How to sell photos online and in print: 6 ways to find your photographic niche

How to sell photos online and in print: 6 ways to find your niche as a photographer

Become known as a specialist, and you’ll find yourself the go-to photographer for certain types of shot. As our series on how to sell photos online and in print continues we look at the most important thing you’ll ever do as a photographer: find your niche.

How to sell photos online and in print: 6 ways to find your niche as a photographer

Image by Gill Moon

We spoke to professional photographer Gill Moon, who offers landscape, lifestyle and sport photography, specialising in water sports. Below Gill shares her best tips for specialising in one subject and giving your photography a clear focus

6 ways to find your niche as a photographer

How to sell photos online and in print: Gill Moon01 Use your existing knowledge
I’ve always loved the sea, so it made sense to photograph sailing events. Working as an events photographer has really taken off, and is now a big part of my work.

02 Make it clear you’re a specialist
The great thing about working In a tight-knit industry is that people will hear of you as an expert in their field. Specialisation encourages clients to seek out your services.

03 Print cards
Cards are a great way to make extra money as they’re cheap to produce yourself (try a service like moo.com).

04 Sell calendars
My first calendar of seascapes sold really well and I produce one annually. I’m lucky to be married to a graphic designer, who helps me design everything!

6 ways to find your photographic niche

05 Work seasonally
Sailing photography in Britain is very seasonal. I spend the summer on the water and the winter organising projects for the next year.

06 Juggle JPEG and RAW
If I’m shooting an event I have to quickly upload shots for people to buy, so shooting JPEG makes sense. If I’m on a job for a magazine or a corporate client, I always shoot in RAW.

READ MORE

Beginner photography tips: the most common mistakes and how to avoid them
10 common exposure problems every photographer faces (and how to fix them)
Digital camera effects from A-Z
10 things you aren’t doing with your images but really should