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The best DSLR cameras in 2018

Here are the best DSLR cameras you can buy right now

There are some spectacular DSLRs on the market right now. So which is the best DSLR camera for you? Well, it depends on what you shoot and how you shoot it.

Right now, we think the overall best DSLR camera is the Nikon D850; it's a fantastic all-rounder with stellar image quality and cracking 4K video too. However, this model won't be right for everybody, and there are some key considerations to make when buying a DSLR, depending on what type of photography you want to do.

If your big thing is landscape or architectural photography, you'll want a full-frame camera that goes large on megapixels to deliver the greatest levels of fine detail and texture. For shooting in low-light conditions, however, you'll want a smaller megapixel count to yield relatively low-noise images, even at very high ISO settings.

Regardless of megapixel count, full-frame DSLRs give you an advantage if you need a shallow depth of field. They're ideal for blurring the background in portraiture and still-life photography.

For sports and wildlife, a DSLR camera with a smaller APS-C-format image sensor can be a better fit. The 1.5x crop factor (1.6x for Canon) gives you greater ‘effective’ telephoto reach, without the need for monstrously large and heavy lenses. 

Indeed, with the typically smaller build of their bodies and accompanying lenses, an APS-C-format camera system can also be preferable for general walkabout shooting and travel photography. 

Here, we take a look at the best DSLRs you can get right now. 

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1. Nikon D850

This Nikon delivers high-megapixel photography with an impressive turn of speed

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 45.7MP | Lens mount: Nikon FX | Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 7fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Mighty resolving power
Pro-grade build but still compact
Fairly noisy at very high ISO settings
Vertical grip is an optional add-on

The D810 set a new benchmark in high-resolution Nikon DSLRs and the newer Nikon D850 pushes things a lot further, raising the stakes from 36.3MP to 45.7MP. It also has the same updated metering module fitted to the D5 and D500, as well as an upgraded autofocus system with 153 instead of 53 points, and an increase in maximum drive rate from 5fps to 7fps. You can boost the drive rate to 9fps if you add the optional MB-D18 battery grip and EN-EL 18b battery. 4K movie capture is yet another upgrade. All in all, the D850 represents a major revamp of the D810 and is a much better all-rounder. Even so, image quality can look a bit noisy at very high ISO settings, especially compared with the super-clean images produced by the D5 and D750.

Read more: Nikon D850 review

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2. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

As an all-rounder, this is Canon’s best full-frame camera

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 30.4MP | Lens mount: Canon EF | Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 7fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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30.4MP is a good compromise
Pro performance, manageable size
Touchscreen fixed in place
Big price jump from EOS 5D Mark III

The EOS 5D Mark IV is Canon’s all-time best DSLR camera if you want a reasonably high megapixel count without sacrificing too much in the way of continuous drive speed, and clean, noise-free image quality at very high ISO settings. A newer design than the Canon EOS 5DS and 5DS R cameras (at number 7 in this guide), key improvements include 4K movie capture, a touchscreen interface, relatively quick Live View autofocus thanks to the Dual Pixel CMOS AF image sensor, and f/8 compatibility in regular focusing with all 61 AF points, instead of just the central point. Classic EOS 5D controls are intuitive and easy to live with, and image quality is simply stellar. Boasting an impressive spec sheet, this DSLR is arguably the best you can buy if you're looking for a brilliant camera that works well in all situations. 

Read more: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV vs Nikon D850

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3. Nikon D750

An excellent full-frame Nikon all-rounder at a highly competitive price

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 24.3MP | Lens mount: Nikon FX | Screen: 3.2in tilting screen, 1,229,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 6.5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Very good all-round performance
Competitively priced
Less solidly built than the D850
‘Consumer’ (ie not pro) controls

For those who want really clean, low-noise images – even at high ISO settings – or just want to avoid the massive data sizes of ultra-high-resolution photos, the Nikon D750 is a better choice than the D850 (at number 1 in this list). It’s also only about half as much to buy and, while it uses a mix of magnesium alloy and polycarbonate body panels instead of having a full metal jacket, it still feels pretty robust and well-made. The 51-point autofocus system is highly proficient and metering is very reliable. The camera is no slouch, although it lacks the outright speed of most up-market Nikon cameras, with the shutter speed and drive rate topping out at 1/4000sec and 6.5fps respectively. The layout of buttons and dials is more consumer than pro level, but, even so, the D750 is sure to be Nikon’s most appealing all-rounder for many photographers – and, at this price, it’s excellent value for money.

Read more: The best Nikon D750 deals right now

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4. Canon EOS 6D Mark II

The revamped Mark II edition of Canon’s full-frame EOS 6D is an affordable option for enthusiasts

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 26.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF | Screen: 3.2in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 6.5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast

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Packs a lot of upgrades
Lightweight for a full-frame DSLR
Pricier than the original EOS 6D
AF points clustered in centre of frame

The original EOS 6D dates back to 2012, so the EOS 6D Mark II was a long time coming. The megapixel count rises from 20.2MP to 26.2MP, delivering greater resolving power but slightly more image noise at high ISO settings. The autofocus system goes from 11 points (one cross-type) to 45 points (all cross-type), and the new sensor has Dual Pixel CMOS AF for improved Live View and movie autofocus. Maximum continuous drive increases from 4.5fps to 6.5fps, while handling has also improved, with a vari-angle touchscreen and 5-axis stabilisation for movie capture. With the addition of NFC and Bluetooth, the EOS 6D Mark II is also better connected. All in all, it’s a cracking camera and the most affordable of Canon’s current full-frame DSLR lineup.

Also read: Canon EOS 6D Mark II review

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5. Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

Canon’s top full-frame DSLR for action, sports and wildlife photography

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 20.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF | Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 14/16fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Professional

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Very robust, superb handling
Super-fast frame rate
Heavyweight build and price
Small megapixel count

Built like a tank and almost as heavy, the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II nevertheless has sublimely natural handling, thanks to its built-in vertical grip and meticulously duplicated control buttons and dials. Like the competing Nikon D5, (see number 11 in this list) it sacrifices megapixels for outright speed. As such, resolving fine detail isn’t this DSLR camera’s strong point, but it offers a blisteringly fast continuous drive rate of 14fps, rising to 16fps in Live View mode. This makes the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II ideal for shooting sports and wildlife, especially as the fast drive rate is backed up by a 61-point autofocus system that’s superb at tracking moving subjects. Images remain impressively noise-free even at very high ISO settings, making this one of the best DSLR cameras you can buy right now if you're a pro.

Read more: The best Canon EOS-1D X Mark II deals right now

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6. Nikon D7500

This high-performance Nikon APS-C camera retains beginner-friendly controls

Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C | Megapixels: 20.9MP | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 922,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 8fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast

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Has the best bits from the D500
Lightweight build
Less robust than the D500
Downgraded autofocus system

The Nikon D7500 packs most of the best specifications and features from the pro-grade D500 into a smaller and lighter consumer-class body. As such, it has a more enthusiast-level control layout, and the body shell is based on carbon-fibre composite, rather than including magnesium alloy parts. Even so, you get the same 20.9MP image sensor and EXPEED 5 processor, a 1/8000sec maximum shutter speed and 4K video capture capability as in the D500. There’s virtually nothing to choose between the two cameras in terms of image quality, but the D500 has a downgraded 51-point rather than 153-point autofocus system, and autofocus at f/8 is limited to a single AF point rather than 15 points, which can be an issue if you shoot with tele-converters. The maximum drive rate is also slower, but still pretty brisk at 8fps.

Read more: Nikon D7500 review

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7. Canon EOS 5DS/5DS R

A 50.6MP image sensor makes this the best Canon DSLR for capturing fine detail

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 50.6MP | Lens mount: Canon EF | Screen: 3.2in, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Super-high megapixel count
Two versions available
Limited ISO range
Comparatively noisy at high ISOs

Based on the highly popular but now superseded EOS 5D Mark III, the Canon EOS 5DS bumps up the megapixel count from 22.3MP to a whopping 50.6MP. It’s Canon’s best DSLR camera for resolving fine detail and texture, making it better suited to stills-only photographers. The EOS 5DS R goes further still, cancelling the anti-aliasing effect of the optical low-pass filter to enable even greater resolving power, although there’s an increased risk of moire patterning and false colour. Both versions of the camera have an upgraded smooth-action shutter unit to avoid resolution being degraded by camera vibrations. The downsides of all the extra megapixels include a relatively limited ISO range with increased image noise at high ISO settings and a sluggish 5fps maximum drive rate. File sizes are pretty big too, with Raw files averaging around 64MB each. The 5DS/5DS R isn’t a video or sports camera: it takes stunning still images, with staggering detail. If you need the maximum level of detail – for studio photography, say – go for the EOS 5DS R; otherwise save some cash and go for the EOS 5DS. If you need a DSLR that's more versatile, try the EOS 5D Mark IV, above.

8. Canon EOS 7D Mark II

A super-speedy, pro-grade APS-C-format camera for sports and wildlife photography

Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C | Megapixels: 20.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3in, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 10fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Pro-grade handling and build quality
Great for action shooting
Modest megapixel count
No touchscreen or Wi-Fi

Similar to the EOS 5D series of cameras in design and robust magnesium alloy build, the Canon EOS 7D Mark II is Canon’s top-grade APS-C format DSLR. As with the 6D Mark II, the second edition of the EOS 7D was five years in the making and represents a significant upgrade over that model. A real go-faster camera for action shooting, it has a 65-point wide-area autofocus system with ‘Intelligent’ tracking in AI Servo mode, and rapid 10fps continuous drive. Dual DIGIC 6 processors are on hand to help with the fast throughput of data, and the buffer is big enough to enable top-speed shooting for 31 frames in its Raw mode, or enough JPEG images to fill your memory card. Speaking of which, there are dual CompactFlash and SD/SDHC/SDXC card slots. As usual with ‘fast’ DSLRs, however, there’s a drop in megapixel count, this time to 20.2MP.

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9. Nikon D500

A super-fast Nikon APS-C-format camera that’s ideal for sports, action and wildlife photography

Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C | Megapixels: 20.9MP | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 10fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Excellent performance
Telephoto-boosting DX format
Lower MP count than most DSLRs
Canon 7D Mark II rival is cheaper

With the telephoto-boosting 1.5x crop factor of Nikon’s DX (APS-C) format DSLRs, superfast 10fps drive rate and capacious memory buffer for up to 200 Raw files, the Nikon D500 is a spectacular camera for sports and wildlife photography. It’s solidly built as well, with pro-grade robustness and handling. Indeed, the layout of controls will be instantly familiar to photographers who have grown to love Nikon’s pro-class DSLR design ethos. As such, the shooting mode dial is replaced by a button cluster for quick access to important settings, like in the D5 and D850. Around the back, there’s a 3.2in tilting touchscreen with a mighty 2,359k-dot resolution, again matching the D850. The D500 is currently best sporty, pro-grade APS-C format DSLR on the market, edging ahead of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II.

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10. Canon EOS 80D

A consummate all-rounder at the top of Canon’s ‘enthusiast’ range of APS-C-format bodies

Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C | Megapixels: 24.2MP | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 7fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast

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Relatively compact and lightweight
Fully articulated rear screen
Single memory card slot
No Bluetooth (but Wi-Fi and NFC)

Whereas Canon’s EOS 7D Mark II APS-C format camera (number eight) is a speed specialist, the Canon EOS 80D is more of an all-rounder. It has a greater megapixel count of 24.2MP and a more relaxed but still quite speedy 7fps maximum drive rate. Both DSLR cameras have Dual Pixel CMOS AF, but the EOS 80D’s articulated touchscreen is much more intuitive for selecting autofocus areas in Live View and when shooting movies. The regular 45-point autofocus system is the same as the one used in the full-frame EOS 6D Mark II but, in the EOS 80D, the spread of points covers a larger area of the image frame. 27 of the AF points are available at f/8, instead of just one in the EOS 7D Mark II. Advanced features and slick controls make the EOS 80D well suited to enthusiast photographers.

Read more: Canon EOS 80D review

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11. Nikon D5

Nikon’s top-flight professional camera for fast-paced action

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 20.8MP | Lens mount: Nikon FX | Screen: 3.2in touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 12/14fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Professional

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Built-in vertical grip
Super-fast continuous drive
Big, heavy and very expensive
Relatively low megapixel count

A real powerhouse of a camera, the Nikon D5 is Nikon’s top-flight pro DSLR with rock-solid build quality to match. Like the competing Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, it has a built-in vertical grip that enables the duplication of controls for natural portrait-orientation shooting. The design also accommodates an oversized battery with the stamina for 3,780 shots from a single charge. Rapid drive rates keep up with the fastest sports and wildlife action, as well as enabling you to capture fleeting expressions or nail a definitive moment in unpredictable shooting scenarios. The frame rate tops out at 12fps but you can boost it to 14fps if you can live with the mirror being locked up after the first shot in a sequence. The flip side is that the megapixel count is relatively low by current standards, at 20.8MP.

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12. Pentax K-1 Mark II

The new generation of Pentax’s range-topping full-frame DSLR

Type: DSLR | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 36MP | Lens mount: Pentax K | Screen: 3in three-way-tilt, 1,037k dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 4.4/6.4fps | Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD) | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Robust construction
5-axis image stabilisation
Pedestrian continuous drive speed
Relatively low 670-shot battery life

Typical of most Pentax DSLRs, the range-topping Pentax K-1 Mark II is solid and dependable, with a tough, weather-sealed construction. It also has highly effective sensor-shift image stabilisation system that works with any attached lens, unlike competing Canon and Nikon DSLRs. Better still, the 5-axis stabilizer can work in trick modes to deliver anti-aliasing correction, an increase in fine detail and texture based on Pixel Shift through multiple exposures, and even an Astrotracer mode to avoid stars appearing to streak through the sky. With a 36MP full-frame image sensor, the K-1 Mark II certainly gives you a lot of megapixels for the money, but the 33-point autofocus system is adequate rather than outstanding, and Live View autofocus is poor. Continuous drive is sluggish at 4.4fps, but it’s boosted to 6.4fps in APS-C crop mode.

Read more: Pentax K-1 Mark II review

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13. Sony Alpha A99 Mark II

High megapixel count meets fast drive rate in this full-frame Sony SLT camera

Type: SLT | Sensor: Full frame | Megapixels: 42.4MP | Lens mount: Sony A | Screen: 3in tilting, 1,228,800 dots | Viewfinder: OLED | Max burst speed: 8/12fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast/professional

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Fast frame rate and high MP count
5-axis image stabilisation
390-shot battery life with the EVF
AF tracking is a bit disappointing

When is an SLR not an SLR? When it’s an SLT. Sony’s ‘Single Lens Translucent’ cameras have a fixed mirror that enables light from the lens to pass through to the shutter and image sensor, while simultaneously reflecting light to a dedicated autofocus module. With no flapping mirror, the full-frame Sony Alpha A99 Mark II is certainly a smooth operator, and somewhat unique in combining a fast 12fps drive rate with a high megapixel count of 42.4MP. The hybrid autofocus system combines a 79-point phase-detection module with 399 paired pixel sites on the image sensor. It’s highly accurate for static subjects but, considering the fixed mirror enables uninterrupted operation of autofocus during continuous shooting, the A99 II struggles more than you’d expect when tracking moving subjects. Built-in stabilisation helps fend off camera-shake, and steadiness is aided by the lack of mirror movement and an optional electronic first curtain for the shutter. The electronic viewfinder gives an accurate preview of exposure settings but lacks the smoothness of an optical viewfinder when panning. Ultimately, the A99 II’s key selling point is that it combines a high megapixel count with a fast continuous drive rate, in a more compact build than DSLRs like the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II and Nikon D5.

Read more: Sony A99 II review

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14. Pentax KP

A high-grade Pentax APS-C camera that’s packed with smart features

Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C | Megapixels: 24.3MP | Lens mount: Pentax K | Screen: 3in tilting screen, 921,000 dots | Viewfinder: Pentaprism | Max burst speed: 7fps | Max video resolution: 4K | User level: Enthusiast

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Strong, weather-sealed build
5-axis image stabilisation
Poor autofocus in Live View
Short 390-shot battery life

Pentax’s range-topping APS-C format camera, the Pentax KP, has a tough, weather-sealed construction and a sporty 7fps continuous drive, along with a slightly odd maximum shutter speed of 1/6000sec. You can bump that up to 1/24,000sec by switching from mechanical to electronic shutter operation. Around the back there’s a tilting LCD but it’s not a touchscreen and, as in the full-frame K-1 Mark II, autofocus is disappointingly slow in Live View mode. Regular phase-shift autofocus has 27 AF points, all but two of which are cross-type. The KP’s image quality is impressive in terms of dynamic range and high-ISO image noise but, overall, the camera struggles to compete with similarly priced Canon and Nikon DSLRs.

Read more: Pentax KP review

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