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The best gloves for photographers in 2022

Best gloves for photographers

The best gloves for photographers need to do two things – keep you warm, and allow you to operate a camera. 

Big, wintry gardening gloves don't give you the dexterity needed to work a shutter release button or a settings dial, never mind a touchscreen. What you need is a pair of gloves that are well-insulated and warm – ideally windproof and waterproof, with a good grip – but also have touchscreen compatibility. 

Whether you're planning a landscape shoot, a long stint spotting wildlife, or a day of flying a drone for creative aerial images, a good pair of photographer's gloves will quickly become your best friend. 

The choice is extremely varied, so for this guide we've given you plenty of options to pick from. There is a bit of variation as to what's available where, with some gloves shipping in some territories and not others, so bear that in mind when browsing. Ultimately though, there should be photography gloves here for all users, at all budgets, from all over the world.

So let's get started!

Best gloves for photographers

(Image credit: North Face)
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1. The North Face Etip gloves

The best gloves for photographers overall

Specifications

Colors: Available in gray, black and heather
Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL

Reasons to buy

+
Feel like a second skin
+
Touchscreen capability

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the warmest

The stretchiness of the North Face Etip gloves makes them a pleasure to shoot with: they feel more like a second skin that enables you to feel small controls and lens rings. While you can't really beat fold-back fingertips for control, these non-foldable tips are still supple enough for you to feel recessed buttons.

Every finger and thumb tip features invisible Etip conductive tech: perfect for multi-finger swiping on a touchpad. And you get an effective grippy coating on the palms.

It's probably best if you don’t expect ultimate insulation in very cold climates from these gloves. 

• See also Best touchsensitive gloves (opens in new tab)

(Image credit: Pgytech Photography Gloves)
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2. Pgytech Photography Gloves

Great in the cold, these gloves are also a good choice for drone users

Specifications

Colors: Available in black
Sizes: M, L, XL

Reasons to buy

+
Waterproof
+
Triple-insulated
+
Fingerless option

Reasons to avoid

-
No small sizes

Built tough, with three-layer insulation and strong, tear-resistant fabric, the Pgytech Photography Gloves are great for wintry days spent trekking the hills and the fens looking for landscape images. They're also designed with drone users in mind, so if you've been looking for warming gloves to help you operate those control sticks for longer, these are a good bet. They're touchscreen-compatible, though some of the fingers also have a cut-off option if you prefer the extra dexterity. The anti-slip palm material is also a good bit of extra insurance that you're not about to drop your camera in the snow. 

There are no sizes below medium, which is a little restrictive, but if you're got big enough hands to fit them, the Pgytech gloves are a good, lasting choice that will see you through many image-making winters to come. 

Best gloves for photographers: Swarovski GP Gloves Pro

(Image credit: Swarovski)

3. Swarovski GP Gloves Pro

A premium glove by the venerable jewellery makers

Specifications

Colors: Available in green
Sizes: 7, 7.5, 8, 8.5, 9, 9.5, 10, 10.5

Reasons to buy

+
Stylish finish
+
Insulated but breathable

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive

Swarovski brings its premium style to the world of gloves; this pair has been designed for pretty much any outdoor activity, from hunting to photography. The touchscreen-friendly index and middle fingers make it easy to operate digital devices, and the Sympatex membrane is water-repellent and windproof while still being breathable, making them comfortable to wear for long periods. Swarovski says that the pre-formed fingers makes the gloves feel 'broken in' from the first wear, helping you get over some of that new-glove awkwardness.

They come at a premium price, certainly costing more than the other gloves on this list. Unlike many other gloves, these come in numbered sizes from 7.5 to 10.5; Swarovski recommends measuring the circumference of your knuckles with a lightly clenched hand. This measurement in inches should roughly correspond to the size of gloves you need. 

(Image credit: Vallerret)
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4. Vallerret Women’s Nordic Photography Gloves

Luxury gloves for female photographers

Specifications

Colors: Available in gray and black
Sizes: XS, S, M, L

Reasons to buy

+
Perfect fit for females
+
Good grip

Reasons to avoid

-
A little pricey

Sized and shaped for female photographers, the Nordic is lined with merino wool and has Thinsulate insulation. These make a nice change from the larger gloves that only tend to fit male hands. 

It features a flip-back forefinger and thumb, so you can handle your camera's fine controls, and change lenses or apply filters easily. Non-slip material on the palm side helps give you a good grip, and each glove has a small pocket to hold items like a memory card. One even has a tripod release plate key on a lanyard. They can be a little hard to find outside the US, so international readers might want to consider another option. 

(Image credit: SealSkinz)
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5. SealSkinz Ultra Grip Gloves

These gloves are waterproof and breathable

Specifications

Colors: Available in black
Sizes: S, M, L, XL

Reasons to buy

+
100% waterproof
+
Rubber grip on fingers and palms

Reasons to avoid

-
Not quite warm for winter conditions

If you often find yourself working in wet and windy conditions (as landscape photographers are sometimes wont to do), then waterproof gloves can be an absolute lifesaver. With these gloves, no more do you have to worry about the torrential rain eventually seeping through to your fingers – you can even plunge your hands into water (useful for it you drop a lens cap into the drink). 

Not only are the SealSkinz gloves waterproof, but they also have rubber grips on the fingers and palms to help you keep hold of your camera gear and adjust settings without any hassle. The forefinger tips and thumbs are also compatible with touchscreens as well. 

(Image credit: Under Armour)
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6. Under Armour ColdGear Infrared Softshell Gloves

A wonderfully warm solution for photographers

Specifications

Colors: Available in black, stealth grey
Sizes: S, M, L, XL

Reasons to buy

+
Perfect for cold winter conditions
+
Compatible with touchscreens

Reasons to avoid

-
Slightly bulky

One of our favorite techniques for shooting in wintry conditions is to use a thin pair of gloves, such as the North Face Etip gloves at the top of the page, and pair them with a thick pair whenever you're not using your camera. These windproof and water-resistant gloves are designed to keep your hands warm in almost all conditions. 

The inside features a thermo-conductive coating that's designed to absorb and retain body heat, while the outside is made of a combination of an elasticated man-made material and suede. There's also silicone grips on the palm area as well. 

(Image credit: Vbiger )
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7. Vbiger Men’s Touchscreen Gloves

Not the warmest but extremely flexible

Specifications

Sizes: M, XL
Colors: Black, Black and grey

Reasons to buy

+
Lycra material is very flexible

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the warmest

The Vbiger Men’s Touchscreen Gloves have been designed with flexibility in mind: The gloves are elastic material means that they fit your hands perfectly.

While the lycra-style gloves aren’t the warmest, they are extremely flexible and lightweight making them perfect to travel with, and they feature superb silicon grips so you can be sure you're in control.

The touchscreen-compatible pads on the thumb and forefinger are a little slippery but work well enough. These gloves are also harder to get outside of the US, so bear that in mind when making your selection. 

Read more

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Jon spent years at IPC Media writing features, news, reviews and other photography content for publications such as Amateur Photographer and What Digital Camera in both print and digital form. With his additional experience for outlets like Photomonitor, this makes Jon one of our go-to specialists when it comes to all aspects of photography, from cameras and action cameras to lenses and memory cards, flash diffusers and triggers, batteries and memory cards, selfie sticks and gimbals, and much more besides.  


An NCTJ-qualified journalist, he has also contributed to Shortlist, The Skinny, ThreeWeeks Edinburgh, The Guardian, Trusted Reviews, CreativeBLOQ, and probably quite a few others I’ve forgotten.