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    Black and white landscape photography: why rich color is the key to bold mono

    | Landscape | Photography Tips | 23/07/2014 00:01am
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    Black and white landscape photography: step 04 Use a screen loupe

    Black and white landscape photography: step 04 Use a screen loupe

    LCD screens are often hard to see in bright sunlight, so a dedicated screen loupe can be another worthwhile investment if you spend a lot of time shooting outdoors.

    It magnifies the screen and shades it from sunlight, making reviewing images much easier.

    Hoodman makes a three-inch model for screens up to three inches wide.

    SEE MORE: Monochrome photography – how to compose images using your camera’s mono mode

    Black and white landscape photography: step 05 Attach a cable release

    Black and white landscape photography: step 05 Attach a cable release

    Using a cable release is essential if you want to get shots that are tack-sharp throughout.

    Even on a bright sunny day, if you’re shooting at ISO100 and an aperture of, say, f/16 to maximise depth of field (as was the case for our image), you’ll need a shutter speed of about 1/60 sec – slow enough to result in less-than-perfect shots if you jog the camera even a fraction when releasing the shutter.

    If you’re using an SLR, it’s also worth setting the mirror lock-up feature, as the movement of the mirror when the shutter is released can cause the camera to vibrate.

    Mirror lock-up basically lifts the mirror out of the way when you press the shutter release once, so you can no longer see anything through the viewfinder, and then opens the shutter at the shutter speed you’ve set when you press it again.

    SEE MORE: 10 common exposure problems every photographer faces (and how to fix them)

    Black and white landscape photography: step 06 Take it steady

    Black and white landscape photography: step 06 Take it steady

    If it’s windy, it’s a good idea to hang a heavy bag – or similar – onto the bottom of your tripod’s central column, to hold it firmly in place.

    A small nylon bag with a draw-cord is ideal, as it packs down very small, weighs next to nothing and can simply be filled with stones as needed.

    SEE MORE: 8 tripod mistakes every photographer makes (and how to avoid them)

    Black and white landscape photography: step 06 Take it steady

    If you’re shooting on sand, gravel or grass, it’s also a good idea to drive your tripod legs firmly into the ground – if you don’t it might sink a little during longer exposures, resulting in blurred shots.

    PAGE 1: See in black and white
    PAGE 2: Filters; long lenses
    PAGE 3: Use a screen loupe; Attach a cable release; Tripod tips

    READ MORE

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    Posted on Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 at 12:01 am under Landscape, Photography Tips.

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