DxO Optics Pro 9 review: will this software make your camera perform better?

DxO Optics Pro 9 review: can this software make your camera perform better than you thought possible?

DxO Optics Pro 8 review

In our DxO Optics Pro 8 review we weigh the pros and cons of this photo editing software to determine if it’s the perfect Photoshop alternative for photographers.

DxO Optics Pro 8 review: is the perfect Photoshop alternative?

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: what’s new

DxO Optics Pro is more of an image-enhancer than an image-manipulator. 
It’s designed to take the imperfect images captured by your camera and your lenses, correct their faults and make them as technically perfect as possible.

It’s all based on hard science, using custom-made correction profiles for thousands of camera-lens combinations.

These are tested by parent company DxO Labs, which also makes its testing processes and equipment available to other companies – Digital Camera World uses DxO equipment for its camera and lens tests, for example.

DxO Optics Pro identifies the camera and lens using the EXIF shooting information embedded in the file, then loads the appropriate correction profile automatically, or prompts you to download one.

It doesn’t support every possible camera and lens combination, but it’s rare to find a mainstream camera-lens combination that’s not on the list.

The software then automatically corrects a range of lens faults, including chromatic aberration (colour fringing), distortion (barrel and pincushion), corner shading (vignetting) and edge softness.

You can also manually correct perspective distortion and anamorphous distortion, where objects are distorted at the edges of wide-angle shots.

 

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: Performance

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: Performance

DxO works on both raw and JPEG files, but these must be unedited. 
The raw conversions are of a very high standard, and are particularly good at reducing noise in high ISO shots.

It also uses advanced lighting controls to maximise the dynamic range of raw files and balance the lighting in high-contrast scenes.

But it’s not an image editor as such, because although it offers various preset ‘looks’, it doesn’t support layers, or any kind of manual, localised adjustments.

This means DxO Optics Pro is a tool you’d use right at the start of your image-editing workflow to maximise the quality of your original images.

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: Performance

If you never manipulate your images anyway, that could be enough, but you’re almost certainly going to need some other image-editor to go with it.

The Standard version isn’t that expensive, but if you have an advanced SLR you may need the Elite version, which is twice the price.

The tools are the same, and it all depends on what camera you use. If you have a Nikon D7000, for example, the Standard edition is fine, but if you have an advanced SLR you may need the Elite version, which is twice the price.

The tools are the same, and it all depends on what camera you use. If you have a Nikon D7000, for example, the Standard edition is fine, but if you have a D800, you’ll need Elite.

 

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: the interface in detail

DxO has made some improvements to the interface of DxO Optics Pro 8. Take a look at our cheat sheet below where we illustrate some of the key features to consider.

Click on the infographic to expand the file, or simply drag and drop it to your desktop to read the larger version.

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: the interface in detail

 

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: how it scores

DxO Optics Pro 8 Review: how it scores

Price: £269

Features: 2/5
Ease of Use: 3/5
Results: 5/5
Value: 2/5

Buy it because

DxO will examine your photographs’ EXIF data to identify the cameras and lenses used, and offer to download any profiles you don’t yet have.

PAGE 1: New features in DxO Optics Pro 9
PAGE 2: Using DxO’s Smart Lighting and visual presets
PAGE 3: DxO Optics Pro 9 Review: the verdict
PAGE 4: Our original DxO Optics Pro 8 review

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