Panning: how the pros capture motion (and the best shutter speeds to use)

Panning: how the pros capture motion blur (and the best shutter speeds to use)

Panning is a great way to capture a sense of movement in your action photography, by blurring the background, but keeping the subject sharp. Panning is often thought to be quite difficult, but in reality, with sound technique and some practice you can capture motion blur quite easily. Below we’ll show you how it is done and reveal the best shutter speeds to use for different common subjects.

Best shutter speeds for every situation

Best shutter speeds for every situation

Do you struggle with finding the best shutter speeds when shooting unfamiliar subject matter? It can be difficult to know how to set up your camera to freeze movement, capture motion blur and other popular in-camera effects.

In the latest of our ongoing photography cheat sheet series, we’ve put together our list of what we believe are the best shutter speeds for every situation.

Common mistakes at every shutter speed (and the best settings you should use)

Common mistakes at every shutter speed (and the best settings you should use)

At a basic level, shutter speed is used to control exposure, but it can also be used as a creative tool that freezes action or adds dramatic blur to moving subjects. In this tutorial we’ll explain some of the common mistakes you might encounter while trying to achieve the five classic shutter speed effects of freezing movement, blurring action, using blur creatively, long exposures and night photography.

After we look at some of the common problems within these shutter speed ranges, we’ll suggest the best shutter speeds for you to use to achieve these effects and offer our best tips for overcoming these errors.

What is shutter speed: everything you need to know

What is shutter speed: everything the beginner photographer needs to know

Like the aperture setting, the shutter speed you choose is not simply a way of controlling exposure. The speed also has a visible effect on your pictures – allowing you to control the effect of a moving camera or subject. This can ensure pin-sharp pictures, however unsteady your grip on the camera and however fast the subject is moving.

Shutter speed is the length of time that the shutter blinds in front of the camera sensor are left open. The scale used is much easier to understand than the f/stop aperture system, as exposures are measured in fractions of a second.

Get to know your camera

Get to know your camera

Got a new camera for Christmas or just upgraded? Master it quickly with our easy guide to camera settings, exposure, aperture, shutter speed, focus modes, lens choice, flash modes, image editing, printing, camera accessories, camera care, and more…