6 simple tips for better pictures of planes

Action photography tips: 6 ways to get better pictures of planes

Pictures of planes, like pictures of birds, can be incredibly difficult to capture, if not more. Their size and speed can lead to shots with awkward compositions or poor focusing, let alone exposing against a bright sky.

Inside we offer 6 of our best tips for getting yourself into position and your digital camera set up ideally to take top-notch pictures of planes in flight or on the ground.

Make HDR images from 2 exposures

HDR Tutorial: make HDR images from 2 exposures

Exposure blending enables you to mix images to get perfectly exposed skies, not always from the same scene. It’s not only a simple way of making HDR images, but it’s also a way of making more realistic-looking HDR images.

The process when shooting is simple and most cameras have a built-in Bracketing feature to aid you further. It’s crucial that one image captures the detail of the sky and the other that of the foreground – then you use Layers and Masks to blend the two.

Shoot and stitch panoramic photos in 8 easy steps

Shoot and stitch panorama photos in 8 easy steps

Panoramic photos are a great way to showcase sweeping landscapes. By shooting a series of overlapping images and combining them on your computer, you can take in a much wider angle of view. This technique also means you don’t need an expensive wide-angle lens – your 18-55mm standard lens is fine.

This photo stitching technique is much better than taking a wide-angle shot and simply cropping it because it produces a picture with a much higher resolution. Stitching photos together in this way might sound complicated, but it’s not. All you need is a tripod and Photoshop Elements or higher. We’ve used Elements because it has a Photomerge Panorama tool that makes stitching photos really easy.

Still life photography: depth of field mastered in 8 steps

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If you use a point-and-shoot camera or cameraphone, it’s often almost impossible not to get everything from your feet to the distant horizon in focus. But the large sensors built into DSLRs means it can be surprisingly difficult to get everything in the frame looking sharp.

That’s because the bigger sensors used on DSLR cameras mean less depth of field (DOF). While blurred backgrounds can be a real bonus for subjects such as portraits, the limited zone of sharpness can be a problem for other types of photography.