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Nikon brings its mirrorless 1 series to a close

Nikon has officially discontinued its 1 series of mirrorless cameras and lenses.

The line began in 2011 with the announcement of the 1 J1 and 1 V1 models. Since then, the range has been populated by a number of beginner- and enthusiast-focused cameras, lenses and accessories, including the only interchangeable-lens camera that can be used underwater, the 1 AW1.

Popularity of the 1 series has declined in recent years, and no new cameras have been introduced since the 1 S5 back in 2015. Furthermore, in contrast to other manufacturers of mirrorless systems such as Sony and Fujifilm, the 1 system has attracted very little third-party support, which has lessened its appeal even further.

The Nikon 1 J1 (pictured) and 1 V1 were the first models announced in the series.

The Nikon 1 J1 (pictured) and 1 V1 were the first models announced in the series.

The company is widely expected to be announcing a new mirrorless system ahead of this year's Photokina trade show in September. Many expect that the system will be based around cameras with full-frame sensors, which would place it in direct competition with Sony's full-frame Alpha models such as the A7 III.

Nikon had admitted to a shift in focus from its entry-level models through to options targeted towards enthusiasts and professional users. Its most recent D850 full-frame DSLR has won much praised since its launch last year.

Read more: 10 tips on getting the best out of your Nikon camera

Matt Golowczynski

The former editor of Digital Camera World, "Matt G" has spent the bulk of his career working in or reporting on the photographic industry. For two and a half years he worked in the trade side of the business with Jessops and Wex, serving as content marketing manager for the latter. 


Switching streams he also spent five years as a journalist, where he served as technical writer and technical editor for What Digital Camera before joining DCW, taking on assignments as a freelance writer and photographer in his own right. He currently works for SmartFrame, a specialist in image-streaming technology and protection.