The 6 best Photoshop layers any photographer can use

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 04/03/2014 00:01am
    The 6 best Photoshop layers any photographer can use

    Photoshop has many types of layers and adjustment layers available, but there are six that you’ll find you need to use again and again.

    Video: how to share photos on Flickr and Facebook via Photoshop Elements

    | Videos | 02/04/2012 06:30am
    How to share photos on Facebook and Flickr via Photoshop Elements

    Despite all the fuss over the recent announcements of Photoshop CS6 and its new features, it’s worth remembering that Photoshop Elements is also quite a powerful piece of software. And a fraction of the CS6 price tag!

    In the short video tutorial below, we show you how you can use some of Photoshop Elements’ new sharing options to post photos on Flickr and Facebook and start doing more with your photos.

    How to make a photo book in Photoshop Elements

    | Videos | 31/03/2012 09:00am
    Photo Ideas: how to make a photo book in Photoshop

    Despite all the fuss over the recent announcements of Photoshop CS6 and its new features, it’s worth remembering that Photoshop Elements is also quite a powerful piece of software. And a fraction of the CS6 price tag!

    In the video tutorial below we show you how you can make a photo book in Photoshop Elements that looks just as slick and professional as some of the templates you find on many photo printing websites.

    Photoshop Tutorial: master the Curves tool

    | Videos | 18/03/2012 07:00am
    Photoshop video: master the Curves tool

    The Curves tool is one of the more powerful weapons in the Photoshop arsenal. This handy function allows you to make precision adjustments to some of the fundamental elements of an image – tone, colour and contrast – and in this short, but essential, Photoshop tutorial we’ll show you how to do just that.

    While the exposure and dynamic range optimisation systems in modern digital cameras are sophisticated, they aren’t foolproof or psychic. Most images can benefit from some post-capture adjustment to their brightness and contrast, and the Photoshop Curves tool is ideal for making these precision adjustments. Click to watch the video and see how it’s done!

    Photoshop effects: correct lens distortion in 4 steps

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 17/03/2012 10:30am
    Photoshop Effects: correct lens distortion in 4 steps

    Getting a perfectly straight landscape photo isn’t always easy to achieve in-camera. Thankfully, by following a few simple steps in Adobe Camera Raw you can correct this lens distortion and get the perfect vista you were hoping to achieve. Here’s how to do it.

    Fix a photo: background distractions removed in 3 steps

    | Photography Tutorials, Tutorials | 08/03/2012 15:43pm
    Fix a photo: background distractions removed in 3 steps

    Many promising photos are let down by a poor or distracting background. Anything in the distance that competes for attention will naturally draw the eye away from the subject and the impact of the shot will instantly be lost.

    A common problem is shooting with your subject too close to the background. This means that anything behind the subject appears in partial focus and the subject itself doesn’t stand out. Other potential hazards include photo background distractions such as burnt-out areas, out-of-focus ‘blobs’, competing colours and unwanted intrusions, such as foliage. The good news is that they are all easily avoided. Here’s how…

    Focus stacking: how to fake perfect focus in Photoshop

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 05/03/2012 12:15pm
    Focus stacking: how to fake perfect focus in Photoshop

    Sometimes it’s just not possible to get everything sharp at once. When you’re zoomed in tight on a subject, there might never be enough depth to get everything sharp, even at the lens’s minimum aperture.

    The answer is to shoot a series of images with the focus set slightly further away each time, and then use a technique called ‘focus stacking’ to merge the separate photos into a finished picture that’s sharp from front to back.

    Replace boring skies with Photoshop selection tools

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 29/02/2012 12:31pm
    Photoshop Tricks: replace boring skies with Photoshop selection tools

    When it comes to taking photos (or trying to top up your tan) the weather inevitably will let you down, even when you’re shooting in an exotic holiday destination. This can be especially annoying if you’re trying to capture white sands, bright blue seas and clear blue skies.

    But thanks to one of our favourite Photoshop tricks, we can select our start image’s drab overcast sky and use the Photoshop selection tools to replace it with a more brochure-like graduated blue. On its own, the Photoshop Magic Wand tool can select most of the picture’s original sky, even if it contains a mixture of greyscale clouds and patches of blue.

    Photoshop X-Ray Effect: 6-step tutorial and video

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 27/02/2012 15:50pm
    Photoshop X-Ray Effect: 6-step tutorial and video

    One of our favourite Photoshop tricks is the way that the characteristic negative tones and cyan hues of X-rays can be easily applied to regular images.

    OK, so we’re not really looking inside our subject, but the overall effect works a treat when creating a Photoshop X-Ray.

    We used a shot of the underbelly of a plastic toy frog shot with a ring flash on a white background, but other regular objects can be transformed with this technique, too. So let’s see how it’s done. You have two options here: you can watch the short video below showing you how to get the Photoshop X-Ray effect, or below that we have a step-by-step Photoshop tutorial spelling out everything you need to do.

    Photoshop Elements: red eye removal in 4 simple steps

    | Photoshop Tutorials, Tutorials | 22/02/2012 16:33pm
    Red eye removal in Photoshop Elements

    Red eye has long been the bane of photographers. How many times have we photographed our friends and family in a variety of social scenarios, and the flash photography leaves our pictures of people looking like demons!

    Red-eye occurs when your camera uses a burst of flash to capture a decent exposure. In low-light conditions our pupils open wide so that we can see more clearly. This means that a sudden influx of light from the camera will illuminate the eyes’ interior, bouncing off the blood vessels on our retinas – and adding a sinister red glow to our subject’s eyes.

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