Pentax unveils K-50, K-500: price, release date, full specs revealed

Pentax unveils K-50, K-500: price, release date, full specs revealed

Ricoh Pentax has unveiled two new entry-level DSLRs, officially announcing details of the Pentax K-500 and Pentax K-50 price, specs and release date overnight.

Both new Pentax cameras share the same 16-megapixel APS-C sensor introduced with the Pentax K-30, and both cameras also offer high-sensitivity shooting at ISO 51200.

How to buy a camera: 5 things you need to know about choosing a DSLR

How to buy a camera: 5 things you need to know about choosing a DSLR

Looking to buy a camera but overwhelmed by all the choice? Our expert guide on how to buy a camera reveals 5 crucial DSLR tips covering sensors, pixels, shooting modes, interfaces and everything else you need to know when buying a camera.

Pentax unveils weatherproof K-30 DSLR

Weatherproof Pentax K-30 DSLR revealed

Pentax has announced a new DSLR to sit in its line-up, featuring a weatherproofed body and shake-reduction technology.

The company says that the features found in the K-30 are more commonly found in higher specced cameras, but the body shape and size is more reflective of an entry-level model.

Featuring a 16.2 million pixel CMOS sensor and a PRIME M image processor, which enables the K-30 to shoot full HD video at 30fps. A wide sensitivity range of between ISO 100 and ISO 12,800 (expandable up to ISO 25,600) is also available.

DO or Di? Your lens markings explained

DO or Di? All your lens markings explained

Does your lens has more letters after its name than a retired rocket scientist. What do all these lens markings mean? You can refer to a lens simply by the name of the manufacturer, the focal length, and its maximum aperture – a Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6, say, or Canon 50mm f/1.4. But as lenses have often evolved from decades of development, they usually have a line of additional letters after their names, stamped on the barrel or printed on the boxes.

Some lens markings are about manufacturer branding – defining a more recent range, or a lens that’s built to higher standards than another. Others are to do with the optics themselves, and to highlight specific technologies used in the lens construction. In the jargon-busting guide below, we’ll translate these lens markings for you.