly weighty

Nikon’s latest and greatest AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8 FL ED VR lens is undeniably spectacular, but this Tamron does everything pretty much as well, and for just half the price. It has an astonishingly fast autofocus system and a triple-mode optical stabilizer, with the third mode being similar to Nikon’s ‘VR Sport’ mode – this applies stabilization only during exposures, making it easier to track erratically moving objects in the viewfinder.

On top of that, the Tamron’s VC (Vibration Compensation) system is a stop more effective than the Nikon’s, with class-leading 5-stop performance. The weather-sealed build quality doesn’t feel quite as robust as that of the Nikon lens, but it’s pretty close, and image quality is epic in every respect.

Tamron 70-210mm f/4 Di VC USD

6. Tamron 70-210mm f/4 Di VC USD

It keeps the weight and cost down, but bigs up the quality

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 0.95m | Filter thread: 67mm | Dimensions (WxL): 76 x 177mm | Weight: 850g

Premium performance with great value
Good build quality
A little lacking in features compared with the latest Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 G2

This Tamron lens is full-frame compatible, but gives a slightly longer effective zoom range on DX-format DSLRs than comparable 70-200mm lenses, equivalent to 105-315mm in full-frame terms. 

The Tamron’s optical image stabilizer is similarly effective for static shots but less so for panning; it lacks a switchable ‘Active’ mode, but nevertheless works well when shooting from an idling vehicle or other non-steady platform.

Image quality isn’t quite as sharp as from Nikon's own telephoto lenses but it’s still very impressive in all respects. The construction includes weather seals and a keep-clean fluorine coating on the front element.

(Image credit: Nikon)

7. Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S

It’s a heavyweight hitter in every way

Mount: Nikon Z FX | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Stepping motor | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 0.5-1.0m | Filter thread: 77mm | Dimensions (WxL): 89 x 220mm | Weight: 1,440g

Stunning image quality and performance
Rock-solid build quality
Expensive to buy
Typically large and heavy

70-200mm f/2.8 lenses are incredibly versatile, often favoured for everything from action sports and wildlife to portraiture, weddings and event photography. Nikon really has gone for glory with the design of this lens, which features a feast of high-end glass, including two aspherical elements, six ED (Extra-low Dispersion) elements, a fluorite element and a short-wave refractive element. High-tech ARNEO and Nano Crystal Coat are added for good measure. Although typically big and heavy for this class of lens, handling benefits from a removable tripod mounting ring, two customisable L.Fn (Lens Function) buttons and a multi-mode OLED information display. The lens also features rapid dual autofocus stepping motors and 5-stop optical stabilization. Everything’s wrapped up in a sturdy pro-grade, weather-sealed build, complete with a fluorine coating on the front element.

Long-range telephotos

Tamron 100-400mm f/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD

8. Tamron 100-400mm f/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD

You get a lot of reach for your money

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.5m | Filter thread: 67mm | Dimensions (WxL): 86 x 199mm | Weight: 1,115g

King-size zoom range
Relatively lightweight and cost-effective
Aperture at 400mm is a slow f/6.3
The tripod mounting ring costs extra

Weighing barely more than a kilogram, this Tamron is much lighter than most 70-200mm f/2.8 lenses, but gives you twice as much telephoto reach at the long end of its zoom range – if you’ve upgraded from a DX camera with a 70-300mm lens, and are missing the 1.5x crop factor on your FX body, it can give you back some of your lost reach. The lens is sturdy and robust, despite its relatively light weight compared with the likes of Nikon’s AF-S 80-400mm VR, and incorporates weather seals.

Performance benefits from super-fast autofocus, 4-stop dual-mode stabilization, and an autofocus limiter that you can use to select either the short or long section of the focusing range. Best of all, image quality is every bit as good as from Nikon’s heavier and pricier 80-400mm VR.

Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C

9. Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C

This Sigma scores highly on the bang-per-buck scale

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 1.6m | Filter thread: 67mm | Dimensions (WxL): 86 x 182mm | Weight: 1,160g

Conveniently compact for a 100-400mm zoom
Refined handling and impressive performance
Only the mounting plate is weather-sealed
There’s no optional tripod mounting collar

A little more compact and lightweight than the competing Tamron 100-400mm lens, and rather less heavy than the Nikon 80-400mm (below), this ‘Contemporary’ zoom from Sigma still feels solid and sturdy. 

It even has a dual-mode zoom mechanism, which you can operate by twisting the conventional zoom ring or with a push-pull action of the barrel; the supplied lens hood is specially shaped for the latter option.

Impressive image quality benefits from the inclusion of four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements and, like the much pricier Nikon 80-400mm, there are switchable auto/manual-priority AF modes. 

Two custom settings can be applied to tailor the autofocus and stabilization systems to your requirements, via Sigma’s optional USB dock. It’s a great lens for the money, although the lack of an optional tripod mounting ring might be a bit of an upset.

Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR

10. Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR

Great value for an own-brand Nikon lens, with monster reach

Mount: Nikon F | Full-frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring-type) | Stabilizer: Yes | Electromagnetic diaphragm: Yes | Minimum focus distance: 2.2m | Filter thread: 95mm | Dimensions (WxL): 108 x 268mm | Weight: 2,300g

Seriously strong telephoto reach
Electromagnetic aperture control
A bit hefty for prolonged handheld shooting
Filter thread is very large at 95mm

Despite its reasonable asking price this Nikon lens certainly isn’t lacking in advanced features, including very fast ring-type ultrasonic autofocus, an electromagnetically controlled aperture, and a 4.5-stop stabilizer complete with Sport VR mode. 

It’s also unusual for this class of super-telephoto zoom in having a constant rather than variable aperture, with f/5.6 remaining available throughout the entire zoom range.

Three ED (Extra-low Dispersion) elements help to boost sharpness and contrast while reducing colour fringing. The Nikon doesn’t have quite the maximum telephoto reach of competing Sigma and Tamron 150-600mm lenses, but it comes very close, and it's great value at the price.

Read more:
The best Nikon lenses in 2019
The best Nikon cameras
The 8 best portrait lenses for Nikon users
The best superzoom lenses for Nikon DX DSLRs
The best macro lenses in 2019
The best 50mm lenses
The best 70-200mm lenses
The best budget telephoto lenses
The best 150-600mm lenses
The best 100-400mm lenses