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First look at this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners!

Treetop douc by Arshdeep Singh, India Highly Commended 2020, 11-14 Years Old (Image credit: Arshdeep Singh, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the world's most well-known and prestigious competition for nature and conservation images, and the winners showcase the best  photography from amateur and pros alike.

Although the overall winners of the contest won't be announced until 13 October, the shortlisted images have just been revealed. A perching primate, perishing habitats and peeking possums are among the scenes chosen by the judging panel.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London and the competition is amazingly now in its 56th year.

The shortlisted images are carefully selected by a panel of international photo experts, and this year's contest had almost 50,000 entries.

Among the newly revealed Highly Commended images is thirteen-year-old Arshdeep Singh's image of a douc, a critically-endangered primate, surrounded by the lush greens of its environment. It's a classic portrait that maintains eye contact with the viewer. 

As well as celebrating glorious and fascinating species, the competition is also renowned for its photojournalistic submissions. Charlie Hamilton James's commended image of a lone tree surrounded by the vicious flames of a forest fire stands as a testament to human impact upon the Amazon rainforest and the damage being done to the natural world. 

The perfect catch by Hannah Vijayan, Canada Highly Commended 2020, 15-17 Years Old (Image credit: Hannah Vijayan, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

Amazon burning by Charlie Hamilton James, UK Highly Commended 2020, Wildlife Photojournalism: Single Image (Image credit: Charlie Hamilton James, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

Paired-up puffins by Evie Easterbook, UK Highly Commended 2020, 11-14 Years Old (Image credit: Evie Easterbrook, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

The spider's supper by Jaime Culebras, Spain Highly Commended 2020, Behaviour: Invertebrates (Image credit: Jaime Culebras, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

The night shift by Laurent Ballesta, France Highly Commended 2020, Under Water (Image credit: Laurent Ballesta, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

Treetop douc by Arshdeep Singh, India Highly Commended 2020, 11-14 Years Old (Image credit: Arshdeep Singh, Wildlife Photographer of the Year)

When to see the Wildlife POTY 2020 exhibition

For the first time, the 2020 awards ceremony will be conducted virtually from the Natural History Museum's iconic Hintze Hall.

The exhibition opens on Friday 16 October 2020 and will run until June 2021.

After the flagship exhibition is unveiled at the museum, the images will then embark on a UK and international tour.

To find out more and book tickets, visit the National History Museum site